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Re: [carfree_cities] Carbon-neutral city planned for Jordan

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  • J.H. Crawford
    Hi Chris, This is very interesting, as it s 700,000 people. Please send my way anything further you see on this. I don t see how they can do it with cars, but
    Message 1 of 2 , May 25, 2008
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      Hi Chris,

      This is very interesting, as it's 700,000 people.

      Please send my way anything further you see on this.

      I don't see how they can do it with cars, but people
      will try the craziest things...

      Best,
      J.



      At 2008-05-24 18:55, you wrote:
      > From the Abu Dhabi newspaper The National, an article on a project n
      >Jordan from the planners of Masdar:
      >
      >http://www.thenational.ae/article/20080515/BUSINESS/547587520
      >
      >Nothing mentions whether the same car-free approach will be taken in
      >the Jordanian city but it is worth watching.
      >
      >=====================================================
      >Carbon-neutral city planned for Jordan
      >Chris Stanton
      >Last Updated: May 15. 2008 8:09PM UAE / May 15. 2008 4:09PM GMT
      >A carbon-neutral community may be built on the outskirts of the
      >capital Amman, with an initial population of 700,000 to grow to one
      >million in five years The National
      >
      >The master planners of Abu Dhabi’s carbon-neutral community were now
      >working on the launch of a modified version of the city for the
      >government of Jordan that would be more than 10 times larger, the
      >directors of the project said yesterday.
      >
      >The city would be built on the outskirts of the capital Amman, with an
      >initial population of 700,000 to grow to one million in five years,
      >said Serge Younes, a director for the UK-based WSP Group. By contrast,
      >Masdar City, which is being built near Abu Dhabi International
      >Airport, will have an initial population of 50,000 that will
      >eventually grow to 100,000.
      >“Masdar is fairly big, it’s a neighbourhood,” he said. “This project
      >is big, it’s a full city.”
      >
      >Unlike its counterpart in Abu Dhabi, the new city, which has yet to
      >receive a name, will not be zero carbon. It will, however, utilise
      >many of the same elements: waste and water will be recycled and
      >reused, housing will be built and orientated to take advantage of
      >prevailing winds and maximise energy efficiency, efficient district-
      >wide systems will handle heating and cooling, and electricity will
      >come from planned wind and solar thermal plants, or be generated on
      >site.
      >Mr Younes said Amman’s more temperate climate and ingrained habits of
      >sustainability among Jordanians made the project’s environmental goals
      >much easier to achieve than at Masdar.
      >
      >“It’s very, very nice weather and you don’t need to do as much. People
      >will happily open their windows,” he said.
      >
      >Average temperatures in Amman, which sits at an elevation of 779
      >metres, range from 12°C to 32°C throughout the year, compared with
      >23°C to 39°C in Abu Dhabi.
      >He noted that Jordanians were some of the lowest per-capita consumers
      >of water in the world, averaging 90 litres per day, per person.
      >Estimates for per capita consumption in the UAE, by contrast, range up
      >to 500 litres per day, partly because the economy here is more
      >developed.
      >
      >“In that circumstance, achieving sustainability is easier,” he said.
      >“There is not much you have to do, because they have these habits
      >already.”
      >Masdar itself will not have a hand in the Amman project. On Wednesday,
      >the company’s chief executive indicated he was not yet ready to
      >replicate the Masdar City model.
      >
      >“Yes, we have been approached by different governments and different
      >interested parties from the international market to come and develop
      >this model in their own backyards,” Sultan al Jaber said at the Abu
      >Dhabi Cityscape exhibition. “But our position today is we need to
      >produce our own city, capture the knowledge, capture the intellectual
      >property, and then we will expand it.”
      >The plans for a green city comes after King Abdullah of Jordan
      >launched a US$7 billion (Dh25.7bn) programme in February to build
      >120,000 units of housing for middle- and low-income citizens in
      >response to a housing shortage across the country.
      >
      >Mr Younes did not provide a cost estimate for the new project, which
      >will be officially unveiled in June.
      >
      >He expects contractors to break ground in December or January, and
      >deliver the first 100,000 homes five years after that.
      >The financing details for what was sure to be a multibillion-dirham
      >undertaking have yet to be finalised, Mr Younes said. He said the
      >government had signalled interest in offering shares to the public.
      >
      >“The plan is to open it up to any investor,” he said. “They’re talking
      >about an IPO, to allow any class of investors in.”
      >
      >The city’s developers will clearly not have access to the same levels
      >of funding as Masdar, which received an initial US$15 billion
      >injection of funding from Mubadala, an investment arm of the Abu Dhabi
      >Government. Jordan’s government has forecast a US$1 billion deficit
      >for its 2008 budget.
      >The project has the support of the highest levels of Jordan’s
      >government, said James Rayner, lead master planner for the
      >architectural firm BroadwayMalyan, which is developing the master plan
      >in partnership with WSP. “It’s being underwritten at a very high
      >level,” he said.
      >
      >“There’s a huge amount of investment going into Jordan right now, and
      >this project is really part of that trend.”
      >
      >The project will fill an acute need for middle-class housing in
      >Jordan, said Mr Rayner, since developers have tended to focus on the
      >luxury market.
      >“There’s a critical need to meet what the rest of the community
      >wants,” he said. “This project is very much about meeting Jordan’s
      >agenda, it’s not about making big statements.”
      >=====================================================
      >
      >
      >Christopher Miller
      >Montreal QC Canada
      >
      >
      >
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