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Re: [carfree_cities] Partial pedestrian

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  • J.H. Crawford
    ... Not every walkway necessarily needs to have this capacity. Some of the bridges crossing the below-grade road could be bike- and pedistrian-only. ... Always
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 30, 2001
      continuing the exchange with Will Stewart and Tom:

      >And as you mentioned the other day, an underground road can bring in
      >supplies to the center of a district that is being added on to a
      >typical population center. This concept is similar to the underground
      >tunnel access to shopping malls for freight trucks, but could also be
      >used for access to limited underground parking for the office and
      >commercial buildings.
      >
      >Walkways should be constructed to support the incidental fire truck or
      >heavy equipment needed to renovate a 6 story building. The latter
      >would be very infrequent, so the car-free concept would still hold.

      Not every walkway necessarily needs to have this capacity. Some of
      the bridges crossing the below-grade road could be bike- and
      pedistrian-only.

      >Pedicabs are doing brisk business in downtown New York right now, and
      >are starting to grow in other US cities as well. The very elderly or
      >those who are having trouble getting around could use these (i.e.,
      >someone with a leg in a cast, etc).

      Always the question whether they should be slow, battery-powered
      (as in Zermatt) or bike. Either one works for me, although the
      costs and trade-offs differ.

      >Or bicycle use allowed along the larger "collector" walkways (8 mph
      >max), while they are walked on the smaller "feeder" walkways. A
      >design heuristic might allow for a set of marked-off bike lanes in the
      >middle of the collector walkways.

      sure

      > >>Another issue is getting garbage out. Once a week, a garbage truck
      >and a
      > >>recycling truck drive down the alley behind my house. I
      > >>would hate to see these services become significantly more
      > >>expensive or less convenient.
      >
      >There are medium-sized electric refuse trucks available.
      > http://home.earthlink.net/~v_stewart/trashtruck.jpg

      San Francisco has a fleet of amazingly quiet diesel garbage
      trucks. These were specially hushed when SF decided to collect
      at night, when traffic wasn't an issue.

      >If a transit stop is planned for a greenfield area in the suburbs,
      >then I see a carfree district as very practical, as there are enormous
      >numbers of metro stops available to the residents of the carfree
      >district that are packed with offices, retail, etc.

      sure

      >Any other sites
      >not accessible to metro would be accessible to vehicles that are
      >carshared (now available in Boston, Washington,
      >Seattle, and other US cities).

      yes, should work ok

      >The carfree district becomes an urban
      >oasis that frankly has little interaction with the rest of the
      >suburban area, unless the suburbans want to stroll/bike over to work,
      >shop, dine, etc.

      Nah, we'd want to keep them out! ;-)

      Under these circumstances, I'd expect the suburban area to
      urbanize eventually, at least that part that was within
      easy walking distance.

      Regards,


      -- ### --

      J.H. Crawford Carfree Cities
      postmaster@... Carfree.com
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