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Historic Ship, Historic Pollution

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  • vanousterhout
    http://www.ozaukeepress.com/editorials/3526-historic-ship-historic-pollution Historic Ship, Historic Pollution Ozaukee Press Wednesday, 31 October 2012 16:44
    Message 1 of 8 , Nov 2, 2012
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      http://www.ozaukeepress.com/editorials/3526-historic-ship-historic-pollution

      Historic Ship, Historic Pollution

      Ozaukee Press
      Wednesday, 31 October 2012 16:44
      The car ferry Badger must not be allowed to parlay its cachet as the last steamship operating into a pass to continue dumping toxic ash into Lake Michigan
      What if 50 huge, double-axel, 10-ton-capacity dump trucks backed, one after the other, across Port Washington's south beach to the water's edge and dumped a total of one million pounds of coal ash laced with mercury, arsenic and other toxic pollutants into Lake Michigan?

      Federal, state and local authorities would react ferociously. Perpetrators would be arrested. Companies involved would be fined to the point of being driven out of business. A prodigious clean-up effort would be launched. News media and the Internet would be apoplectic with outrage.

      None of that reaction has occurred, but the environmental crime described in the first paragraph was actually committed this year—just not at Port Washington and not by dump trucks.

      It was done, as it has been during every shipping season for years, by the car ferry Badger in the open waters of Lake Michigan: 500 tons of ash from the coal burned to fire its boilers dumped into Lake Michigan.

      The Badger, which crosses the lake between Manitowoc, Wis., and Ludington, Mich., has been allowed to dump its ash overboard under a special permit issued by the Environmental Protection Agency recognizing the 60-year-old ship's historic status as the last coal-fired steamship operating in the United States.

      The EPA has warned the Badger's owners for years that ash-dumping would have to stop at some point. That point has now been set at Dec. 19, 2012. The company that owns the Badger, Lake Michigan Carferry Service of Ludington, should have prepared for the deadline by converting the ship to a cleaner fuel such as natural gas. Instead, it's asking the EPA to extend the permit and trying to round up political support to be allowed to continue polluting Lake Michigan.

      Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker obliged by writing a letter to the EPA asking for a permit extension. "We hope the SS Badger can continue to sail," he wrote, "but we also hope they can do so in a manner that safeguards the waters of Lake Michigan."

      The governor's hopes are quite baffling, not to mention contradictory, in that if the Badger continues to sail under an extended permit to dump coal ash, it cannot safeguard the waters of Lake Michigan; it can only continue to harm them.

      There should be no permit extension. During its years of lake crossings, the Badger has dumped an estimated total of 3.8 million tons of toxic ash into Lake Michigan. That has to stop. The ferry's blatant acts of polluting not only damage the lake, but mock the efforts supported by citizens, lakeshore municipalities and industries to protect the quality of its water.

      The fact that the Badger has a propulsion system its owners claim to be "a national mechanical engineering landmark" cannot be a license to pollute in a manner that would be tolerated of no other business.

      According to the Badger's website, the vessel "offers an authentic steamship experience unmatched anywhere else." True enough—no other ship is allowed to dump coal ash in the Great Lakes.

      What is sad about the Badger's failure to adapt to a world that is sensitive to the need to protect a fragile environment, beyond the harm to Lake Michigan, is that putting the Badger out of service would be a loss to many who appreciate the majesty of Lake Michigan and the opportunity to cross it on a 410-foot vessel that recalls the days when car ferries crisscrossed the lake from Milwaukee, Manitowoc and Kewaunee to Frankfort, Muskegon and Ludington on the Michigan side

      The Badger should be crossing the lake at its 15.6-knot pace with boilers fired by clean fuel producing the steam to turn its 14-foot propellers.

      If its owners choose not to do that, it will be a shame. But not as big a shame as continuing to dump toxic ash into Lake Michigan.
    • Don Leistikow
      Group; Continued, rattling of Sabers. Historically, Steamships have been dumping ash for a Century or more, all over the Great Lakes and Fish are still alive,
      Message 2 of 8 , Nov 3, 2012
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        Group; Continued, rattling of Sabers.

        Historically, Steamships have been dumping ash for a Century or more,
        all over the Great Lakes and Fish are still alive, populating therin.
        While a challange now is seemingly desparate, it is more like closing
        the door after the Cat is gone.


        Another thought comes to mind, that of what is the ratio of coal to
        ashes? I doubt that it is an equal number. I would expect that the
        ratio of ashes dumped, is far less than the coal from which it came.


        It is also apparent that the public is patronizing the SS Badger so,
        there is reason to keep it in service on Lake Michigan. It's Ports of
        Call, Ludington and Manitowoc, apparently are not a competition nor a
        threat to the services of the Lake Michigan Express operating out of the
        Port of Milwaukee to Muskegon.


        Therefore, I would expect that funding can be found to convert the SS
        Badger, changing its fuel requirement to something which will no longer
        pollute Lake Michigan and the other four of the Great Lakes in turn. As
        I recall, Lake Erie is already dead. No hue nor cry was evident when
        that happened so, why now about Lake Michigan?

        As I've said previously, Asian Carp are fighting to get into Lake
        Michigan through the Illinois waterway, seemingly a worse threat to the
        fish in Lake Michigan than the dumping of ash.


        A one year or longer extension now, is not a threat to a Century old
        practice. So, let's find a Funding Program to convert the SS Badger's
        fuel requirement and keep it in service. The Commercial and Historic
        value, are quite evident.


        Don L. Leistikow
      • ken chapin
        Hi,on coal it s tested for the amount of ash,if it is 11% ash you would have 220LB of ash in a 2000LB ton of coal,lets say they burn 300 ton of coal each way
        Message 3 of 8 , Nov 3, 2012
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          Hi,on coal it's tested for the amount of ash,if it is 11% ash you would have 220LB of ash in a 2000LB ton of coal,lets say they burn 300 ton of coal each way you would have 33 tons of ash,now if you went to wood fuel pellets at 4% ash would get this down to 12 tons a trip and the ash would be cleaner,think of charcoal like in your grill,you could burn them on the grates with very little work change over from coal,it's just the price for them is about 250.00 dollars a ton without shipping were coal is about 60.00 dollars a ton.
          Ken

          To: carferry@yahoogroups.com
          CC: emory1522@...
          From: DLeistikow@...
          Date: Sat, 3 Nov 2012 15:03:06 +0000
          Subject: Re: [carferry] Historic Ship, Historic Pollution


























          Group; Continued, rattling of Sabers.



          Historically, Steamships have been dumping ash for a Century or more,

          all over the Great Lakes and Fish are still alive, populating therin.

          While a challange now is seemingly desparate, it is more like closing

          the door after the Cat is gone.



          Another thought comes to mind, that of what is the ratio of coal to

          ashes? I doubt that it is an equal number. I would expect that the

          ratio of ashes dumped, is far less than the coal from which it came.



          It is also apparent that the public is patronizing the SS Badger so,

          there is reason to keep it in service on Lake Michigan. It's Ports of

          Call, Ludington and Manitowoc, apparently are not a competition nor a

          threat to the services of the Lake Michigan Express operating out of the

          Port of Milwaukee to Muskegon.



          Therefore, I would expect that funding can be found to convert the SS

          Badger, changing its fuel requirement to something which will no longer

          pollute Lake Michigan and the other four of the Great Lakes in turn. As

          I recall, Lake Erie is already dead. No hue nor cry was evident when

          that happened so, why now about Lake Michigan?



          As I've said previously, Asian Carp are fighting to get into Lake

          Michigan through the Illinois waterway, seemingly a worse threat to the

          fish in Lake Michigan than the dumping of ash.



          A one year or longer extension now, is not a threat to a Century old

          practice. So, let's find a Funding Program to convert the SS Badger's

          fuel requirement and keep it in service. The Commercial and Historic

          value, are quite evident.



          Don L. Leistikow


















          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • PBBowers
          Hi, A few questions about the Badger s coal. How much do they burn per trip? ( 300 tons each way was noted but that seems awful high. Secondly, where is the
          Message 4 of 8 , Nov 3, 2012
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            Hi,

            A few questions about the Badger's coal. How much do they burn per
            trip? ( 300 tons each way was noted but that seems awful
            high. Secondly, where is the Badger coaled and how is coal delivered
            to that site? How is it loaded onto the vessel? Are there any
            photos on line of the coaling operation?

            I remember pre 1963 watching self unloaders (Valley Camp for
            one) coming into Owen Sound to unload coal for the Norisle and
            Norgoma. They also stockpiled coal at Tobermory for the Norisle and
            possibly/likely at the Soo for the Norgoma. It was always
            interesting watching the loading of coal into the two ships locally
            using a dragline collection system to pull coal to the conveyor and
            chute to the ship's coal bins. .

            Peter


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Erik Jonasson
            The Badger is fueled at Manitowoc. LMC has the coal stockpiled near the slip and a few trucks that load the coal a few times per week. The trailers, I believe
            Message 5 of 8 , Nov 3, 2012
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              The Badger is fueled at Manitowoc. LMC has the coal stockpiled near the slip and a few trucks that load the coal a few times per week. The trailers, I believe have unloading doors on the bottom which are dumped into the ship through grates on the car deck (roughly midships).
               
              Erik

              --- On Sat, 11/3/12, PBBowers <4everwaiting@...> wrote:


              From: PBBowers <4everwaiting@...>
              Subject: RE: [carferry] Historic Ship, Historic Pollution
              To: carferry@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Saturday, November 3, 2012, 2:31 PM



               



              Hi,

              A few questions about the Badger's coal. How much do they burn per
              trip? ( 300 tons each way was noted but that seems awful
              high. Secondly, where is the Badger coaled and how is coal delivered
              to that site? How is it loaded onto the vessel? Are there any
              photos on line of the coaling operation?

              I remember pre 1963 watching self unloaders (Valley Camp for
              one) coming into Owen Sound to unload coal for the Norisle and
              Norgoma. They also stockpiled coal at Tobermory for the Norisle and
              possibly/likely at the Soo for the Norgoma. It was always
              interesting watching the loading of coal into the two ships locally
              using a dragline collection system to pull coal to the conveyor and
              chute to the ship's coal bins. .

              Peter

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]








              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Don Leistikow
              Group: FWIW: My wife just told me that Lake Erie has been cleaned up and is now restored to a Fish Habitat. Don L .
              Message 6 of 8 , Nov 3, 2012
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                Group: FWIW: My wife just told me that Lake Erie has been cleaned up
                and is now restored to a Fish Habitat.

                Don L .
              • Don Leistikow
                Thank You, Ken Chapin: Now we re making some real progress. Getting the issue out to the public, may well be the way to a fitting solution. I had overlooked
                Message 7 of 8 , Nov 3, 2012
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                  Thank You, Ken Chapin: Now we're making some real progress.

                  Getting the issue out to the public, may well be the way to a fitting
                  solution. I had overlooked the fact that transport of the Wind Power
                  masts are shipped over Lake Michigan so, thanks for reminding me.

                  Although Wood Fuel Pellets are expensive by comparison, at least a think
                  tank is working. Perhaps a modern day approach to seek a reasonable
                  alternative to Coal, may be found so, let's keep the fire going under
                  the pot.

                  Don L .
                • jEFF Bittner
                  In the day the Badger was a railroad car ferry the coal was dumped from a rail car right into the hold. ________________________________ From: Erik Jonasson
                  Message 8 of 8 , Nov 6, 2012
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                    In the day the Badger was a railroad car ferry the coal was dumped from a rail
                    car right into the hold.






                    ________________________________
                    From: Erik Jonasson <cmstpps@...>
                    To: carferry@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Sat, November 3, 2012 2:55:11 PM
                    Subject: RE: [carferry] Historic Ship, Historic Pollution


                    The Badger is fueled at Manitowoc. LMC has the coal stockpiled near the slip and
                    a few trucks that load the coal a few times per week. The trailers, I believe
                    have unloading doors on the bottom which are dumped into the ship through grates
                    on the car deck (roughly midships).

                    Erik

                    --- On Sat, 11/3/12, PBBowers <4everwaiting@...> wrote:

                    From: PBBowers <4everwaiting@...>
                    Subject: RE: [carferry] Historic Ship, Historic Pollution
                    To: carferry@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Saturday, November 3, 2012, 2:31 PM



                    Hi,

                    A few questions about the Badger's coal. How much do they burn per
                    trip? ( 300 tons each way was noted but that seems awful
                    high. Secondly, where is the Badger coaled and how is coal delivered
                    to that site? How is it loaded onto the vessel? Are there any
                    photos on line of the coaling operation?

                    I remember pre 1963 watching self unloaders (Valley Camp for
                    one) coming into Owen Sound to unload coal for the Norisle and
                    Norgoma. They also stockpiled coal at Tobermory for the Norisle and
                    possibly/likely at the Soo for the Norgoma. It was always
                    interesting watching the loading of coal into the two ships locally
                    using a dragline collection system to pull coal to the conveyor and
                    chute to the ship's coal bins. .

                    Peter

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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