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Dead-end streets encourage recycling

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  • kyle3054
    From http://environment.newscientist.com/channel/earth/dn13595-deadend-streets-encourage-recycling.html?feedId=online-news_rss20 You walk out of your house in
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 4, 2008
      From
      http://environment.newscientist.com/channel/earth/dn13595-deadend-streets-encourage-recycling.html?feedId=online-news_rss20

      "You walk out of your house in the morning and notice your neighbours
      have put their recycling out. Do you A) make a mental note to recycle
      more or B) ignore it entirely? A researcher from the University of
      Southampton, UK, suggests that most people living in cities opt for B."
      [...]
      The situation was slightly different in cul-de-sac streets and shorter
      streets of fewer than 15 houses. The shorter the street, the more
      neighbours appeared to behave in the same way. The effect was most
      pronounced in cul-de-sacs.

      "There seems to be an influence of street architecture on the
      community," says Shaw.
      *********************************
      Comment: I'd imagine that a cul-de-sac or other dead end makes people
      _feel_ more like they know their neighbours and are watching and
      watched by them, even if in fact they don't talk to them so much.

      Have there been other studies showing that neighbours in cul-de-sacs
      and dead ends are more likely to know one another than those on long
      streets?

      I mean, it seems common sense that it'd be so, and perhaps it's
      already part of the carfree city design of the book... Anyway I
      thought it was interesting.

      Cheers,
      Kyle
      http://greenwithagun.blogspot.com/
    • Tuomo Valkonen
      ... To me the reference designs seems to be a grid-oriented one, albeit encouraging a more interesting non-rectangular grid. However, buildings are situated in
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 6, 2008
        On 2008-04-04, kyle3054 <KyleSchuant@...> wrote:
        > Have there been other studies showing that neighbours in cul-de-sacs
        > and dead ends are more likely to know one another than those on long
        > streets?
        >
        > I mean, it seems common sense that it'd be so, and perhaps it's
        > already part of the carfree city design of the book... Anyway I
        > thought it was interesting.=20

        To me the reference designs seems to be a grid-oriented one,
        albeit encouraging a more interesting non-rectangular grid.
        However, buildings are situated in blocks around central
        courtyards. Such a courtyard might form a community of sorts,
        and the recycling bins could be shared between people located
        around a courtyard instead of a street (perhaps located along a
        semi-public path crossing the courtyard). It'd be interesting
        to compare such a situation to the cul-de-sac one.

        (As a side note, at my apartment building, I've found people
        throwing regular waste and plastic bags in the bio-waste bin.
        One can attribute not recycling and throwing everything in
        the general waste bin as laziness and indifference, but this
        seems sheer malice or illiteracy.)

        --
        Tuomo
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