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Flip side of induced demand

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  • Richard Risemberg
    Yet another article citing numerous cases where removing motor vehicle capacity actually reduced congestion--includes freeway removals. This is the flip side
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 3, 2012
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      Yet another article citing numerous cases where removing motor vehicle capacity actually reduced congestion--includes freeway removals. This is the flip side of "induced demand," a well-known phenomenon among traffic engineers whereby adding capacity entices more people to drive more miles and thus cause more congestion.

      http://www.onestreet.org/resources-for-increasing-bicycling/115-traffic-evaporation
      --
      Richard Risemberg
      http://www.bicyclefixation.com
      http://www.SustainableCityNews.com
      http://www.rickrise.com
    • Jym Dyer
      http://www.onestreet.org/resources-for-increasing-bicycling/115-traffic-evaporation =v= Thanks, I try to explain traffic evaporation (and Braess s Paradox) to
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 3, 2012
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        http://www.onestreet.org/resources-for-increasing-bicycling/115-traffic-evaporation

        =v= Thanks, I try to explain traffic evaporation (and Braess's
        Paradox) to people, and it would be nice to have a resource like
        this to point to. I find that a lot of people can grasp induced
        demand, but any notion of removing car accommodation will strike
        fear into the very depths of their petroleum-powered being.

        =v= San Francisco has seen traffic evaporation on a grander
        scale than the parklet mentioned in the video at the website.
        Two freeways were damaged in the 1989 earthquake, and parts
        were eventually torn down. The local media freaked out, and
        even predicted "post-apocalyptic" traffic conditions, but it
        didn't materialize. Instead we saw traffic evaporation.
        <_Jym_>
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