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Green city Malmo to use... light rail, or trams?

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  • Aaron Thomas
    Hey! I m working with documentation for Malmö here in Sweden that is to re-establish that wonder of transport, rail-based electric transport. What to call it
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 1, 2009
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      Hey!
      I'm working with documentation for Malmö here in Sweden that is to
      re-establish that wonder of transport, rail-based electric transport. What
      to call it in English? I've been using LER Light Electric Rail, and also
      like light rail. But wikipedia is against that -- currently! (
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light_rail ...
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tram )
      So may I ask: If a document mentioned light electric rail or light rail,
      would any of you think that is certainly not a rail-based electric public
      transport in mixed traffic?

      with good wishes,
      Aaron


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Richard Risemberg
      ... Anywhere in the US, light rail means electric trams powered through catenaries. DMUs are rare here--i doubt one person in a thousand has heard of them.
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 11, 2009
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        On Oct 1, 2009, at 7:50 AM, Aaron Thomas wrote:

        >
        > Hey!
        > I'm working with documentation for Malmö here in Sweden that is to
        > re-establish that wonder of transport, rail-based electric
        > transport. What
        > to call it in English? I've been using LER Light Electric Rail, and
        > also
        > like light rail. But wikipedia is against that -- currently! (
        > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light_rail ...
        > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tram )
        > So may I ask: If a document mentioned light electric rail or light
        > rail,
        > would any of you think that is certainly not a rail-based electric
        > public
        > transport in mixed traffic?
        >

        Anywhere in the US, 'light rail" means electric trams powered through
        catenaries. DMUs are rare here--i doubt one person in a thousand has
        heard of them. "Trams" is also in use, but "light rail" is more common.

        "Light rail" is "light" because it does not share tracks with goods
        trains, so does not have to be built to withstand a collision with an
        8000-ton freight.

        Definition form http://lightrail.com:

        > An electric railway system, characterized by its ability to operate
        > single or multiple car consists (trains) along exclusive rights-of-
        > way at ground level, on aerial structures, in subways or in
        > streets, able to board and discharge passengers at station
        > platforms or at street, track, or car-floor level and normally
        > powered by overhead electrical wires.


        Rick

        --
        Richard Risemberg
        http://www.bicyclefixation.com
        http://www.newcolonist.com
        http://www.rickrise.com
      • bruun@seas.upenn.edu
        I would suggest using the terminology that Prof. Vuchic has spent a career trying to standardize. If it mostly runs in mixed traffic, that is, RoW C, then it
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 20, 2009
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          I would suggest using the terminology that Prof. Vuchic has spent a
          career trying to standardize.

          If it mostly runs in mixed traffic, that is, RoW C, then it is a
          streetcar or tram. If it mostly runs
          with lateral separation, but at grade, then it is RoW C and light
          rail. If it runs fully grade separated,
          RoW A, then it light rail rapid transit, or just rapid transit.

          Eric Bruun

          Quoting Richard Risemberg <rickrise@...>:

          >
          > On Oct 1, 2009, at 7:50 AM, Aaron Thomas wrote:
          >
          >>
          >> Hey!
          >> I'm working with documentation for Malmö here in Sweden that is to
          >> re-establish that wonder of transport, rail-based electric
          >> transport. What
          >> to call it in English? I've been using LER Light Electric Rail, and
          >> also
          >> like light rail. But wikipedia is against that -- currently! (
          >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light_rail ...
          >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tram )
          >> So may I ask: If a document mentioned light electric rail or light
          >> rail,
          >> would any of you think that is certainly not a rail-based electric
          >> public
          >> transport in mixed traffic?
          >>
          >
          > Anywhere in the US, 'light rail" means electric trams powered through
          > catenaries. DMUs are rare here--i doubt one person in a thousand has
          > heard of them. "Trams" is also in use, but "light rail" is more common.
          >
          > "Light rail" is "light" because it does not share tracks with goods
          > trains, so does not have to be built to withstand a collision with an
          > 8000-ton freight.
          >
          > Definition form http://lightrail.com:
          >
          >> An electric railway system, characterized by its ability to operate
          >> single or multiple car consists (trains) along exclusive rights-of-
          >> way at ground level, on aerial structures, in subways or in
          >> streets, able to board and discharge passengers at station
          >> platforms or at street, track, or car-floor level and normally
          >> powered by overhead electrical wires.
          >
          >
          > Rick
          >
          > --
          > Richard Risemberg
          > http://www.bicyclefixation.com
          > http://www.newcolonist.com
          > http://www.rickrise.com
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
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