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Sport utility bikes: a comparison

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  • Richard Risemberg
    Quite something to see this article in the automotive section of the Los Angeles Times! ... Sport utility bikes: a comparison ... October 6 2008 When gas
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 7, 2008
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      Quite something to see this article in the automotive section of the
      Los Angeles Times!
      --------------------
      Sport utility bikes: a comparison
      --------------------


      October 6 2008

      When gas prices gushed over $4 a gallon earlier this year, bike shops
      were (and still are) swamped with people who suddenly wanted to use
      pedal power for commuting, socializing and shopping. Attracting
      particular attention are so-called "longtails" -- extra-long SUBs
      (sport utility bikes) with welded-on racks designed to haul big,
      bulky cargo, whether it's a 200-pound load of bricks, surfboards or
      three or four bags of groceries. Here's a look at four of the most
      popular SUBs I tested at the recent Interbike trade show in Las Vegas.

      The complete article can be viewed at:
      http://www.latimes.com/classified/automotive/highway1/la-he-
      gear6-2008oct06,0,7756408.story

      Or: http://tinyurl.com/44gbca

      Rick
      --
      Richard Risemberg
      http://www.bicyclefixation.com
      http://www.newcolonist.com
      http://www.rickrise.com
    • Christopher Miller
      I find it really interesting how different the approach is in all the American models they illustrate, with the cargo bearing portion in the back, from
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 7, 2008
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        I find it really interesting how different
        the approach is in all the American models they illustrate, with the
        cargo bearing portion in the back, from European cargo cycles (whether
        Dutch bakfietsen, Danish ladcykler from Nihola, Christiania etc., or
        British models), all of which put a load-bearing box or platform/rack
        in the front ok the principle that this makes for better overall
        maneuverability. Even the triporteur delibery bikes used by dépanneur
        corner stores here in Montreal have cargo trays in the front, ahead of
        the handlebars.

        Thoughts?













        ••••••••••••••••••••••••
        Christopher Miller
        Montreal QC Canada
        christophermiller@...
        +1-514-568-9949












        ••••••••••••••••••••••••

        On 7-Oct-08, at 9:32 AM, Richard Risemberg <rickrise@...>
        wrote:

        > Quite something to see this article in the automotive section of the
        > Los Angeles Times!
        > --------------------
        > Sport utility bikes: a comparison
        > --------------------
        >
        > October 6 2008
        >
        > When gas prices gushed over $4 a gallon earlier this year, bike shops
        > were (and still are) swamped with people who suddenly wanted to use
        > pedal power for commuting, socializing and shopping. Attracting
        > particular attention are so-called "longtails" -- extra-long SUBs
        > (sport utility bikes) with welded-on racks designed to haul big,
        > bulky cargo, whether it's a 200-pound load of bricks, surfboards or
        > three or four bags of groceries. Here's a look at four of the most
        > popular SUBs I tested at the recent Interbike trade show in Las Vegas.
        >
        > The complete article can be viewed at:
        > http://www.latimes.com/classified/automotive/highway1/la-he-
        > gear6-2008oct06,0,7756408.story
        >
        > Or: http://tinyurl.com/44gbca
        >
        > Rick
        > --
        > Richard Risemberg
        > http://www.bicyclefixation.com
        > http://www.newcolonist.com
        > http://www.rickrise.com
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Richard Risemberg
        ... This has been a subject of much discussion on one of my bike lists. Generally it s because Americans have, for the last fifty years, preferred to buy
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 7, 2008
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          On Oct 7, 2008, at 8:29 AM, Christopher Miller wrote:

          > I find it really interesting how different
          > the approach is in all the American models they illustrate, with the
          > cargo bearing portion in the back, from European cargo cycles (whether
          > Dutch bakfietsen, Danish ladcykler from Nihola, Christiania etc., or
          > British models), all of which put a load-bearing box or platform/rack
          > in the front ok the principle that this makes for better overall
          > maneuverability. Even the triporteur delibery bikes used by dépanneur
          > corner stores here in Montreal have cargo trays in the front, ahead of
          > the handlebars.


          This has been a subject of much discussion on one of my bike lists.

          Generally it's because Americans have, for the last fifty years,
          preferred to buy racing bicycles (image thing, y'know) and racing
          bicycles, for reasons having to do with racing frame geometry, can
          carry loads well on the rear but handle horribly when front-loaded.
          So, in the US, bicyclists became accustomed to rear racks as a
          standards load carrying.

          Front loaders look "quaint" and unmanly to US riders ("Only girls
          ride with baskets"), though this is changing considerably now. A
          movement has grown over the last five years among serious riders and
          custom builders in the US to promote and provide French-style front-
          loading city bikes and Dutch-style front- (or mid-) loading cargo
          bikes. Kogswell of Minneapolis is one company that offers an
          inexpensive production model; ANT Bikes in Boston has expensive ones:

          http://www.kogswell.com/ (Taiwan made)
          http://antbikemike.com/ (US, handmade)

          The major manufacturers are slowly catching up here.

          Rick
          --
          Richard Risemberg
          http://www.bicyclefixation.com
          http://www.newcolonist.com
          http://www.rickrise.com







          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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