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Horror

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  • Hillel Schocken
    I would like to share with all Americans and all fredom loving people my grief and outrage of yesterday s tragic events. Hillel Schocken [Non-text portions of
    Message 1 of 7 , Sep 12, 2001
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      I would like to share with all Americans and all fredom loving people my grief and outrage of yesterday's tragic events.

      Hillel Schocken



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Chris Bradshaw
      Out of the horror comes courage, community, and insight. My wife was born near the WTC (her family in the NYC area are all accounted for). The pictures of
      Message 2 of 7 , Sep 12, 2001
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        Out of the horror comes courage, community, and insight. My wife was born near the WTC (her family in the NYC area are all
        accounted for).

        The pictures of people evacuating the lower Manhattan area by foot, including walking over roads and bridges that were
        ordered car-free were especially poignant: another example of how important walking and streetlife are.

        The carnage itself was resulted from combining modern long-distance modes of travel carrying huge amounts of petroleum
        incendiary hitting a high-density population target dependent on "vertical transit" powered by the fuel-dependent grid (and
        which was disabled when it was needed most).

        Of course, if the culprits turn out to have been motivated by fundamentalist hatred of modern life, it will probably turn
        out to have been be partly financed by oil money.

        It emphasizes our need for human-scale cities. But to most U.S. leaders, it will only emphasize their desire to protect the
        "American way of life" primarily by retaliation.

        Chris Bradshaw
        Ottawa
      • Simon Baddeley
        Thank you for these reflections, Chris. I have been ringing American friends to express condolences. I m hesitant to do any interpretation - though goodness
        Message 3 of 7 , Sep 12, 2001
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          Thank you for these reflections, Chris. I have been ringing American friends
          to express condolences. I'm hesitant to do any interpretation - though
          goodness knows the mainstream media are doing enough of it. I don't quite
          feel entitled to stand apart from the formal view of things that is being
          defined, because there are periods of mourning when alternative
          interpretations are forced into the background. The shared feelings seem to
          require shared thinking. Anything else might imply one was not also
          struggling with nausea and shock and grief at the awfulness of the scenes
          presented us on our screens.

          There's a moment when Macduff hears the news of the killing by Macbeth's
          thugs of his family including his small children and as the news delivered
          by a hesitant messenger gets through to him he weeps. One of his companions
          tells him to brace himself for action. He says "But first I must feel it
          like a man."

          This evening I went to a our 6-weekly ward meeting about things like refuse
          collection, local crime figures and other public services in our area. I
          find these gatherings frustrating and futile most of the time because our
          local politicians are not of the first order. This evening amid familiar
          irrelevancies and badly chaired attempts at debate I felt grateful for the
          tedium and left the meeting almost cheerful.

          Best wishes

          Simon

          Simon Baddeley
          34 Beaudesert Road
          Handsworth
          Birmingham B20 3TG
          United Kingdom
          England
          00 44 121 554 9794
          mobile 07775 655842

          From: Chris Bradshaw <chris@...>
          To: <carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Thursday, September 13, 2001 1:06 AM
          Subject: Re: [carfree_cities] Horror


          Out of the horror comes courage, community, and insight. My wife was born
          near the WTC (her family in the NYC area are all
          accounted for).
        • Louis-Luc
          ... 100% agree. That s the positive feeling I have from yesterday s event. Walking, bicycling, wheelchair pushing, cart pulling, treebranch draging: warmth,
          Message 4 of 7 , Sep 12, 2001
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            > Out of the horror comes courage, community, and insight. My wife
            > was born near the WTC (her family in the NYC area are all
            > accounted for).
            >
            > The pictures of people evacuating the lower Manhattan area by
            > foot, including walking over roads and bridges that were
            > ordered car-free were especially poignant: another example of how
            > important walking and streetlife are.
            100% agree. That's the positive feeling I have from yesterday's event.
            Walking, bicycling, wheelchair pushing, cart pulling, treebranch draging:
            warmth, comfort and serenity are there as soon as you see everyone's face on
            the road, not enclosed in individualist glass cages and without the noise
            and threat of those gas guzzlers.

            I was happy to see all the roads around NY island full of people,
            suburbanites walking back home. But God, one does not need to wait the
            destruction of the city to do that.

            We walked in Quebec city, and in many other places all
            over the world to pray for the victims.

            WALKING IS SOLIDARITY AMOUNGT PEOPLE.


            > It emphasizes our need for human-scale cities. But to most U.S.
            > leaders, it will only emphasize their desire to protect the
            > "American way of life" primarily by retaliation.
            >
            > Chris Bradshaw
            > Ottawa
            >
            Yup. It's more than time to require that the devastated
            parts of NYC is built with humans in mind, NOT CARS. The best thing would be
            to turn the exact lot of the WTC into a park in memory for all the victims,
            turn all adjacent streets into attractive walkways, and at the end of each
            walkway (formerly stressful intersections) build a tower, maybe 20 to 40
            stories high (not as high as they were). Many adjacent buildings are ruined
            or damaged anyways, so they could be rebuilt to accomodate with the style of
            new ones. With perhaps a dozen of those new towers, the new WTC would
            recover all office space in a kind of ring that would serve as a fortress
            for human life in the center. And all outer streets from the ring would
            become alleys: dead end, parking, and delivery area for cars and trucks, and
            entrance into the complex for others. And at least one metro station would
            lead into the fortress or connect to ring towers...

            Possibilities are countless.

            Frankly, I find yesterday's event was an horror, but it certainly can be
            compared with the horror the car-infested roads show us by chopping the life
            of innocent people EACH DAY of the year. Why do they keep silence on this
            perpetual tragedy?

            Louis-Luc
          • Matt Hohmeister
            Before I say anything, I would like to express my deepest condolences to everyone who was affected by the tragedy. My parents are in New Jersey as I speak, and
            Message 5 of 7 , Sep 13, 2001
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              Before I say anything, I would like to express my deepest condolences
              to everyone who was affected by the tragedy. My parents are in New
              Jersey as I speak, and I have numerous family and friends in both
              attacked cities. Fortunately, all of them are accounted for. I was
              working in my state office when I first heard about events unfolding
              (as friends were frantically firing instant messages to me), and since
              all the news web sites were bogged down, I was restricted to a
              radio--which still didn't do justice, especially since I was only able
              to pick up one AM news station--6th floor and surrounded by
              fluorescent lighting, computers, cube walls, and cinder blocks doesn't
              do too much for radio reception. When my boss sent me home at 1130, I
              *sprinted* home (down the dead center of an incomplete road, so I had
              a carfree run home. I usually take a longer, paved route, but I was in
              a hurry and frankly didn't care about picking up mud). I frantically
              called around, and learned that all are OK. With that, I start my
              carfree rant(s):

              I was listening to National Public Radio last night, and heard someone
              say that "people are going around New York City using unconventional
              methods--skates, scooters..." I found this quite odd. Shouldn't it
              always be this way. If the streets of NYC were open only for
              pedestrian and bicycle traffic, they're plenty wide for everyone to do
              whatever they want. :)

              I'm talking right now with my friend in DC, who's still in shock after
              it all. She says that the streets of DC are closed, save buses and
              emergency. "The way it should be.", she said. Thank you, Sarah--you
              said it.

              I wonder if the rebuilding done in NYC will include closed streets. I
              would surely hope so.

              By the way, I ran into a motorcycle parked dead-center on a sidewalk
              on my way to work today. I kicked it hard. If I was not in a hurry to
              get to my office, I probably would have shoved it over and, if
              approached about it, say "It was in my way." FSU does absolutely
              nothing about motorcycles parked in obtrusive methods--especially
              around athletic facilities. (Why? So student athletes don't go to a
              competing university when their motorcycle is removed? I have no
              idea!)

              rant done

              --matt

              > The carnage itself was resulted from combining modern long-distance
              modes of travel carrying huge amounts of petroleum
              > incendiary hitting a high-density population target dependent on
              "vertical transit" powered by the fuel-dependent grid (and
              > which was disabled when it was needed most).
              >
              > Of course, if the culprits turn out to have been motivated by
              fundamentalist hatred of modern life, it will probably turn
              > out to have been be partly financed by oil money.
              >
              > It emphasizes our need for human-scale cities. But to most U.S.
              leaders, it will only emphasize their desire to protect the
              > "American way of life" primarily by retaliation.
              >
              > Chris Bradshaw
              > Ottawa
            • duane cuthbertson
              It s hard to think clearly about much else than the WTC et al. but I can t help but notice... ...that Amtrak s business has picked up tremendously in reaction
              Message 6 of 7 , Sep 13, 2001
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                It's hard to think clearly about much else than the WTC et al. but I can't
                help but notice...

                ...that Amtrak's business has picked up tremendously in reaction to the
                Airline industry lapse. I wonder in what way consumer confidence will react
                as the air industry gets going again. Will people start to consider the
                train as a safer way to travel and then demand that they be more efficient?
                Will Congress now bolster our rail infrastructure even just as a contingency
                plan? I would think that Amtrak will have no problem finding the funding for
                their planned upgrades now.
                Even our one trip a day train from OKC to Dallas was busier. And that is a 4
                1/2 hour trip compared to a 2 1/2 hour drive.

                Duane


                >From: "Matt Hohmeister" <mdh6214@...>
                >Reply-To: carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com
                >To: carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com
                >Subject: [carfree_cities] Re: Horror
                >Date: Thu, 13 Sep 2001 12:41:04 -0000
                >
                >Before I say anything, I would like to express my deepest condolences
                >to everyone who was affected by the tragedy. My parents are in New
                >Jersey as I speak, and I have numerous family and friends in both
                >attacked cities. Fortunately, all of them are accounted for. I was
                >working in my state office when I first heard about events unfolding
                >(as friends were frantically firing instant messages to me), and since
                >all the news web sites were bogged down, I was restricted to a
                >radio--which still didn't do justice, especially since I was only able
                >to pick up one AM news station--6th floor and surrounded by
                >fluorescent lighting, computers, cube walls, and cinder blocks doesn't
                >do too much for radio reception. When my boss sent me home at 1130, I
                >*sprinted* home (down the dead center of an incomplete road, so I had
                >a carfree run home. I usually take a longer, paved route, but I was in
                >a hurry and frankly didn't care about picking up mud). I frantically
                >called around, and learned that all are OK. With that, I start my
                >carfree rant(s):
                >
                >I was listening to National Public Radio last night, and heard someone
                >say that "people are going around New York City using unconventional
                >methods--skates, scooters..." I found this quite odd. Shouldn't it
                >always be this way. If the streets of NYC were open only for
                >pedestrian and bicycle traffic, they're plenty wide for everyone to do
                >whatever they want. :)
                >
                >I'm talking right now with my friend in DC, who's still in shock after
                >it all. She says that the streets of DC are closed, save buses and
                >emergency. "The way it should be.", she said. Thank you, Sarah--you
                >said it.
                >
                >I wonder if the rebuilding done in NYC will include closed streets. I
                >would surely hope so.
                >
                >By the way, I ran into a motorcycle parked dead-center on a sidewalk
                >on my way to work today. I kicked it hard. If I was not in a hurry to
                >get to my office, I probably would have shoved it over and, if
                >approached about it, say "It was in my way." FSU does absolutely
                >nothing about motorcycles parked in obtrusive methods--especially
                >around athletic facilities. (Why? So student athletes don't go to a
                >competing university when their motorcycle is removed? I have no
                >idea!)
                >
                >rant done
                >
                >--matt
                >
                > > The carnage itself was resulted from combining modern long-distance
                >modes of travel carrying huge amounts of petroleum
                > > incendiary hitting a high-density population target dependent on
                >"vertical transit" powered by the fuel-dependent grid (and
                > > which was disabled when it was needed most).
                > >
                > > Of course, if the culprits turn out to have been motivated by
                >fundamentalist hatred of modern life, it will probably turn
                > > out to have been be partly financed by oil money.
                > >
                > > It emphasizes our need for human-scale cities. But to most U.S.
                >leaders, it will only emphasize their desire to protect the
                > > "American way of life" primarily by retaliation.
                > >
                > > Chris Bradshaw
                > > Ottawa
                >
                >
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                >
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                >
                >


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              • Chris Bradshaw
                ... The number of people who die on our roads _each day_ is equal to that of one of the planes that crashed Tuesday, about 100 people. I repeat, every day.
                Message 7 of 7 , Sep 13, 2001
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                  Louis-Luc wrote:

                  > Frankly, I find yesterday's event was an horror, but it certainly can be
                  > compared with the horror the car-infested roads show us by chopping the life
                  > of innocent people EACH DAY of the year. Why do they keep silence on this
                  > perpetual tragedy?

                  The number of people who die on our roads _each day_ is equal to that of
                  one of the
                  planes that crashed Tuesday, about 100 people. I repeat, every day.
                  [And the
                  ratio of the dead to the seriously injured is about 10:1, vs the reverse
                  ratio of
                  Tuesday's tragedy.]

                  Thus if the final death toll turns out to be 5,000 people, it represents
                  about 1.5
                  months of "normal" road carnage [estimates of vertebrates-as-road-kill
                  are between
                  500,000 to 1,000,000 _per day_ vs. presumably none Tuesday].

                  Chris Bradshaw
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