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Re: Dead-end streets encourage recycling

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  • Tuomo Valkonen
    ... To me the reference designs seems to be a grid-oriented one, albeit encouraging a more interesting non-rectangular grid. However, buildings are situated in
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 6, 2008
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      On 2008-04-04, kyle3054 <KyleSchuant@...> wrote:
      > Have there been other studies showing that neighbours in cul-de-sacs
      > and dead ends are more likely to know one another than those on long
      > streets?
      >
      > I mean, it seems common sense that it'd be so, and perhaps it's
      > already part of the carfree city design of the book... Anyway I
      > thought it was interesting.=20

      To me the reference designs seems to be a grid-oriented one,
      albeit encouraging a more interesting non-rectangular grid.
      However, buildings are situated in blocks around central
      courtyards. Such a courtyard might form a community of sorts,
      and the recycling bins could be shared between people located
      around a courtyard instead of a street (perhaps located along a
      semi-public path crossing the courtyard). It'd be interesting
      to compare such a situation to the cul-de-sac one.

      (As a side note, at my apartment building, I've found people
      throwing regular waste and plastic bags in the bio-waste bin.
      One can attribute not recycling and throwing everything in
      the general waste bin as laziness and indifference, but this
      seems sheer malice or illiteracy.)

      --
      Tuomo
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