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Carbon-neutral city planned for Jordan

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  • Christopher Miller
    From the Abu Dhabi newspaper The National, an article on a project n Jordan from the planners of Masdar:
    Message 1 of 2 , May 24, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      From the Abu Dhabi newspaper The National, an article on a project n
      Jordan from the planners of Masdar:

      http://www.thenational.ae/article/20080515/BUSINESS/547587520

      Nothing mentions whether the same car-free approach will be taken in
      the Jordanian city but it is worth watching.

      =====================================================
      Carbon-neutral city planned for Jordan
      Chris Stanton
      Last Updated: May 15. 2008 8:09PM UAE / May 15. 2008 4:09PM GMT
      A carbon-neutral community may be built on the outskirts of the
      capital Amman, with an initial population of 700,000 to grow to one
      million in five years The National

      The master planners of Abu Dhabi�s carbon-neutral community were now
      working on the launch of a modified version of the city for the
      government of Jordan that would be more than 10 times larger, the
      directors of the project said yesterday.

      The city would be built on the outskirts of the capital Amman, with an
      initial population of 700,000 to grow to one million in five years,
      said Serge Younes, a director for the UK-based WSP Group. By contrast,
      Masdar City, which is being built near Abu Dhabi International
      Airport, will have an initial population of 50,000 that will
      eventually grow to 100,000.
      �Masdar is fairly big, it�s a neighbourhood,� he said. �This project
      is big, it�s a full city.�

      Unlike its counterpart in Abu Dhabi, the new city, which has yet to
      receive a name, will not be zero carbon. It will, however, utilise
      many of the same elements: waste and water will be recycled and
      reused, housing will be built and orientated to take advantage of
      prevailing winds and maximise energy efficiency, efficient district-
      wide systems will handle heating and cooling, and electricity will
      come from planned wind and solar thermal plants, or be generated on
      site.
      Mr Younes said Amman�s more temperate climate and ingrained habits of
      sustainability among Jordanians made the project�s environmental goals
      much easier to achieve than at Masdar.

      �It�s very, very nice weather and you don�t need to do as much. People
      will happily open their windows,� he said.

      Average temperatures in Amman, which sits at an elevation of 779
      metres, range from 12�C to 32�C throughout the year, compared with
      23�C to 39�C in Abu Dhabi.
      He noted that Jordanians were some of the lowest per-capita consumers
      of water in the world, averaging 90 litres per day, per person.
      Estimates for per capita consumption in the UAE, by contrast, range up
      to 500 litres per day, partly because the economy here is more
      developed.

      �In that circumstance, achieving sustainability is easier,� he said.
      �There is not much you have to do, because they have these habits
      already.�
      Masdar itself will not have a hand in the Amman project. On Wednesday,
      the company�s chief executive indicated he was not yet ready to
      replicate the Masdar City model.

      �Yes, we have been approached by different governments and different
      interested parties from the international market to come and develop
      this model in their own backyards,� Sultan al Jaber said at the Abu
      Dhabi Cityscape exhibition. �But our position today is we need to
      produce our own city, capture the knowledge, capture the intellectual
      property, and then we will expand it.�
      The plans for a green city comes after King Abdullah of Jordan
      launched a US$7 billion (Dh25.7bn) programme in February to build
      120,000 units of housing for middle- and low-income citizens in
      response to a housing shortage across the country.

      Mr Younes did not provide a cost estimate for the new project, which
      will be officially unveiled in June.

      He expects contractors to break ground in December or January, and
      deliver the first 100,000 homes five years after that.
      The financing details for what was sure to be a multibillion-dirham
      undertaking have yet to be finalised, Mr Younes said. He said the
      government had signalled interest in offering shares to the public.

      �The plan is to open it up to any investor,� he said. �They�re talking
      about an IPO, to allow any class of investors in.�

      The city�s developers will clearly not have access to the same levels
      of funding as Masdar, which received an initial US$15 billion
      injection of funding from Mubadala, an investment arm of the Abu Dhabi
      Government. Jordan�s government has forecast a US$1 billion deficit
      for its 2008 budget.
      The project has the support of the highest levels of Jordan�s
      government, said James Rayner, lead master planner for the
      architectural firm BroadwayMalyan, which is developing the master plan
      in partnership with WSP. �It�s being underwritten at a very high
      level,� he said.

      �There�s a huge amount of investment going into Jordan right now, and
      this project is really part of that trend.�

      The project will fill an acute need for middle-class housing in
      Jordan, said Mr Rayner, since developers have tended to focus on the
      luxury market.
      �There�s a critical need to meet what the rest of the community
      wants,� he said. �This project is very much about meeting Jordan�s
      agenda, it�s not about making big statements.�
      =====================================================


      Christopher Miller
      Montreal QC Canada



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • J.H. Crawford
      Hi Chris, This is very interesting, as it s 700,000 people. Please send my way anything further you see on this. I don t see how they can do it with cars, but
      Message 2 of 2 , May 25, 2008
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        Hi Chris,

        This is very interesting, as it's 700,000 people.

        Please send my way anything further you see on this.

        I don't see how they can do it with cars, but people
        will try the craziest things...

        Best,
        J.



        At 2008-05-24 18:55, you wrote:
        > From the Abu Dhabi newspaper The National, an article on a project n
        >Jordan from the planners of Masdar:
        >
        >http://www.thenational.ae/article/20080515/BUSINESS/547587520
        >
        >Nothing mentions whether the same car-free approach will be taken in
        >the Jordanian city but it is worth watching.
        >
        >=====================================================
        >Carbon-neutral city planned for Jordan
        >Chris Stanton
        >Last Updated: May 15. 2008 8:09PM UAE / May 15. 2008 4:09PM GMT
        >A carbon-neutral community may be built on the outskirts of the
        >capital Amman, with an initial population of 700,000 to grow to one
        >million in five years The National
        >
        >The master planners of Abu Dhabi’s carbon-neutral community were now
        >working on the launch of a modified version of the city for the
        >government of Jordan that would be more than 10 times larger, the
        >directors of the project said yesterday.
        >
        >The city would be built on the outskirts of the capital Amman, with an
        >initial population of 700,000 to grow to one million in five years,
        >said Serge Younes, a director for the UK-based WSP Group. By contrast,
        >Masdar City, which is being built near Abu Dhabi International
        >Airport, will have an initial population of 50,000 that will
        >eventually grow to 100,000.
        >“Masdar is fairly big, it’s a neighbourhood,” he said. “This project
        >is big, it’s a full city.”
        >
        >Unlike its counterpart in Abu Dhabi, the new city, which has yet to
        >receive a name, will not be zero carbon. It will, however, utilise
        >many of the same elements: waste and water will be recycled and
        >reused, housing will be built and orientated to take advantage of
        >prevailing winds and maximise energy efficiency, efficient district-
        >wide systems will handle heating and cooling, and electricity will
        >come from planned wind and solar thermal plants, or be generated on
        >site.
        >Mr Younes said Amman’s more temperate climate and ingrained habits of
        >sustainability among Jordanians made the project’s environmental goals
        >much easier to achieve than at Masdar.
        >
        >“It’s very, very nice weather and you don’t need to do as much. People
        >will happily open their windows,” he said.
        >
        >Average temperatures in Amman, which sits at an elevation of 779
        >metres, range from 12°C to 32°C throughout the year, compared with
        >23°C to 39°C in Abu Dhabi.
        >He noted that Jordanians were some of the lowest per-capita consumers
        >of water in the world, averaging 90 litres per day, per person.
        >Estimates for per capita consumption in the UAE, by contrast, range up
        >to 500 litres per day, partly because the economy here is more
        >developed.
        >
        >“In that circumstance, achieving sustainability is easier,” he said.
        >“There is not much you have to do, because they have these habits
        >already.”
        >Masdar itself will not have a hand in the Amman project. On Wednesday,
        >the company’s chief executive indicated he was not yet ready to
        >replicate the Masdar City model.
        >
        >“Yes, we have been approached by different governments and different
        >interested parties from the international market to come and develop
        >this model in their own backyards,” Sultan al Jaber said at the Abu
        >Dhabi Cityscape exhibition. “But our position today is we need to
        >produce our own city, capture the knowledge, capture the intellectual
        >property, and then we will expand it.”
        >The plans for a green city comes after King Abdullah of Jordan
        >launched a US$7 billion (Dh25.7bn) programme in February to build
        >120,000 units of housing for middle- and low-income citizens in
        >response to a housing shortage across the country.
        >
        >Mr Younes did not provide a cost estimate for the new project, which
        >will be officially unveiled in June.
        >
        >He expects contractors to break ground in December or January, and
        >deliver the first 100,000 homes five years after that.
        >The financing details for what was sure to be a multibillion-dirham
        >undertaking have yet to be finalised, Mr Younes said. He said the
        >government had signalled interest in offering shares to the public.
        >
        >“The plan is to open it up to any investor,” he said. “They’re talking
        >about an IPO, to allow any class of investors in.”
        >
        >The city’s developers will clearly not have access to the same levels
        >of funding as Masdar, which received an initial US$15 billion
        >injection of funding from Mubadala, an investment arm of the Abu Dhabi
        >Government. Jordan’s government has forecast a US$1 billion deficit
        >for its 2008 budget.
        >The project has the support of the highest levels of Jordan’s
        >government, said James Rayner, lead master planner for the
        >architectural firm BroadwayMalyan, which is developing the master plan
        >in partnership with WSP. “It’s being underwritten at a very high
        >level,” he said.
        >
        >“There’s a huge amount of investment going into Jordan right now, and
        >this project is really part of that trend.”
        >
        >The project will fill an acute need for middle-class housing in
        >Jordan, said Mr Rayner, since developers have tended to focus on the
        >luxury market.
        >“There’s a critical need to meet what the rest of the community
        >wants,” he said. “This project is very much about meeting Jordan’s
        >agenda, it’s not about making big statements.”
        >=====================================================
        >
        >
        >Christopher Miller
        >Montreal QC Canada
        >
        >
        >
        >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
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        J.H. Crawford Carfree Cities
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