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Re: [carfree_cities] Do public schools cause sprawl ??

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  • Mark Rauterkus
    ... To a degree you are correct. In cities with poor school districts, the flight to the burbs is huge. This is an interesting question that might exceed the
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 2, 2002
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      > So here's the very un-PC question: Does the current public school
      > system create sprawl?

      To a degree you are correct.
      In cities with poor school districts, the flight to the burbs is huge. This
      is an interesting question that might exceed the talk of this list's focus
      however. It opens a very holistic approach and a very long conversation.

      The trend is for heavy engageent of Mayors in cities in school districts.
      That has not been the case.

      So, the public schools don't cuase the sprawl, IMHO. However, poor
      performing schools and educational settings in urban areas (a legacy of
      being older neighborhoods) helps to drive sprawl.

      > And conversely, will true school choice help
      > the cities, and create more compact urban geographies?

      Perhaps.

      We could write volumes on this thread. And, what works in some cities might
      not in others -- and we may not really get to the carfree part. So, without
      a green-light to talk in depth and lenth, I'll opt to listen and delay my
      reply out of repect for the list's charter.

      Ta.


      Mark Rauterkus
      Mark@... http://Rauterkus.com
    • turpin
      The primary feature of the current public school system is that a family s residential location determines what schools their children attend. Parents will do
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 2, 2002
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        The primary feature of the current public school system is that a
        family's residential location determines what schools their children
        attend. Parents will do a lot of things to expand their choice in
        schools. Those with a lot of money simply pay twice, to send their
        children to private schools. Some register their children at a chosen
        public school using the address of a nearby relative. Many simply
        move to a preferred school district, when their children reach school
        age. Even if the parents prefer to live in town, moving to the
        suburbs becomes the economic and practical way to get their children
        into a better school. Any real estate agent will tell the importance
        of school district in determining real estate demand and values.
        Class flight to the suburbs and exurbs then grows on itself. The
        better school districts in the suburbs have more money because they
        attract higher-income residents, who bid up the real estate, creating
        a higher tax base. They also have more highly educated residents, who
        want the benefits of good schools, and whose involvement helps
        improve the schools.

        So here's the very un-PC question: Does the current public school
        system create sprawl? And conversely, will true school choice help
        the cities, and create more compact urban geographies?
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