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Re: [carfree_cities] Tallinn city to Poll Citizens on Free Public Transport

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  • Mari Jüssi
    Current proposal from the mayor is that it will be free only for local residents and not people who are commuting in from other municipalities or tourists. So
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 31, 2012
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      Current proposal from the mayor is that it will be free only for local
      residents and not people who are commuting in from other municipalities or
      tourists.
      So this will not make the point for savings from ticket sales and controls.
      Currently hardly anyone buys tickets from drivers because it is made
      relatively more expensive to buy it on the bus compared to kiosk or mobile
      ticket


      Mari

      On 31 January 2012 16:24, J.H. Crawford <mailbox@...> wrote:

      > **
      >
      >
      >
      > Mari said:
      >
      > >Tallinn (capital of Estonia) City government will Poll Citizens on Free
      > >Public Transport this March
      > >
      > ><http://news.err.ee/society/ecb6cbaf-3521-4bcf-8979-570dcfe8ab87>
      > http://news.err.ee/society/ecb6cbaf-3521-4bcf-8979-570dcfe8ab87
      >
      > I suppose that this proposal will actually cost nearly
      > nothing. Here's why:
      >
      > Most fares are already discounted or free so the revenue
      > loss is not so great.
      >
      > The fare recovery ratio is only 40%.
      >
      > The costs of collecting a fare are large for both the
      > transit operator and the passenger. Nearly all bus
      > operations are delayed by fare collection (BRT is an
      > exception). This directly increases operating costs.
      > The cost of printing, collecting, and checking tickets
      > is quite significant, and often quite expensive machines
      > must be purchased and maintained. Dealing with all of
      > the coins collected also costs some money.
      >
      > For the passenger, time is wasted (a lot of it). The need
      > to always have exact change or a ticket or transit pass
      > in hand is a substantial irritation and time consumer.
      >
      > The fear of "doing something wrong" and getting caught
      > without a valid ticket, even when a good-faith effort
      > was made, is a subtle deterrent to the use of public
      > transport. Most people would be acutely embarrassed if
      > caught traveling on an invalid ticket.
      >
      > Transfers are bad enough without adding the complication
      > of additional fare payment and transfer tokens or scrip.
      >
      > So, even though the direct savings to the passengers may
      > not be all that great, I think the increase in ridership
      > may be greater than expected (although probably not huge).
      >
      > I see this as a win-win approach and have long advocated
      > free urban public transport.
      >
      > This story ought to go to the Free Public Transport
      > organization. I don't have a contact handy.
      >
      > Best,
      >
      > Joel
      >
      > ----- ### -----
      > J.H. Crawford
      > mailbox@...
      > http://www.carfree.com
      > Twitter: http://twitter.com/carfreecities
      > Video channels:
      > http://vimeo.com/jhcrawford/videos
      > http://www.youtube.com/user/CarfreeCities
      >
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • J.H. Crawford
      Thanks for the clarification, Mari. Maybe some of the advantages of a truly free system can be put forward to the local government. (One strategy, used in
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 31, 2012
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        Thanks for the clarification, Mari.

        Maybe some of the advantages of a truly free system
        can be put forward to the local government.

        (One strategy, used in Switzerland, is to include a
        transit tax in the price of hotel rooms, so tourists
        pay for it.)

        J.


        At 2012-01-31 09:34, you wrote:
        >
        >
        >Current proposal from the mayor is that it will be free only for local
        >residents and not people who are commuting in from other municipalities or
        >tourists.
        >So this will not make the point for savings from ticket sales and controls.
        >Currently hardly anyone buys tickets from drivers because it is made
        >relatively more expensive to buy it on the bus compared to kiosk or mobile
        >ticket
        >
        >Mari
        >
        >On 31 January 2012 16:24, J.H. Crawford <<mailto:mailbox%40carfree.com>mailbox@...> wrote:
        >
        >> **
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >> Mari said:
        >>
        >> >Tallinn (capital of Estonia) City government will Poll Citizens on Free
        >> >Public Transport this March
        >> >
        >> ><<http://news.err.ee/society/ecb6cbaf-3521-4bcf-8979-570dcfe8ab87>http://news.err.ee/society/ecb6cbaf-3521-4bcf-8979-570dcfe8ab87>
        >> http://news.err.ee/society/ecb6cbaf-3521-4bcf-8979-570dcfe8ab87
        >>
        >> I suppose that this proposal will actually cost nearly
        >> nothing. Here's why:
        >>
        >> Most fares are already discounted or free so the revenue
        >> loss is not so great.
        >>
        >> The fare recovery ratio is only 40%.
        >>
        >> The costs of collecting a fare are large for both the
        >> transit operator and the passenger. Nearly all bus
        >> operations are delayed by fare collection (BRT is an
        >> exception). This directly increases operating costs.
        >> The cost of printing, collecting, and checking tickets
        >> is quite significant, and often quite expensive machines
        >> must be purchased and maintained. Dealing with all of
        >> the coins collected also costs some money.
        >>
        >> For the passenger, time is wasted (a lot of it). The need
        >> to always have exact change or a ticket or transit pass
        >> in hand is a substantial irritation and time consumer.
        >>
        >> The fear of "doing something wrong" and getting caught
        >> without a valid ticket, even when a good-faith effort
        >> was made, is a subtle deterrent to the use of public
        >> transport. Most people would be acutely embarrassed if
        >> caught traveling on an invalid ticket.
        >>
        >> Transfers are bad enough without adding the complication
        >> of additional fare payment and transfer tokens or scrip.
        >>
        >> So, even though the direct savings to the passengers may
        >> not be all that great, I think the increase in ridership
        >> may be greater than expected (although probably not huge).
        >>
        >> I see this as a win-win approach and have long advocated
        >> free urban public transport.
        >>
        >> This story ought to go to the Free Public Transport
        >> organization. I don't have a contact handy.
        >>
        >> Best,
        >>
        >> Joel
        >>
        >> ----- ### -----
        >> J.H. Crawford
        >> <mailto:mailbox%40carfree.com>mailbox@...
        >> http://www.carfree.com
        >> Twitter: <http://twitter.com/carfreecities>http://twitter.com/carfreecities
        >> Video channels:
        >> <http://vimeo.com/jhcrawford/videos>http://vimeo.com/jhcrawford/videos
        >> http://www.youtube.com/user/CarfreeCities
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >
        >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >



        ----- ### -----
        J.H. Crawford
        mailbox@...
        http://www.carfree.com
        Twitter: http://twitter.com/carfreecities
        Video channels:
        http://vimeo.com/jhcrawford/videos
        http://www.youtube.com/user/CarfreeCities
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