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Re: Walking in the rain

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  • dearleb@home.com
    ... cause ... sure ... One can look to other existing pedestrian areas in rainy places. For example, in the car-free central area of Santiago de Compostela in
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 8, 2001
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      --- In carfree_cities@y..., cjb121@y... wrote:
      > Heavy rain, snow and particularly hail stones are all going to
      cause
      > problems in a carfree city. It's not too bad if the weather is bad
      > before you leave your house as you have the opportunity to put on
      > your coat, pick up your umbrella etc. It can be much worse if the
      > weather changes on your way home.
      >
      > At my old university (York) the main walkways are all covered, with
      > each small roof supported by metal posts. Although they're not
      > pretty, they are a welcome relief if it's raining heavy. With a
      > little more effort, surrounding them with trees for example, I'm
      sure
      > they could be made much more attractive.

      One can look to other existing pedestrian areas in rainy places. For
      example, in the car-free central area of Santiago de Compostela in
      (very rainy) northwest Spain, many of the buildings have elegant
      covered walkways as an integral part of the structure. Other examples
      include the main street in Bern, Switzerland, which while not carfree
      can get nastier weather than Spain, including I'm sure hail. The
      shophouses of southeast Asia can also provide completely covered
      walkways to evade those daily tropical downpours (though these days
      they are often blocked by motorcycles and such).
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