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retrofitting urban residential streets as carfree

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  • Elizabeth Trice
    I love in Portland Maine and would like to see a system of carfree or limited car areas throughout the city, perhaps even replacing a long street through the
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 2, 2009
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      I love in Portland Maine and would like to see a system of carfree or limited car areas throughout the city, perhaps even replacing a long street through the city with a greenway. Does anyone know of any examples of a urban residential block having been onverted to car-free, or an entire street converted to greenway?
      Elizabeth






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    • Pascal van den Noort
      Times Square in New York is a great example :-) Have a look at our blog here or here:
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 3, 2009
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        Times Square in New York is a great example :-)
        Have a look at our blog here or here: http://velomondial.blogspot.com/2009/06/word-streets-interviewed-paul-white.html


        Pascal J.W. van den Noort
        Executive Director Velo Mondial

        http://velomondial.blogspot.com
        www.velomondial.net
        www.velo.info
        http://spicycles.velo.info
        operations@...

        +31206270675 landline
        +31627055688 mobile phone



        On Aug 3, 2009, at 3:06 AM, Elizabeth Trice wrote:

        > I love in Portland Maine and would like to see a system of carfree
        > or limited car areas throughout the city, perhaps even replacing a
        > long street through the city with a greenway. Does anyone know of
        > any examples of a urban residential block having been onverted to
        > car-free, or an entire street converted to greenway?
        > Elizabeth
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Aaron Thomas
        Good question Elizabeth. I am also interested in the technical solution to urban cycling mobility (i.e. one can cycle safely most anywhere one wishes.) I live
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 3, 2009
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          Good question Elizabeth. I am also interested in the technical solution to
          urban cycling mobility (i.e. one can cycle safely most anywhere one wishes.)
          I live in Lund, Sweden, a quite cyclable town. The key word is *SEGREGATION
          *of cycling lanes with other traffic forms (walking, motorised). Lack of
          segregation in some areas must be the main reason that cycling is not 100%
          safe here yet.

          I think there are published reports from Denmark and Holland that describe
          the transition / implementation of cyclability.
          One of them is here http://www.fietsberaad.nl/library/repository/bestanden/*
          CyclingintheNetherlands2009*.pdf

          The online journal World Transport Policy & Practice also has wonderful
          material on such topics, e.g. Mayer Hillman's extraordinary article The
          future of public transport: the dangers of viewing policy through
          rose-tinted spectacles<http://www.seit.ee/agenda21/english/transport/future_of_PT.pdf>

          where he explains that walking and cycling are actually very high potential
          transport modes that must be supported more, but get lost in the statistics
          and the skewed discourse that favours more monetised / commodified modes.

          with good wishes,
          Aaron



          2009/8/3 Pascal van den Noort <urbania@...>

          >
          >
          > Times Square in New York is a great example :-)
          > Have a look at our blog here or here:
          > http://velomondial.blogspot.com/2009/06/word-streets-interviewed-paul-white.html
          >
          > Pascal J.W. van den Noort
          > Executive Director Velo Mondial
          >
          > http://velomondial.blogspot.com
          > www.velomondial.net
          > www.velo.info
          > http://spicycles.velo.info
          > operations@... <operations%40velomondial.net>
          >
          > +31206270675 landline
          > +31627055688 mobile phone
          >
          >
          > On Aug 3, 2009, at 3:06 AM, Elizabeth Trice wrote:
          >
          > > I love in Portland Maine and would like to see a system of carfree
          > > or limited car areas throughout the city, perhaps even replacing a
          > > long street through the city with a greenway. Does anyone know of
          > > any examples of a urban residential block having been onverted to
          > > car-free, or an entire street converted to greenway?
          > > Elizabeth
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Ian
          There is a big problem with the argument that segregation makes cycling safer... At some point a cyclist has to make a left turn. Here on the Netherlands, I
          Message 4 of 6 , Aug 4, 2009
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            There is a big problem with the argument that segregation makes cycling safer... At some point a cyclist has to make a left turn.

            Here on the Netherlands, I see more and more three and four wheeled "bicycles" and more that pull trailers which travel slower and consumer greater width of the cycle paths, preventing faster cyclists from passing - and it is "illegal" to cycle on the road!

            In the Netherlands, segregation is purely for the motorist, to keep children and others out of their way so that they can drive faster to the next queue. Dutch drivers oppose "shared space" streets as they, more than many from less "cycling friendly" countries believe that roads are for motorised vehicles alone.

            Where motorists and cyclist share the street space, as in parts of Freiburg where there are "naked streets", traffic moves at a safer speed and motorists and cyclists of all ages co-exist safely.


            In Vauban, Freiburg, there is no segregation and here you will see "car free" streets:

            http://www.cabe.org.uk/case-studies/vauban?photos=true&viewing=2719
            http://www.livablestreets.com/streetswiki/vauban-freiburg-germany

            These are purpose built streets and people choose to live there. Converting existing streets may be more difficult, as people demand parking, but have a look at the ideas behind Woonerfs (Home zones). Unfortunately many, like "Home Zones" in the UK are just car parks with fancy paving... There are examples of houses built with no parking outside in the Netherlands. Commercial builders report that these are more difficult to sell than those with parking outside, however when a group has built its own community, the space saved from parking is utilised for the benefit of all residents as in Vauban.



            Regards,

            Ian
          • Erik Sandblom
            ... Bicycle safety is a little trickier than it may seem. Most cyclist deaths involve a car. So it s safe to say that the #1 safety issue for pedestrians and
            Message 5 of 6 , Aug 4, 2009
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              --- In carfree_cities@yahoogroups.com, Aaron Thomas <aaronkmthomas@...> wrote:
              > The key word is *SEGREGATION
              > *of cycling lanes with other traffic forms (walking, motorised). Lack of
              > segregation in some areas must be the main reason that cycling is not 100%
              > safe here yet.


              Bicycle safety is a little trickier than it may seem. Most cyclist deaths involve a car. So it's safe to say that the #1 safety issue for pedestrians and cyclists is car traffic. See pie graph
              http://www.ecoprofile.se/posts.asp?forum_id=&topic_id=995#5799

              But it doesn't automatically follow that segregated facilites are the only answer. As Ian points out, cyclists need to turn left sometimes. And when motorists turn right, they run over cyclists going straight. There is a lot of research on this:
              http://www.cyclecraft.co.uk/digest/research.html

              You mentioned the "Cycling in the Netherlands" report which draws attention to the "safety in numbers" paradox. This says that the more cyclists and pedestrians you have, the fewer deaths and serious injuries there will be. Bicycle lanes can therefore increase safety simply by encouraging people to cycle more, even though they are not really inherently safe.
              http://www.livablestreets.com/streetswiki/safety-in-numbers

              Erik Sandblom
            • Aaron Thomas
              That is a good point about left turns. I think one can still segregate even those, however, with staggered traffic signals, i.e. there is a period when only
              Message 6 of 6 , Aug 4, 2009
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                That is a good point about left turns. I think one can still segregate even
                those, however, with staggered traffic signals, i.e. there is a period when
                only the cyclists can be in the intersection. I think this is already
                practiced. Another way to create 100% segregation is to lay out a network of
                cycle paths that are not add-ons to motor roads, and use pedestrian
                crossings instead of the motor crossings when necessary.
                I personally think the naked streets / shared space / no segregation,
                signals or markings idea is an interesting experimental concept but
                extremely dangerous and requires a high level of evidential proof before
                adoption, from locality to locality and culture to culture. Cyclists and
                pedestrians across the world share space with motorised traffic nakedly, and
                the millions of deaths and tens of millions of maimed tell the terrible
                story.

                with good wishes,
                Aaron

                2009/8/4 Ian <ianenvironmental@...>

                >
                >
                >
                > There is a big problem with the argument that segregation makes cycling
                > safer... At some point a cyclist has to make a left turn.
                >
                > Here on the Netherlands, I see more and more three and four wheeled
                > "bicycles" and more that pull trailers which travel slower and consumer
                > greater width of the cycle paths, preventing faster cyclists from passing -
                > and it is "illegal" to cycle on the road!
                >
                > In the Netherlands, segregation is purely for the motorist, to keep
                > children and others out of their way so that they can drive faster to the
                > next queue. Dutch drivers oppose "shared space" streets as they, more than
                > many from less "cycling friendly" countries believe that roads are for
                > motorised vehicles alone.
                >
                > Where motorists and cyclist share the street space, as in parts of Freiburg
                > where there are "naked streets", traffic moves at a safer speed and
                > motorists and cyclists of all ages co-exist safely.
                >
                > In Vauban, Freiburg, there is no segregation and here you will see "car
                > free" streets:
                >
                > http://www.cabe.org.uk/case-studies/vauban?photos=true&viewing=2719
                > http://www.livablestreets.com/streetswiki/vauban-freiburg-germany
                >
                > These are purpose built streets and people choose to live there. Converting
                > existing streets may be more difficult, as people demand parking, but have a
                > look at the ideas behind Woonerfs (Home zones). Unfortunately many, like
                > "Home Zones" in the UK are just car parks with fancy paving... There are
                > examples of houses built with no parking outside in the Netherlands.
                > Commercial builders report that these are more difficult to sell than those
                > with parking outside, however when a group has built its own community, the
                > space saved from parking is utilised for the benefit of all residents as in
                > Vauban.
                >
                > Regards,
                >
                > Ian
                >
                >
                >


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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