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RE: [carfree_cities] Auto Insurance?

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  • philip@aal.cix.co.uk
    ... No. I meant, *I* was being trivial. ... That s sensible. In Britain (well northern England, at least) we do all urban roadworks in the winter, when
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 4, 2001
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      > Philip wrote:
      > >> Train companies are expected to ask for compensation for the
      > > disruption to their timetables.
      >
      > >A somewhat trivial point in the context of such a tragedy,
      >
      > I know, but it's just that it seemed so odd.

      No. I meant, *I* was being trivial.

      > >but note that
      > >neither bus passengers nor operators can claim for disruption to their
      > >journeys caused by long-term roadworks etc.
      >
      > Doing road work is some thing else (it's like in Montreal we have two
      > seasons, winter and construction), you'll know about it and can plan
      > ahead.

      That's sensible. In Britain (well northern England, at least) we do all
      urban roadworks in the winter, when commuting traffic is at its worst, and
      the weather causes problems. Conversely, the Motorways seem to have
      roadworks in the Summer, when everyone is using them to go on Holiday etc.
      Barmy!
    • Chris Bradshaw
      ... I believe in Canada and the U.S., there is an upper limit that an insurer will pay, $2 million or $5 million. ... In Ottawa about 7-8 years ago, a
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 4, 2001
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        > Driver's insurer may face £40m bill for British rail disaster
        > GNER and Freightliner could seek up to £12m for the trains involved in the
        > collision – although four of the nine passenger coaches and the locomotive
        > at the back of the train may be salvageable.

        I believe in Canada and the U.S., there is an upper limit that an
        insurer will pay,
        $2 million or $5 million.

        > It is possible that re-insurers might try to mitigate their liability by
        > claiming that the Highways Agency should have erected more barriers to
        > ensure that runaway vehicles could not end up on the tracks.

        In Ottawa about 7-8 years ago, a semi-trailer truck left the main
        freeway just
        before the road crossed the transitway. It fell into the transitway
        trench where
        they was an adjacent public sidewalk, killing two people and critically
        injuring a
        third (two mothers were walking with two children in a stroller). The
        main
        emphasis of the investigation was the lack of proper road barriers to
        prevent the
        dire consequences that did result.

        In this case, the driver is surely responsible for his vehicle leaving
        the roadway,
        but not for the significance of the consequences that resulted in this
        particular
        case. I think the road and RR authorities will be held responsible for
        a
        significant portion of the damages, at least they would if this had
        taken place in
        N. America.

        Chris Bradshaw, Ottawa
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