Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [carfree_cities] Walkscore website

Expand Messages
  • Christopher Miller
    I wonder if Venice s walkability score relative to New York may be related somehow to how their calculations deal with simple grids as opposed to more complex,
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 8, 2007
      I wonder if Venice's walkability score relative to New York may be
      related somehow to how their calculations deal with simple grids as
      opposed to more complex, organic street plans. I can't help wondering
      if an old world, non-grid based street plan gets treated similarly to
      a suburban street plan (see the Walkable Neighborhoods link below).

      They do admit that there are still problems with the way walkability
      is calculated and what is taken into account. Clicking on the four
      links just below the log at the top of the page:

      Why Walking Matters | Walkable Neighborhoods | How It Works |
      How It Doesn't Work

      leads to pages that discuss these questions.

      They welcome input from other quarters and I'm sure they would not be
      adverse to getting input based on the assumptions in Carfree Cities
      and Carfree Design Manual and would probably enjoy discussing the
      merits of their model.

      Chris Miller



      On 8-Aug-07, at 3:30 PM, J.H. Crawford wrote:

      >
      > Interesting. Venice scores only 63. One Fifth Ave., NYC scores 100
      > (no surprise there). There's nothing in the index about the QUALITY
      > of the walk, only the distance (or so it appears).
      >
      > Joel
      >
      > At 2007-08-08 12:59, you wrote:
      >
      > >I just came across this on the CoolTowns blog today:
      > >
      > ><http://www.walkscore.com/index.shtml>http://www.walkscore.com/
      > index.shtml
      > >
      > >Walkscore is a Google-based web app that calculates the walkability
      > >of a neighbourhood based on an address you type in (for the US,
      > >Canada and the UK, for now). I'm sure this can come in useful for
      > >various purposes...
      > >
      > >Christopher Miller
      > >Montreal QC Canada
      > >
      > >
      >
      > ----- ### -----
      > J.H. Crawford Carfree Cities
      > mailbox@... http://www.carfree.com
      >
      >
      >



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Eric Fischer
      ... They don t actually know anything about grids -- the distances are just the distance from one point on the map to another, not the distance that you
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 8, 2007
        On 8/8/07, Christopher Miller <christophermiller@...> wrote:
        >
        > I wonder if Venice's walkability score relative to New York may be
        > related somehow to how their calculations deal with simple grids as
        > opposed to more complex, organic street plans. I can't help wondering
        > if an old world, non-grid based street plan gets treated similarly to
        > a suburban street plan (see the Walkable Neighborhoods link below).


        They don't actually know anything about grids -- the distances are just the
        distance from one point on the map to another, not the distance that you
        actually have to walk. (I think they would like to fix that, but the Google
        Maps API doesn't currently provide enough information to do so.)

        It looks Venice does badly just because Google doesn't have any business
        listings for bookstores or libraries in the area.

        Eric


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Randall Ghent
        Yes, it is an interesting and very useful tool, although the creators themselves recognize that they re working with only one factor of walkability and
        Message 3 of 5 , Aug 13, 2007
          Yes, it is an interesting and very useful tool, although the creators
          themselves recognize that they're working with only one factor of
          walkability and livability. It's simply a measure of proximity, telling you
          what shops and services are near to a given address, including the distance,
          name, description, address/phone and location of each. I think it's
          ambitious enough as it is, without its misleading name and "Find a great
          neighborhood" slogan. Even as a proximity indicator it is very much a work
          in progress in terms of businesses and services listed. And in my
          neighborhood it doesn't include post offices, parks and schools. By giving a
          score to an address at this stage in the software's development, it implies
          a level of precision that simply isn't there. But it do very well with the
          neighborhood in the U.S. where I grew up.

          "*Distance: *We are currently using 'as the crow flies' distances rather
          than walking directions. This means if you live across the lake from a
          destination, we are assuming you will swim. We are investigating using
          Google Driving Directions to calculate our distances. Hopefully, Google will
          add Walking Directions in the future!"

          I also noticed that if you type in the name of a city, it calculates for the
          most central location in that city or the city hall, not the city as a
          whole. York, UK got a 95, although my neighborhood of York got a 58. Venice,
          Italy got a 75.

          Randy

          --
          Randall Ghent
          Conference Coordinator
          WORLD CARFREE NETWORK
          home address: 20 Gale Lane
          Acomb, York YO24 3BB, U.K.
          tel: +(44) 1904 796860
          skype: randallghent
          rghent@...


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.