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Re: [carfree_cities] Bikes on transit vehicles

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  • Mark Rauterkus
    Hi *, ... Hummm. Handle the navigation of the following: + baby or toddler (if not two or three as siblings), + bus (or some other moving mass transit vehicle)
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 21, 2001
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      Hi *,

      > Strollers are permitted on buses and trains but must be folded before
      > boarding.

      Hummm. Handle the navigation of the following:
      + baby or toddler (if not two or three as siblings),
      + bus (or some other moving mass transit vehicle)
      + baby gear (diaper bag, toys, etc.)
      + perhaps the fare to pay as boarding the bus
      + and a stroller that MUST BE FOLDED.

      Do you realize how hard it is to handle a folded stroller in the above
      situations?

      I think stroller pushers of the world need a better political action
      committee.

      I'm a stay-at-home dad. I think that the folded stroller rules stink. Can
      anyone here help me figure it out?

      Reactions welcomed. Sorry to stray from the mentions of bikes. Perhaps this
      is the next frontier for access for the advocates here?

      Other points:
      + Folded strollers are easier for passengers to trip over. When the
      stroller is upright, it is seen.
      + Folded strollers can't fit anywhere (hardly) that a non-folded
      stroller can.
      + Open strollers generally (all mine did) have brakes and can be
      prevented from rolling.
      + A child of the age of 5 can push a stroller helping the parent with
      the baby in arms. Meanwhile only an adult could help navigate the progress
      of a folded stroller.
      + A folded stroller can roll easier and topple more easier than an
      upright stroller with its brakes deployed.
      + An umbrella stroller would fold well for the bus but are NOT options
      for others situations. The umbrella is great for folded deployment but
      horrid for using as transport with a kid.
      + With my first kid, our stroller cost more than our car. (Bonus points
      from this forum hoped for.)


      Ta.


      Mark Rauterkus
      Mark@... http://Rauterkus.com
    • Karen Sandness
      on 01.12.21 5:03 AM, carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com at ... For $5 per year, a cyclist in Portland, Oregon may receive a bike permit that allows him or her to
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 21, 2001
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        on 01.12.21 5:03 AM, carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com at
        carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com wrote:

        >
        > Message: 2
        > Date: Thu, 20 Dec 2001 23:13:49 -0000
        > From: "billt44hk" <telomsha@...>
        > Subject: Re: Hi! I'm new here and happy to be carfree! (Chicago)


        > Can others please let me know of other cities where facilities such
        > as this are provided for bicycle carriage on commuter trains and
        > buses? The more I can say, 'well they do it in Chicago and...' it
        > will help in my arguments with the cycle -hostile authorities here.
        >
        For $5 per year, a cyclist in Portland, Oregon may receive a bike permit
        that allows him or her to take a bike on either a bus or a light rail train.

        All buses have "cow catcher" type attachments on the front that hold two
        bikes. The trains have two types of arrangements: the older cars have a
        space where cyclists may stand with their bikes, while the newer ones have a
        space where the seats fold up, which may be used either for bikes or
        wheelchairs, although wheelchairs have priority.

        Thanks to efforts of the city's Bicycle Transportation Alliance, many light
        rail stations have covered bike lockers.

        Strollers are permitted on buses and trains but must be folded before
        boarding.

        All buses have wheelchair lifts, which are also used by people with canes or
        crutches to avoid the step up. Some of the newer buses "kneel." In other
        words, the driver can lower the chassis so that there isn't so much of a
        step up.

        All trains have at least one "low floor" car, which lacks the rather steep
        steps of the old-style cars. People in wheel chairs can signal the driver to
        release the flap that covers the space between the platform and the train.

        All these features are heavily used, as far as I can tell.

        In transit,
        Karen Sandness
      • James Rombough
        ... I use a MacLaren stroller. It s easier to push than the cheap, non-umbrella strollers, and when folded is just as easy to carry as a cheap umbrella
        Message 3 of 3 , Dec 21, 2001
        • 0 Attachment
          Re:

          > An umbrella stroller would fold well for the
          > bus but are NOT options
          > for others situations. The umbrella is great for
          > folded deployment but
          > horrid for using as transport with a kid.

          I use a MacLaren stroller. It's easier to push than
          the cheap, non-umbrella strollers, and when folded is
          just as easy to carry as a cheap umbrella stroller.

          I used to buy cheap strollers (umbrella and regular),
          but it turns out the expensive strollers last much
          longer, so they really cost the same.

          On the NYC subway, I never fold the stroller. Halfway
          between doors is the most convenient place to put an
          unfolded stroller when it gets crowded.

          On the Dallas, Washington, D.C. and Los Angeles
          subways, I have to fold the stroller because the cars
          have mostly forward/backward-facing seats, so the
          usable floor space isn't much better than a bus. I
          guess they didn't figure they would have standees.
          Luckily, that's proving to be false in L.A.


          --- Mark Rauterkus <mark@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi *,
          >
          > > Strollers are permitted on buses and trains but
          > must be folded before
          > > boarding.
          >
          > Hummm. Handle the navigation of the following:
          > + baby or toddler (if not two or three as
          > siblings),
          > + bus (or some other moving mass transit
          > vehicle)
          > + baby gear (diaper bag, toys, etc.)
          > + perhaps the fare to pay as boarding the bus
          > + and a stroller that MUST BE FOLDED.
          >
          > Do you realize how hard it is to handle a folded
          > stroller in the above
          > situations?
          >
          > I think stroller pushers of the world need a better
          > political action
          > committee.
          >
          > I'm a stay-at-home dad. I think that the folded
          > stroller rules stink. Can
          > anyone here help me figure it out?
          >
          > Reactions welcomed. Sorry to stray from the mentions
          > of bikes. Perhaps this
          > is the next frontier for access for the advocates
          > here?
          >
          > Other points:
          > + Folded strollers are easier for passengers to
          > trip over. When the
          > stroller is upright, it is seen.
          > + Folded strollers can't fit anywhere (hardly)
          > that a non-folded
          > stroller can.
          > + Open strollers generally (all mine did) have
          > brakes and can be
          > prevented from rolling.
          > + A child of the age of 5 can push a stroller
          > helping the parent with
          > the baby in arms. Meanwhile only an adult could help
          > navigate the progress
          > of a folded stroller.
          > + A folded stroller can roll easier and topple
          > more easier than an
          > upright stroller with its brakes deployed.
          > + An umbrella stroller would fold well for the
          > bus but are NOT options
          > for others situations. The umbrella is great for
          > folded deployment but
          > horrid for using as transport with a kid.
          > + With my first kid, our stroller cost more than
          > our car. (Bonus points
          > from this forum hoped for.)
          >
          >
          > Ta.
          >
          >
          > Mark Rauterkus
          > Mark@... http://Rauterkus.com
          >
          >
          >
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