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Borrowing a car...

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  • Louis-Luc
    Hi everyone, Last weekend, I was with 2 friends. Both of them have driver s license, but they own only one car. We were to go out of the city for the evening,
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 6, 2002
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      Hi everyone,

      Last weekend, I was with 2 friends. Both of them have driver's license, but
      they own only one car. We were to go out of the city for the evening, with 6
      other friends, and the place we were going to was only accessible by car in
      less than an hour. However, the 6 friends are carfree, as well as I.
      Therefore we needed a second car to transport everyone.

      My friend's sister accepted to lend her car for the evening, and she lives
      10 minutes away, maybe 500 to 700 meters. So we just needed to get to her
      house, implying a walk no longer than the one I take daily to get to the
      train station (8 to 10 minutes).

      The enigma is: people who don't drive can walk to the second car but can't
      drive it back, and people who can drive it seemingly can't walk to it. So
      the only solution my 2 friends found was to go to the second car using the
      first car, thinking that walking was not feasible (for them) even if it's a
      one-way trip.

      I feel kind of sad because it seems driving a car takes away (mentally, and
      then physically) natural walking capabilities...

      Louis-Luc
    • Doug Salzmann
      ... Incessantly riding in cars from birth may even prevent assimilation of the *concept* of walking as transportation. I swear that the following is true. My
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 7, 2002
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        At 05:55 PM Wednesday 3/6/2002, Louis-Luc wrote:

        >I feel kind of sad because it seems driving a car takes away (mentally, and
        >then physically) natural walking capabilities...


        Incessantly riding in cars from birth may even prevent assimilation of the
        *concept* of walking as transportation. I swear that the following is true.

        My wife, Linda, a long-time teacher, has been substituting in a friend's
        4th grade class (nine- and ten-year-olds, at this time of
        year). Yesterday, she happened to use the word "pedestrian" while speaking
        to the class. One of the brightest kids in the class immediately asked,
        "What's a pedestrian?"

        Linda asked the class, "Who knows what 'pedestrian' means?" One child
        did. One fourth-grader.

        These are mostly upper middle class kids from suburban and semi-rural
        neighborhoods in northern California. They never walk anywhere, take a bus
        or train in the course of normal life, or travel via any mode other than
        private automobile.

        As far as we can determine, exactly one of the hundreds of kids in
        attendance walks to school -- from his grandparents' adjacent
        property. None ride bicycles. I wouldn't walk or ride a bike anywhere
        around there, either.

        Linda has been riding the bus each day (not easy to do, but she's
        determined). The staff and faculty think she's crazy and the kids all feel
        very sorry for her.

        When these kids grow up, they will be just like Louis-Luc's friends. They
        won't be able to imagine walking anywhere, even to pick up a car.

        Very weird and very sad.

        -Doug



        ---
        The Carfree Institute
        Post Office Box 5175
        Larkspur, California 94977

        info@...
      • turpin
        ... Sadly, they are a generation who will suffer an epidemic of back problems. We evolved to walk. We are very well adapted to it. And walking is how we
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 7, 2002
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          --- In carfree_cities@y..., Doug Salzmann <doug@c...> wrote:
          > These are mostly upper middle class kids from suburban
          > and semi-rural neighborhoods in northern California.
          > They never walk anywhere

          Sadly, they are a generation who will suffer an epidemic
          of back problems. We evolved to walk. We are very well
          adapted to it. And walking is how we maintain the muscles
          that support the spine.
        • sebastian_from_poland
          ... but can t ... it. So ... using the ... if it s a ... (mentally, and ... Hi, I had very similar but some way opposite experience when I used to be in States
          Message 4 of 4 , Mar 12, 2002
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            > The enigma is: people who don't drive can walk to the second car
            but can't
            > drive it back, and people who can drive it seemingly can't walk to
            it. So
            > the only solution my 2 friends found was to go to the second car
            using the
            > first car, thinking that walking was not feasible (for them) even
            if it's a
            > one-way trip.
            >
            > I feel kind of sad because it seems driving a car takes away
            (mentally, and
            > then physically) natural walking capabilities...

            Hi,
            I had very similar but some way opposite experience when I used to be
            in States several year ago.
            As you wrote, it was strange for you that people who drive "can't"
            walk or rather can't imaging themselves walking.
            I'm from Poland and I used to walk even for long distances and one
            day I did it States. I went to video rental and the trip both ways
            took me about 40 minutes. For me it was a nice trip because I could
            see the town at least along my way during the walk. When I returned
            home to my hosts with whom I used to live and told them about it I
            had a feeling that they thought of me like a little bit crazy person.
            Besides I felt strange walking almost alone along sideways.
            It's really strange and even dangerous what happens to people.
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