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Re: [carfree_cities] Re: small houses

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  • Jym Dyer
    ... =v= Which city? Or do you mean a city with such laws in general? =v= San Francisco has a one parking space per unit policy for new construction.
    Message 1 of 6 , Nov 15, 2010
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      >> See the CNN video on small houses in Tokyo:
      > local "forced parking" laws frequently require more space
      > devoted to parking than to actual building space. I've
      > said before, half jokingly, that you could brick in the
      > parking spaces the city forced your house to come with
      > and wind up with more floor space than the house itself.

      =v= Which city? Or do you mean a city with such laws in
      general?

      =v= San Francisco has a one parking space per unit policy
      for new construction. Developers typically design in even
      more parking than that. (Shortly before he died, Don Fisher,
      the evil CEO of the GAP who used to take his billions from
      sweatshop labor to meddle in S.F. politics, tried to ram
      through a ballot measure to give this policy the force of
      law. The citizens roundly rejected that.)

      =v= After years and years, this requirement has been relaxed
      for one small region of the city, a zone where there's lots
      of transit, where it's relatively flat (for easy bicycling),
      and where a lot of households are already carfree. What is
      a minimum in the rest of the city is the maximum there.

      =v= Even so, developers generally plan in too much parking,
      since that's how they're accustomed to thinking. They ask
      for variances because they (everyone whine in unison now)
      neeeeeeeeeeeeeed parking, and so far the city has granted
      every variance. :^(

      =v= There are a handful of developers coming up with designs
      that don't have that much parking, but overall progress is
      ridiculously slow.
      <_Jym_>
    • mdh6214
      This is Tallahassee, FL, which is 100% sprawl, zero anything else. You can probably find the same legal absurdity in many American cities. Even downtown ,
      Message 2 of 6 , Nov 15, 2010
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        This is Tallahassee, FL, which is 100% sprawl, zero anything else. You can probably find the same legal absurdity in many American cities. Even "downtown", almost every building has attacked parking, and you can walk clear across downtown during rush hour and be the only non-homeless pedestrian.

        A quick check with the municipal code, and we have minimums, but no maximums. Variances are available, but I doubt they're granted. At one ordinance hearing, I mentioned the fact that many college students don't have cars, and I got blank stares.

        Houses: 2 spaces per house; 3 if it's 4 bedrooms; add one more if there's no on-street parking within 100'.

        Apartments: 1.5 spaces per studio; 2 per 1-bedroom; 2.5 per 2+ bedroom. 1:10 bicycle:vehicle spaces required.

        Mobile home parks: 2.25 spaces per unit.

        It gets even more absurd for commercial parking:

        "4 spaces/alley plus 2 for each billiard table plus required parking for other uses on the site."

        My personal favorite: elementary and middle schools. 2 spaces per classroom, 5:1 bicycle:vehicle parking (!), and "Bicycle spaces for teachers and visitors should be separate from spaces for students". High schools require one space per employee, 1 space per 6 students, and only 1:1 bicycle to vehicle parking spaces. In other words, high school students are expected to dump the bike and drive.

        Given that a local mall has several hundred parking spaces that receive zero use even on "Black Friday", they're probably chomping at the bit to not be told how many parking spaces they must provide.

        > =v= Which city? Or do you mean a city with such laws in
        > general?
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