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Re: [carfree_cities] CFT #055: Buses vs Streetcars

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  • Chris Bradshaw
    Having bus and rail-transit routes parallel each other isn t that odd. They are two different kinds of transit. Rapid transit usually runs on rights-of-way
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 6, 2009
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      Having bus and rail-transit routes parallel each other isn't that odd.

      They are two different kinds of transit. "Rapid transit" usually runs on
      rights-of-way that don't provide access to destinatons along busy main
      streets, and the stations are fairly far apart (allowing faster _average_
      speeds -- but making it less transit-like). Those wanting to access those
      locations in-between the rapid-transit stations, would either have to walk
      very far, or transfer to the bus system. And those going shorter distances
      along that corridor will use only the bus.

      It shows how silly "rapid transit" is for most transit trips, except the
      very long trips. Very long trips -- mostly commuting to jobs or university
      campuses -- are encourged by the flat-fare system, while those taking short
      rides have a choice: either subsidize the longer trips, or avoid using
      transit. The elderly, disabled, and poor with children to tote around can't
      avoid, so . . . .

      Chris Bradshaw

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "mdh6214" <matt@...>
      To: <carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Monday, September 28, 2009 16:55
      Subject: [carfree_cities] CFT #055: Buses vs Streetcars


      > Looking at the 36 points about buses vs streetcars, I've got a comment
      > about points 26 and 29.
      >
      > In cities with extensive rail transit, why does it always seem as if there
      > are bus routes that almost parallel to the rail routes? A cursory look at
      > the NYC bus map, and you see plenty of bus routes that make you ask "Why
      > would anyone ride that bus route when there's a subway?" Is there some
      > sort of political pressure for this?
      >
      > The other question is why it's so popular to run rail lines overnight with
      > buses that parallel the rail line stop-by-stop--or for that matter, for
      > there to simply be no transit for four hours a day between about 0100 and
      > 0500. I've heard that Cercanias Madrid shuts down at 2400 for "union and
      > safety" reasons, and here in Tallahassee, StarMetro expressed concern with
      > late-night routes that serve "rough" areas of the city.
      >
      > --matt
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    • chbuckeye
      Not always -- the recently-completed Euclid Corridor bus rapid transit line has about thirty stations along it s six-mile length. The walk between stations is
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 12, 2009
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        Not always -- the recently-completed Euclid Corridor bus rapid transit line has about thirty stations along it's six-mile length. The walk between stations is fairly short.

        The buses do run in dedicated lanes, and there is no payment on the bus, it's a proof-of-payment system with ticket machines on the platform stations so boarding is faster than a regular bus. The traffic lights along the line also are coordinated with the buses to give the buses priority, all of which speeds up travel time on this route. Regular bus routes, when they run along Euclid Avenue, also use the Rapid Transit stations as stops. There is no benefit to boarding a "regular" bus instead of the buses dedicated to the BRT line, unless you intend to go somewhere off the BRT line that a particular bus might travel by.

        --- In carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com, "Chris Bradshaw" <c_bradshaw@...> wrote:
        >
        > Having bus and rail-transit routes parallel each other isn't that odd.
        >
        > They are two different kinds of transit. "Rapid transit" usually runs on
        > rights-of-way that don't provide access to destinatons along busy main
        > streets, and the stations are fairly far apart (allowing faster _average_
        > speeds -- but making it less transit-like). Those wanting to access those
        > locations in-between the rapid-transit stations, would either have to walk
        > very far, or transfer to the bus system. And those going shorter distances
        > along that corridor will use only the bus.
        >
        > It shows how silly "rapid transit" is for most transit trips, except the
        > very long trips. Very long trips -- mostly commuting to jobs or university
        > campuses -- are encourged by the flat-fare system, while those taking short
        > rides have a choice: either subsidize the longer trips, or avoid using
        > transit. The elderly, disabled, and poor with children to tote around can't
        > avoid, so . . . .
        >
        > Chris Bradshaw
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: "mdh6214" <matt@...>
        > To: <carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Monday, September 28, 2009 16:55
        > Subject: [carfree_cities] CFT #055: Buses vs Streetcars
        >
        >
        > > Looking at the 36 points about buses vs streetcars, I've got a comment
        > > about points 26 and 29.
        > >
        > > In cities with extensive rail transit, why does it always seem as if there
        > > are bus routes that almost parallel to the rail routes? A cursory look at
        > > the NYC bus map, and you see plenty of bus routes that make you ask "Why
        > > would anyone ride that bus route when there's a subway?" Is there some
        > > sort of political pressure for this?
        > >
        > > The other question is why it's so popular to run rail lines overnight with
        > > buses that parallel the rail line stop-by-stop--or for that matter, for
        > > there to simply be no transit for four hours a day between about 0100 and
        > > 0500. I've heard that Cercanias Madrid shuts down at 2400 for "union and
        > > safety" reasons, and here in Tallahassee, StarMetro expressed concern with
        > > late-night routes that serve "rough" areas of the city.
        > >
        > > --matt
        > >
        > >
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        > > Yahoo! Groups Links
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