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Re: [carfree_cities] Car only streets

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  • Andrew Preble
    ... In the French Quarter in New Orleans, all buses and trucks are banned (public and private) because of the sensitivity of the old houses and old streets
    Message 1 of 8 , Apr 2, 2001
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      "J.H. Crawford" wrote:

      > While buses can be a real blight on heavy routes, it seems unforgivable
      > to me to ban buses and allow cars in the center. In Utrecht and
      > other Dutch cities, precisely the opposite is true: cars can't drive
      > across the center, but public transport can.

      In the French Quarter in New Orleans, all buses and trucks are banned (public and
      private) because of the sensitivity of the old houses and old streets being
      constantly shaken by the heavy vehicles. Private cars are allowed on half of it
      while the other half is car/bus/truck free.
      --Andrew
    • philip@aal.cix.co.uk
      ... No offence, but it seems really odd to ban buses from the city centre. Not to the car/tram-obsessed Labour politicians running the city, I m afraid. ...
      Message 2 of 8 , Apr 4, 2001
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        > philip@... wrote:
        > are there any other examples of strategic link roads in
        > city
        > >centres (perfectly wide enough for buses), where buses have been
        > banned,
        > >but private vehicles, vans and lorries are still allowed? This happens
        > on
        > >a section of High Street, Manchester,

        >
        No offence, but it seems really odd to ban buses from the city centre.

        Not to the car/tram-obsessed Labour politicians running the city, I'm
        afraid.
        >
        > >1a. Continue to get the bus to the eastern peripheral terminus (fare
        > �7 a
        > >week any distance for the vast majority of users), and then walk up to
        > a
        > >mile crossing the city streets where motorists ignore illegal turns and
        > >pedestrian-phased lights, and the chances of being hit by a pavement
        > >cyclist is high.
        >
        > That's sad and your police seem to be very inept.

        They simply aren't around. They would see it as minor offences (until
        someone is killed), and to be fair to them, they are stretched. Manchester
        has 30% less Police Officers per head than London, for instance.
        >
        > >1b. Continue to get the bus to the same point, walk about 100 yards,
        > wait
        > >for an unknown length of time for a tram that isn't full, pay an
        > >additional �7.40 a week, then a further walk to your connecting
        > bus/office
        > >desk.
        >
        > That's another problem of not having an integrated transit system.
        >
        > >2. Drive.
        > >If you've got a car - the preferred option is obvious!
        >
        Things seem to be very corrupt in Manchester.

        This problem is partly due to Metrolink's refusal to have integrated
        ticketing with the bus companies - they do allow (heavy) rail travellers
        free onward travel across the city. Having said, that the Trams are not as
        reliable as the local politicians/media bigwigs would have us believe, so
        there would still be the problem of long waits and missed connections.
      • Ronald Dawson
        ... Oddly enough in Luton, Labour is pretty auto friendly as well and the Liberals & Tories are more pro transit.
        Message 3 of 8 , Apr 5, 2001
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          philip@... wrote:
          >> are there any other examples of strategic link roads in
          >> city
          >> >centres (perfectly wide enough for buses), where buses have been
          >> banned,
          >> >but private vehicles, vans and lorries are still allowed? This happens
          >> on
          >> >a section of High Street, Manchester,

          >>No offence, but it seems really odd to ban buses from the city centre.

          >Not to the car/tram-obsessed Labour politicians running the city, I'm
          >afraid.

          Oddly enough in Luton, Labour is pretty auto friendly as well and the
          Liberals & Tories are more pro transit.
          http://www.netmark.co.uk/cgi-local/newspro/viewnews.cgi?newsid985453410,3137
          1,

          >> >1a. Continue to get the bus to the eastern peripheral terminus (fare
          >> £7 a
          >> >week any distance for the vast majority of users), and then walk up to
          >> a
          >> >mile crossing the city streets where motorists ignore illegal turns and
          >> >pedestrian-phased lights, and the chances of being hit by a pavement
          >> >cyclist is high.
          >>
          >> That's sad and your police seem to be very inept.

          >They simply aren't around. They would see it as minor offences (until
          >someone is killed), and to be fair to them, they are stretched. Manchester
          >has 30% less Police Officers per head than London, for instance.

          The city would gain revenue if they were issuing tickets.

          >> >1b. Continue to get the bus to the same point, walk about 100 yards,
          >> wait
          >> >for an unknown length of time for a tram that isn't full, pay an
          >> >additional £7.40 a week, then a further walk to your connecting
          >> bus/office
          >> >desk.
          >>
          >> That's another problem of not having an integrated transit system.
          >>
          >> >2. Drive.
          >> >If you've got a car - the preferred option is obvious!
          >
          >>Things seem to be very corrupt in Manchester.

          >This problem is partly due to Metrolink's refusal to have integrated
          >ticketing with the bus companies - they do allow (heavy) rail travellers
          >free onward travel across the city.

          Who is allowing this problem to persist?

          >Having said, that the Trams are not as
          >reliable as the local politicians/media bigwigs would have us believe, so
          >there would still be the problem of long waits and missed connections.

          So the entire system is totally f$&%ed up, in other words. Dawson
        • Ronald Dawson
          ... (public ... being ... of ... Sorry for the late response, but it sounds like a question of axle weight. One way around this could be the use of mini buses,
          Message 4 of 8 , Apr 8, 2001
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            Andrew Preble wrote:
            >In the French Quarter in New Orleans, all buses and trucks are banned
            (public
            >and private) because of the sensitivity of the old houses and old streets
            being
            >constantly shaken by the heavy vehicles. Private cars are allowed on half
            of
            >it while the other half is car/bus/truck free.

            Sorry for the late response, but it sounds like a question of axle weight.
            One way around this could be the use of mini buses, the STCUM
            http://www.stcum.qc.ca uses such buses for similar reasons in
            Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue. Dawson

            http://home.cc.umanitoba.ca/~wyatt/alltime/pics/cit_roussillon.html
            http://www.blue-bird.com/smallbuses.html
            http://www.daimlerchrysler.com/index_e.htm?/news/top/2000/t00815b_e.htm
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