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Sprawl along I-15

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  • Ronald Dawson
    From http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/uniontrib/wed/opinion/news_1ed2roads.html Dawson Union-Tribune Editorial Sprawl along I-15 San Diego adds houses, but
    Message 1 of 2 , May 6, 2001
      From
      http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/uniontrib/wed/opinion/news_1ed2roads.html
      Dawson

      Union-Tribune Editorial

      Sprawl along I-15
      San Diego adds houses, but no roads

      May 2, 2001

      When the city of San Diego approved the community of Sabre Springs in 1986,
      Poway filed suit to block the development because nothing was being done to
      mitigate the traffic it would force onto Poway Road and Interstate 15. Poway
      lost and, very soon, Poway Road and I-15 became nightmares as nearly 7,000
      new residents started commuting.

      When Carmel Mountain Ranch, another development along I-15 in San Diego,
      came along some seven years later, more protests were raised because no
      traffic mitigation was planned. But no one paid any heed, and I-15 became
      even more of a nightmare as Carmel Mountain Ranch's nearly 10,000 new
      residents started commuting.

      Now, San Diego is poised to approve another development, Rancho Encantada,
      that will add to the near gridlock of I-15. And, once again, nothing in the
      way of traffic mitigation is in the works. That's business as usual for San
      Diego planners, whose motto seems to be, "Build it now, and worry about it
      later."

      The 1,000-home Rancho Encantada definitely will impact I-15, since its
      commuters will feed onto the freeway just south of Poway Road, where both
      the morning backup is peaking and the evening backup is beginning. It also
      will deliver a knockout blow to the already overtaxed Scripps Poway Parkway,
      the main access road to Poway's thriving business park.

      What has been needed for a long time along I-15 is some kind of long-range
      traffic planning. A new north-south freeway, between I-15 and state Route
      67, has been on the county's drawing board for years. It is desperately
      needed, but it hasn't been built -- and may never be built -- because of
      lack of funding.

      But that hasn't stopped San Diego from approving developments on city land
      along I-15, while, at the same time, downsizing such major connecting
      arteries as Scripps Poway Parkway (from six lanes to four) and Pomerado Road
      (from four lanes to two lanes). That's traffic planning of the worst sort.

      A study by the San Diego Association of Governments five years ago dealt the
      I-15 corridor another blow by concluding its population wasn't dense enough
      to warrant serious consideration for a trolley extension. That lack of
      density is a result of such developments as Sabre Springs, Carmel Mountain
      Ranch and Rancho Encantada. They're not "smart growth," as regional planners
      call vertical buildup along transportation corridors. They're urban sprawl.
      But they had to be, because San Diego closed its eyes to traffic
      mitigation.

      It's time that the city opened them. A recent Superior Court ruling
      overturned the Los Angeles County supervisors' vote approving the massive
      Newhall Ranch project just south of Ventura County because no thought was
      given to providing water for the development's 70,000 residents. Adding yet
      another collection of houses to the I-15 corridor without doing anything to
      improve the already wretched traffic conditions would be nearly as
      thoughtless.

      Copyright 2001 Union-Tribune Publishing Co.
    • Doug Salzmann
      ... [Snip] ... Use of the expression urban sprawl is as clear a signal as a flare at sea. People who use it are foundering and confused. They don t know
      Message 2 of 2 , May 6, 2001
        On Sunday 06 May 2001 13:39, Ron Dawson shared with us a:

        > Union-Tribune Editorial
        >
        > Sprawl along I-15
        > San Diego adds houses, but no roads
        [Snip]
        > A new north-south freeway, between I-15 and
        > state Route 67, has been on the county's drawing board for years. It is
        > desperately needed, but it hasn't been built -- and may never be built --
        > because of lack of funding.

        Use of the expression "urban sprawl" is as clear a signal as a flare at
        sea. People who use it are foundering and confused. They don't know what
        cities are. Burbs sprawl. Urbs are an entirely different matter.

        This editorial is sad, of course, but also pretty funny stuff. This piece
        could easily have been reworked from one of a number of editorials
        published here in Sonoma County over the past decade or so, or from a
        million more just like them from the East Bay, or the Santa Clara Valley,
        or. . . They ought to trade these articles around. It would save a lot of
        writing time.

        You really have to wonder. The editorial writers at all of the concerned
        newspapers are adults with at least average intelligence, reasonably decent
        educational backgrounds, and varying amounts of life experience, almost all
        of it in car-dominated environments. Why do you suppose that none of them
        have noticed that nobody has *ever* succeeded in mitigating auto congestion
        over the long term by adding highway capacity?

        If you build it, they will come.

        One is tempted to think that they'll never stop, but they will, of course.

        In the meantime, neither the sprawl monsters nor the silly hand-wringers
        who believe it can all be made better with just a little more tweaking are
        very good at grasping big new concepts. They are not likely to learn the
        folly of their ways until it's too late, until the houses in the mid-ring
        sprawlburbs are *losing* thirty percent of their value annually and the
        squatters in the furthest-flung burbs are burning the doors of the
        three-car garages for heat. There's not much reason to waste one's energy
        trying to explain to them.

        Far better to work toward development of urban districts designed for
        humans instead of machines, neighborhoods capable of functioning without
        endlessly increasing inputs of scarce and expensive energy, places actually
        worth living in. If we're lucky, we'll have some examples ready by the
        time the parking attendants in the national auto slum start looking around
        to figure out what to try next.

        -Doug
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