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Re: [capri26] Head sails - again?

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  • Bob White
    I bought my boat (#157) in 1991 from the Nashville Sailing Center that was located on that lake. I then moved the boat up to Cave Run in KY for about 8 years
    Message 1 of 25 , Feb 3, 2010
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      I bought my boat (#157) in 1991 from the Nashville Sailing Center that was located on that lake.  I then moved the boat up to Cave Run in KY for about 8 years until settling it back down on Grand Lake, OK.
       
      Bob White,
      Tulsa
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Gary Pack
      Sent: Wednesday, February 03, 2010 7:31 PM
      Subject: Re: [capri26] Head sails - again?

       

      Bob, I am on Percy Priest lake near the Nashville airport.  It is a Corps of Engineers lake with no private houses on the shore.  Nearby Old Hickory lake has houses on the shore, if that is what you are looking for.  There are many lakes in TN with nearby retirement communities.  Most are in East TN.  While they are nice, typically the sailing isn’t as good as it is here in Middle TN.  I am familiar with a number of lakes in TN and would be glad try to answer any questions you may have.

      Gary


      On 2/3/10 6:46 PM, "Bob Unkel" <unkel@...> wrote:


       
       
         

      Gary,
      What lake in Tenn do you sail?  I have driven around at lot of them with thoughts of a possible retirement location.

      Thanks,
      Bob Unkel

      Sent from my iPod

      On Feb 3, 2010, at 5:43 PM, Gary Pack <sailman@comcast. net> wrote:


         

      Stephen, I would think a 150 would be fine.  I sail on an inland lake in Tennessee where wind varies all over the board.  I have a Cruising Direct main and 150 that are a few seasons old and use a furler.  I find the 150 is easy to use and desirable most of the time, even at wind approaching 20.  I’ll reef the main before I reef the 150.  Helps on the weather helm issue when the wind picks up.  The cut on the sails is very flat.  I presume that will be the case with most new sails since that apparently is the trend.  Therefore, a new sail will be much more efficient than a stretched out old sail and won’t be overpowered as easily.  It all depends on what your predominant wind speeds are.  I haven’t had any backwinding problems on the main.  

      On Richard’s  furler discussion, pointing is compromised when you use a furler.  With the CDI furler, there is no downhaul on the luff.  So when the wind picks up, unless you have a downhaul installed, you can’t flatten out the luff, which in turn results in the sail becoming overpowered sooner.  A furler with the rotating ring fitting at the top which connects to your jib halyard, allows you to control the tension on the sail.   I replaced my CDI and found the weight of the new furler to be considerably lighter than the CDI and the ability to control the luff tension really helped control the sail shape.     

      Unless you are a serious racer or perfectionist, I think the ease of use of a furler out weighs the extra few degrees of pointing.  I also discovered that if you barberhaul the sheet in a few inches, you can improve pointing with the 150.

      Gary Pack, Breezin’ Bye


      On 2/3/10 8:24 AM, "Stephen M. Hollingsworth" <stephen_m_h@ earthlink. com> wrote:


       
       
         

      Ok Guys, I’m about to pull the trigger on a new North headsail (roller furler) and based on some responses from the group back in Sept, I was sold on a 150 but now I’m reading that a 135 might be the right size for our rigs.  All opinions are welcomed!!!! !
       
      fyi, like any Midwest lake, average winds cover the entire range from 0 to 20.
       
       
      Stephen
       

      From: capri26@yahoogroups .com [mailto:capri26@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of cavelamb
      Sent: Tuesday, February 02, 2010 9:56 PM
      To: capri26@yahoogroups .com
      Subject: Re: [capri26] Head sails - again?

        

      Hi Uncle Bob!

      I have an asym spinnaker for down wind and reaching in light air..

      I've flown it solo.  It's a hand full getting it set, but then it settles down.
      While we are not actually really racing, it's WAY fun to pass the other boats!

      For reaching, and especially for beating, about 135 is as large as I'd go for a fore sail.
      Aerodynamics being what they are, at some point the trade off between jib shape and
      backwinded main are going to be less than optimal.

      I'm not so sure I could actually change head sails on the foil while under weigh.
      That's an interesting job even at the dock with someone helping.
      Under weigh - and solo???
      I think I'd need to be a lot better sailor first.

      But!
       I hear you re: folding and putting them away.
      Thanks for bringing that up.  It's something to consider...

      I took the Genoa down Monday to do some stitching.
      (It really needs to be replaced, but it's going to have to wait another season)

      That thing really is a whole fore deck full of sail!


      So, yet another question...

      Does anybody here have a CDI furler with the ball bearings?
      Are they worth the bucks?


      Richard



      Bob Unkel wrote:

        

      Richard,

       

       A lot depends on what type of sailing you do. If it is racing, then go for the hanked on headsails. If not my vote would be to keep the furler. Some things to consider if you switch back to hanked on sails. First you now have to find a place to store them, second it will take you more effort to get underway and to put it all away.  There is no doubt that you can get better sail shape with hanked on sails compared to ones on a furler.  Depending on the furler, you can  reduce sail with the various sails in your inventory. We still bend our sails on every time we go sailing, as I am now getting older it is more a pain in the butt to dig out the sails and get ready to get underway then have to go through proper folding them to put them away when we come back in.  Finally, I would think about limiting yourself to only a 135 genoa,  I think the bigger the better in light air.

       

      Just one old geezers opinion,

      Bob Unkel

       

      On Feb 2, 2010, at 6:27 PM, the saber Tooth Cave lamb wrote:



        

      I'm just about to bite the bullet and pull the CDI roller
      off of my boat and go back to hank on sails.

      Discussing that idea with a neighbor on my pier (he has a V&C 27)
      we just about came to an agreement for a trade.

      His 3 hank on head sails (storm jib, working blade, and 135 Genoa) for
      my furler and Genoa.

      But I'm wondering if I should do that to a friend?
      Total stranger, maybe.
      But a friend and neighbor?

      Richard

       

       
        

         


    • Artstree@aol.com
      You have received or will be receiving your February 2010 Mainsheet. Usually the Tech article goes through fairly clean but this edition they shortened the
      Message 2 of 25 , Feb 4, 2010
      You have received or will be receiving your February 2010 Mainsheet. Usually the Tech article goes through fairly clean but this edition they shortened the article and from what I have heard , had printing issues as well. I knew the article was to be shortened but they even reformatted the pictures and dropped a lot out. So I have attached the full article submitted and I will load it along with my the earlier articles onto the web site.
       
      Richard Lamb provided a lot of input for the article and I would like to recognized and thank him for his efforts.
       
      I hope you have enjoyed the past articles and if you have ideas for future ones, please let me know.

      Art Harden, CCSA Commodore
      Sea Belle - Capri 26 ~#151
      937.885.9380 (o)
      937.477.5544 (m)
    • cavelamb
      Ok, after all the discussion, I m going to sit tight on tossing the roller furler. At least for this next season. We are not moving to the coast to go sail
      Message 3 of 25 , Feb 4, 2010
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        Ok, after all the discussion, I'm going to sit tight on tossing the
        roller furler.
        At least for this next season. We are not moving to the coast to go
        sail this summer
        (bummer) but will stay here n Texoma (which is not bad as lakes go, so -
        yea!)

        I called CDI this afternoon and talked to Tom Livingston about all this.

        Since my main complaint was rolling in high winds (approx 30 mph?)
        he suggested that I check my forestay / backstay tension.
        With that kind of load a little bit of curvature in the foil could cause
        all kinds of problems
        trying to get the furl started.

        He also told me that my rig should be a FF-4 instead of -1. And how to
        unpin the drum
        to gain access to the turnbuckle.

        Yesterday, I was going to change out the halyard while the sail was off
        of the
        foil. But when I got to taking the halyard down I found a molded on
        plastic slide
        on the halyard. Regular old 1/4" line won't do. So I ordered a new
        halyard from
        CDI ($60) today.

        The ball bearings for the -4 are a bit more expensive that for the -1.
        $160 verses $60. That will have to wait a while. Getting the sail all
        fixed up
        is more important right now.


        Richard
      • Stephen M. Hollingsworth
        First, I would like to thank everyone for your thoughts. It s been very helpful. I Spoke with my North rep and just wanted to share his feedback. Main: In
        Message 4 of 25 , Feb 4, 2010
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          First, I would like to thank everyone for your thoughts. It’s been very helpful.

           

          I Spoke with my North rep and just wanted to share his feedback.

           

          Main:

          In regards to the cut of a North main for the Capri and mast bend. North cuts the cloth for a 1” pre-bend with max bend of 3”.

           

          Headsail:

          Response from North on Headsail size. I wanted them to address the backwind issue sometimes seen on the Capri and larger headsails.

          The Capri 26 fore-triangle of ~3.5/1 and main @ 2.5:1 certainly is not an extreme for a mast head boat, if anything the lower aspect main and higher aspect genoa makes it that much easier to carry a larger overlapping headsail because the leech doesn’t come back as far along the foot of the main.  In very generic terms until you get past a point of 50% overlap on the main (half way back along the foot of the main) your fine and the 155% will only be ~ 40% overlapping the main. Almost all the #1 racing genoas we’ve built for the Capri 26 are 155%

           

           

           

           

           

          Stephen

           

          From: capri26@yahoogroups.com [mailto:capri26@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of splets@...
          Sent: Wednesday, February 03, 2010 8:27 PM
          To: capri26@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [capri26] Head sails - again?

           

           

          I have lots of sails and I agree that the boat sails incredibly well with a 110, it is my favorite sail combo. In fact the guys at the lake hate it when I use the 110 and kick their butts, when they are using bigger headsails! I am going to take the 135 to the lake this weekend for the first time and see how it does. The 155 is nice, but the back winding issues are real and when the wind comes up, I reef the main first before I switch to a smaller headsail.

          Happy sailing!!

          Splets

          Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry


          From: "Leighton D. westlake, Jr., PE, PLS" <leighton@...>

          Date: Wed, 3 Feb 2010 20:17:48 -0500

          To: <capri26@yahoogroups.com>

          Subject: RE: [capri26] Head sails - again?

           

           

          I have been taking in the discussions of headsails on the Capri 26.

           

          After racing both course and offshore with the 26, I find that a 105 or 110 jib is satisfactory and gives superb performance in all wind conditions.  Remember the J and I dimensions are disparent on the 26 and it will sail more like a fractional rig such as a J24.  The main is the driving force, the jib merely directs the wind and increases the velocity and lift across the main. 

           

          A larger jib, say over 135 at the most, will just backwind the main.  A large jib is only useful running wing on wing but that is very trying, especially with a whisker pole.  It severely limits the maneuverability of the boat. 

           

          The 105 or 110 will do just fine.

           

          As to changing sails underway, you will need a dual track foil on the head stay such as a Tuffluff or a roller furler such as a Harken.  The Cruising Designs roller furler will not help as it has only one track.  The CD furler is a furler – not a reefer.  You need a Harken or similar furling system designed for reefing and a headsail that is constructed for roller reefing that has padding to maintain the shape.

           

          With a dual track system bring the boat onto a tack such that the windward luff groove has the sail.  Raise the new sail in the leeward groove and trim.  Drop the old sail and bring it down the new sail on the windward side.  It should come down in good enough order to stow in the sail bag with a little finesse. Remember you will need double sheets and halyards.  One set for each sail.

           

          I have seen inexperienced sailors try to “baldhead” change a sail under extreme conditions.  It was dangerous and resulted in a $2500 Mylar sail being destroyed and a couple broken fingers.  Using the procedure described above, the sail change can be made with little danger and will seem as if it were easy.

           

          If you have a 155 or so, I do.  I found that flying it like an asymmetrical spinnaker works very well.  Just tack the sail and run it like a spinnaker.  It avoids the backwinding problem by allowing the sail to be farther from the main.  I did this in a “non-spinnaker” race and as we rounded the leeward mark, raised a 105 in the luff groove and rounded the mark and cut away the 155 in a cutaway douse like a spinnaker and blew everyone’s mind and also any hopes they had of winning.  We luffed one boat while they were still trying to get control of the whisker pole and ended up with the jib plastered onto their mast. Grinding to a halt as we sailed away.

           

          In short use no more than a 135 and sail like a fractional rig.  Pay attention to the main.  Dennis Conner noted this his book “Sail like a Champion”.  He notes that a fractional rig has so little lift from the jib that the loss of a jib does not hurt the speed of a fractional boat but is disastrous for a masthead boat.  The 26 is a masthead boat but is dimensioned as a fractional rig.  Sail like a fractional rig.

           

          “Rompidas”, Sail No. USA-5

           

          Signature-LDW

          Leighton Danis Westlake, Jr., PE, PLS

          Managing Partner

          a division of DANIS LOGO

          10175 Flag Dr, Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410-4775

          Tel:  561-799-5280

          Fax: 561-799-5776

          Cell: 561-222-0714

          email: leighton@...

           

          Privilaged Correspondence

           

          This e-mail and any attachments are intended only for the named recipient(s) and may contain information that is legally privileged, confidential, or exempt from disclosure under applicable law. If you have received this message in error, or are not the named recipient(s), you may not retain copy or use this e-mail or any attachment for any purpose or disclose all or any part of the contents to any other person. Any such dissemination, distribution or copying of this e-mail or its attachments is strictly prohibited. Please immediately notify the sender and permanently delete this e-mail and any attachment from your computer.

           

           

          From: capri26@yahoogroups.com [mailto:capri26@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Gary Pack
          Sent: Wednesday, February 03, 2010 5:44 PM
          To: capri26@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [capri26] Head sails - again?

           

           

          Stephen, I would think a 150 would be fine.  I sail on an inland lake in Tennessee where wind varies all over the board.  I have a Cruising Direct main and 150 that are a few seasons old and use a furler.  I find the 150 is easy to use and desirable most of the time, even at wind approaching 20.  I’ll reef the main before I reef the 150.  Helps on the weather helm issue when the wind picks up.  The cut on the sails is very flat.  I presume that will be the case with most new sails since that apparently is the trend.  Therefore, a new sail will be much more efficient than a stretched out old sail and won’t be overpowered as easily.  It all depends on what your predominant wind speeds are.  I haven’t had any backwinding problems on the main.  

          On Richard’s  furler discussion, pointing is compromised when you use a furler.  With the CDI furler, there is no downhaul on the luff.  So when the wind picks up, unless you have a downhaul installed, you can’t flatten out the luff, which in turn results in the sail becoming overpowered sooner.  A furler with the rotating ring fitting at the top which connects to your jib halyard, allows you to control the tension on the sail.   I replaced my CDI and found the weight of the new furler to be considerably lighter than the CDI and the ability to control the luff tension really helped control the sail shape.     

          Unless you are a serious racer or perfectionist, I think the ease of use of a furler out weighs the extra few degrees of pointing.  I also discovered that if you barberhaul the sheet in a few inches, you can improve pointing with the 150.

          Gary Pack, Breezin’ Bye


          On 2/3/10 8:24 AM, "Stephen M. Hollingsworth" <stephen_m_h@...> wrote:


           
           
             

          Ok Guys, I’m about to pull the trigger on a new North headsail (roller furler) and based on some responses from the group back in Sept, I was sold on a 150 but now I’m reading that a 135 might be the right size for our rigs.  All opinions are welcomed!!!!!
           
          fyi, like any Midwest lake, average winds cover the entire range from 0 to 20.
           
           
          Stephen
           

          From: capri26@yahoogroups.com [mailto:capri26@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of cavelamb
          Sent: Tuesday, February 02, 2010 9:56 PM
          To: capri26@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [capri26] Head sails - again?

            

          Hi Uncle Bob!

          I have an asym spinnaker for down wind and reaching in light air..

          I've flown it solo.  It's a hand full getting it set, but then it settles down.
          While we are not actually really racing, it's WAY fun to pass the other boats!

          For reaching, and especially for beating, about 135 is as large as I'd go for a fore sail.
          Aerodynamics being what they are, at some point the trade off between jib shape and
          backwinded main are going to be less than optimal.

          I'm not so sure I could actually change head sails on the foil while under weigh.
          That's an interesting job even at the dock with someone helping.
          Under weigh - and solo???
          I think I'd need to be a lot better sailor first.

          But!
           I hear you re: folding and putting them away.
          Thanks for bringing that up.  It's something to consider...

          I took the Genoa down Monday to do some stitching.
          (It really needs to be replaced, but it's going to have to wait another season)

          That thing really is a whole fore deck full of sail!


          So, yet another question...

          Does anybody here have a CDI furler with the ball bearings?
          Are they worth the bucks?


          Richard



          Bob Unkel wrote:


            

          Richard,

           

           A lot depends on what type of sailing you do. If it is racing, then go for the hanked on headsails. If not my vote would be to keep the furler. Some things to consider if you switch back to hanked on sails. First you now have to find a place to store them, second it will take you more effort to get underway and to put it all away.  There is no doubt that you can get better sail shape with hanked on sails compared to ones on a furler.  Depending on the furler, you can  reduce sail with the various sails in your inventory. We still bend our sails on every time we go sailing, as I am now getting older it is more a pain in the butt to dig out the sails and get ready to get underway then have to go through proper folding them to put them away when we come back in.  Finally, I would think about limiting yourself to only a 135 genoa,  I think the bigger the better in light air.

           

          Just one old geezers opinion,

          Bob Unkel

           

          On Feb 2, 2010, at 6:27 PM, the saber Tooth Cave lamb wrote:



            

          I'm just about to bite the bullet and pull the CDI roller
          off of my boat and go back to hank on sails.

          Discussing that idea with a neighbor on my pier (he has a V&C 27)
          we just about came to an agreement for a trade.

          His 3 hank on head sails (storm jib, working blade, and 135 Genoa) for
          my furler and Genoa.

          But I'm wondering if I should do that to a friend?
          Total stranger, maybe.
          But a friend and neighbor?

          Richard

           

        • R Agar
          Another aspect of ease of roller furling is your furling line. I replaced the original (1/4 inch?) with a 5/16th inch double braid. Then, you pull out the
          Message 5 of 25 , Feb 4, 2010
          • 0 Attachment
            Another aspect of ease of roller furling is your furling line.  I replaced the original (1/4 inch?) with a 5/16th inch double braid.  Then, you pull out the center braid of the section that winds up on the drum.  This gives you the easier on the hands 5/16th braid (fuzzy braid is even nicer) to pull on but the smaller (and still plenty strong enough) outer braid only to give a smaller braid wound up on the drum.  Works almost as well as a winch, even without the ball-bearing added to the CDI furling drum.
             
            Rick (with the shrunken Capri)
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Thursday, February 04, 2010 4:49 PM
            Subject: RE: [capri26] Head sails - again?

             

            First, I would like to thank everyone for your thoughts. It’s been very helpful.

            I Spoke with my North rep and just wanted to share his feedback.

            Main:

            In regards to the cut of a North main for the Capri and mast bend. North cuts the cloth for a 1” pre-bend with max bend of 3”.

            Headsail:

            Response from North on Headsail size. I wanted them to address the backwind issue sometimes seen on the Capri and larger headsails.

            The Capri 26 fore-triangle of ~3.5/1 and main @ 2.5:1 certainly is not an extreme for a mast head boat, if anything the lower aspect main and higher aspect genoa makes it that much easier to carry a larger overlapping headsail because the leech doesn’t come back as far along the foot of the main.  In very generic terms until you get past a point of 50% overlap on the main (half way back along the foot of the main) your fine and the 155% will only be ~ 40% overlapping the main. Almost all the #1 racing genoas we’ve built for the Capri 26 are 155%

            Stephen

            From: capri26@yahoogroups .com [mailto:capri26@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of splets@...
            Sent: Wednesday, February 03, 2010 8:27 PM
            To: capri26@yahoogroups .com
            Subject: Re: [capri26] Head sails - again?

             

            I have lots of sails and I agree that the boat sails incredibly well with a 110, it is my favorite sail combo. In fact the guys at the lake hate it when I use the 110 and kick their butts, when they are using bigger headsails! I am going to take the 135 to the lake this weekend for the first time and see how it does. The 155 is nice, but the back winding issues are real and when the wind comes up, I reef the main first before I switch to a smaller headsail.

            Happy sailing!!

            Splets

            Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry


            From: "Leighton D. westlake, Jr., PE, PLS" <leighton@thedanisgr oup.com>

            Date: Wed, 3 Feb 2010 20:17:48 -0500

            To: <capri26@yahoogroups .com>

            Subject: RE: [capri26] Head sails - again?

             

            I have been taking in the discussions of headsails on the Capri 26.

            After racing both course and offshore with the 26, I find that a 105 or 110 jib is satisfactory and gives superb performance in all wind conditions.  Remember the J and I dimensions are disparent on the 26 and it will sail more like a fractional rig such as a J24.  The main is the driving force, the jib merely directs the wind and increases the velocity and lift across the main. 

            A larger jib, say over 135 at the most, will just backwind the main.  A large jib is only useful running wing on wing but that is very trying, especially with a whisker pole.  It severely limits the maneuverability of the boat. 

            The 105 or 110 will do just fine.

            As to changing sails underway, you will need a dual track foil on the head stay such as a Tuffluff or a roller furler such as a Harken.  The Cruising Designs roller furler will not help as it has only one track.  The CD furler is a furler – not a reefer.  You need a Harken or similar furling system designed for reefing and a headsail that is constructed for roller reefing that has padding to maintain the shape.

            With a dual track system bring the boat onto a tack such that the windward luff groove has the sail.  Raise the new sail in the leeward groove and trim.  Drop the old sail and bring it down the new sail on the windward side.  It should come down in good enough order to stow in the sail bag with a little finesse. Remember you will need double sheets and halyards.  One set for each sail.

            I have seen inexperienced sailors try to “baldhead” change a sail under extreme conditions.  It was dangerous and resulted in a $2500 Mylar sail being destroyed and a couple broken fingers.  Using the procedure described above, the sail change can be made with little danger and will seem as if it were easy.

            If you have a 155 or so, I do.  I found that flying it like an asymmetrical spinnaker works very well.  Just tack the sail and run it like a spinnaker.  It avoids the backwinding problem by allowing the sail to be farther from the main.  I did this in a “non-spinnaker” race and as we rounded the leeward mark, raised a 105 in the luff groove and rounded the mark and cut away the 155 in a cutaway douse like a spinnaker and blew everyone’s mind and also any hopes they had of winning.  We luffed one boat while they were still trying to get control of the whisker pole and ended up with the jib plastered onto their mast. Grinding to a halt as we sailed away.

            In short use no more than a 135 and sail like a fractional rig.  Pay attention to the main.  Dennis Conner noted this his book “Sail like a Champion”.  He notes that a fractional rig has so little lift from the jib that the loss of a jib does not hurt the speed of a fractional boat but is disastrous for a masthead boat.  The 26 is a masthead boat but is dimensioned as a fractional rig.  Sail like a fractional rig.

            “Rompidas”, Sail No. USA-5

            Signature-LDW

            Leighton Danis Westlake, Jr., PE, PLS

            Managing Partner

            a division of DANIS LOGO

            10175 Flag Dr, Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410-4775

            Tel:  561-799-5280

            Fax: 561-799-5776

            Cell: 561-222-0714

            email: leighton@thedanisgr oup.com

            Privilaged Correspondence

            This e-mail and any attachments are intended only for the named recipient(s) and may contain information that is legally privileged, confidential, or exempt from disclosure under applicable law. If you have received this message in error, or are not the named recipient(s) , you may not retain copy or use this e-mail or any attachment for any purpose or disclose all or any part of the contents to any other person. Any such dissemination, distribution or copying of this e-mail or its attachments is strictly prohibited. Please immediately notify the sender and permanently delete this e-mail and any attachment from your computer.

            From: capri26@yahoogroups .com [mailto:capri26@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Gary Pack
            Sent: Wednesday, February 03, 2010 5:44 PM
            To: capri26@yahoogroups .com
            Subject: Re: [capri26] Head sails - again?

             

            Stephen, I would think a 150 would be fine.  I sail on an inland lake in Tennessee where wind varies all over the board.  I have a Cruising Direct main and 150 that are a few seasons old and use a furler.  I find the 150 is easy to use and desirable most of the time, even at wind approaching 20.  I’ll reef the main before I reef the 150.  Helps on the weather helm issue when the wind picks up.  The cut on the sails is very flat.  I presume that will be the case with most new sails since that apparently is the trend.  Therefore, a new sail will be much more efficient than a stretched out old sail and won’t be overpowered as easily.  It all depends on what your predominant wind speeds are.  I haven’t had any backwinding problems on the main.  

            On Richard’s  furler discussion, pointing is compromised when you use a furler.  With the CDI furler, there is no downhaul on the luff.  So when the wind picks up, unless you have a downhaul installed, you can’t flatten out the luff, which in turn results in the sail becoming overpowered sooner.  A furler with the rotating ring fitting at the top which connects to your jib halyard, allows you to control the tension on the sail.   I replaced my CDI and found the weight of the new furler to be considerably lighter than the CDI and the ability to control the luff tension really helped control the sail shape.     

            Unless you are a serious racer or perfectionist, I think the ease of use of a furler out weighs the extra few degrees of pointing.  I also discovered that if you barberhaul the sheet in a few inches, you can improve pointing with the 150.

            Gary Pack, Breezin’ Bye


            On 2/3/10 8:24 AM, "Stephen M. Hollingsworth" <stephen_m_h@ earthlink. com> wrote:


             
             
               

            Ok Guys, I’m about to pull the trigger on a new North headsail (roller furler) and based on some responses from the group back in Sept, I was sold on a 150 but now I’m reading that a 135 might be the right size for our rigs.  All opinions are welcomed!!!! !
             
            fyi, like any Midwest lake, average winds cover the entire range from 0 to 20.
             
             
            Stephen
             

            From: capri26@yahoogroups .com [mailto:capri26@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of cavelamb
            Sent: Tuesday, February 02, 2010 9:56 PM
            To: capri26@yahoogroups .com
            Subject: Re: [capri26] Head sails - again?

              

            Hi Uncle Bob!

            I have an asym spinnaker for down wind and reaching in light air..

            I've flown it solo.  It's a hand full getting it set, but then it settles down.
            While we are not actually really racing, it's WAY fun to pass the other boats!

            For reaching, and especially for beating, about 135 is as large as I'd go for a fore sail.
            Aerodynamics being what they are, at some point the trade off between jib shape and
            backwinded main are going to be less than optimal.

            I'm not so sure I could actually change head sails on the foil while under weigh.
            That's an interesting job even at the dock with someone helping.
            Under weigh - and solo???
            I think I'd need to be a lot better sailor first.

            But!
             I hear you re: folding and putting them away.
            Thanks for bringing that up.  It's something to consider...

            I took the Genoa down Monday to do some stitching.
            (It really needs to be replaced, but it's going to have to wait another season)

            That thing really is a whole fore deck full of sail!


            So, yet another question...

            Does anybody here have a CDI furler with the ball bearings?
            Are they worth the bucks?


            Richard



            Bob Unkel wrote:


              

            Richard,

             

             A lot depends on what type of sailing you do. If it is racing, then go for the hanked on headsails. If not my vote would be to keep the furler. Some things to consider if you switch back to hanked on sails. First you now have to find a place to store them, second it will take you more effort to get underway and to put it all away.  There is no doubt that you can get better sail shape with hanked on sails compared to ones on a furler.  Depending on the furler, you can  reduce sail with the various sails in your inventory. We still bend our sails on every time we go sailing, as I am now getting older it is more a pain in the butt to dig out the sails and get ready to get underway then have to go through proper folding them to put them away when we come back in.  Finally, I would think about limiting yourself to only a 135 genoa,  I think the bigger the better in light air.

             

            Just one old geezers opinion,

            Bob Unkel

             

            On Feb 2, 2010, at 6:27 PM, the saber Tooth Cave lamb wrote:



              

            I'm just about to bite the bullet and pull the CDI roller
            off of my boat and go back to hank on sails.

            Discussing that idea with a neighbor on my pier (he has a V&C 27)
            we just about came to an agreement for a trade.

            His 3 hank on head sails (storm jib, working blade, and 135 Genoa) for
            my furler and Genoa.

            But I'm wondering if I should do that to a friend?
            Total stranger, maybe.
            But a friend and neighbor?

            Richard

             

          • Gary Pack
            Interesting comments from all. Thanks for all of the info. Gary Breezin¹ Bye On 2/4/10 3:49 PM, Stephen M. Hollingsworth ...
            Message 6 of 25 , Feb 4, 2010
            • 0 Attachment
              Re: [capri26] Head sails - again? Interesting comments from all.  Thanks for all of the info.

              Gary

              Breezin’ Bye


              On 2/4/10 3:49 PM, "Stephen M. Hollingsworth" <stephen_m_h@...> wrote:


               
               
                 

              First, I would like to thank everyone for your thoughts. It’s been very helpful.
               
              I Spoke with my North rep and just wanted to share his feedback.
               
              Main:
              In regards to the cut of a North main for the Capri and mast bend. North cuts the cloth for a 1” pre-bend with max bend of 3”.
               
              Headsail:
              Response from North on Headsail size. I wanted them to address the backwind issue sometimes seen on the Capri and larger headsails.
              The Capri 26 fore-triangle of ~3.5/1 and main @ 2.5:1 certainly is not an extreme for a mast head boat, if anything the lower aspect main and higher aspect genoa makes it that much easier to carry a larger overlapping headsail because the leech doesn’t come back as far along the foot of the main.  In very generic terms until you get past a point of 50% overlap on the main (half way back along the foot of the main) your fine and the 155% will only be ~ 40% overlapping the main. Almost all the #1 racing genoas we’ve built for the Capri 26 are 155%
               
               
               
               
               
              Stephen
               

              From: capri26@yahoogroups.com [mailto:capri26@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of splets@...
              Sent: Wednesday, February 03, 2010 8:27 PM
              To: capri26@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [capri26] Head sails - again?

                

              I have lots of sails and I agree that the boat sails incredibly well with a 110, it is my favorite sail combo. In fact the guys at the lake hate it when I use the 110 and kick their butts, when they are using bigger headsails! I am going to take the 135 to the lake this weekend for the first time and see how it does. The 155 is nice, but the back winding issues are real and when the wind comes up, I reef the main first before I switch to a smaller headsail.

              Happy sailing!!

              Splets

              Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry


              From: "Leighton D. westlake, Jr., PE, PLS" <leighton@...>

              Date: Wed, 3 Feb 2010 20:17:48 -0500

              To: <capri26@yahoogroups.com>

              Subject: RE: [capri26] Head sails - again?

               
                

              I have been taking in the discussions of headsails on the Capri 26.
               
              After racing both course and offshore with the 26, I find that a 105 or 110 jib is satisfactory and gives superb performance in all wind conditions.  Remember the J and I dimensions are disparent on the 26 and it will sail more like a fractional rig such as a J24.  The main is the driving force, the jib merely directs the wind and increases the velocity and lift across the main.  
               
              A larger jib, say over 135 at the most, will just backwind the main.  A large jib is only useful running wing on wing but that is very trying, especially with a whisker pole.  It severely limits the maneuverability of the boat.  
               
              The 105 or 110 will do just fine.
               
              As to changing sails underway, you will need a dual track foil on the head stay such as a Tuffluff or a roller furler such as a Harken.  The Cruising Designs roller furler will not help as it has only one track.  The CD furler is a furler – not a reefer. You need a Harken or similar furling system designed for reefing and a headsail that is constructed for roller reefing that has padding to maintain the shape.
               
              With a dual track system bring the boat onto a tack such that the windward luff groove has the sail.  Raise the new sail in the leeward groove and trim.  Drop the old sail and bring it down the new sail on the windward side.  It should come down in good enough order to stow in the sail bag with a little finesse. Remember you will need double sheets and halyards.  One set for each sail.
               
              I have seen inexperienced sailors try to “baldhead” change a sail under extreme conditions.  It was dangerous and resulted in a $2500 Mylar sail being destroyed and a couple broken fingers.  Using the procedure described above, the sail change can be made with little danger and will seem as if it were easy.
               
              If you have a 155 or so, I do.  I found that flying it like an asymmetrical spinnaker works very well.  Just tack the sail and run it like a spinnaker.  It avoids the backwinding problem by allowing the sail to be farther from the main.  I did this in a “non-spinnaker” race and as we rounded the leeward mark, raised a 105 in the luff groove and rounded the mark and cut away the 155 in a cutaway douse like a spinnaker and blew everyone’s mind and also any hopes they had of winning.  We luffed one boat while they were still trying to get control of the whisker pole and ended up with the jib plastered onto their mast. Grinding to a halt as we sailed away.
               
              In short use no more than a 135 and sail like a fractional rig.  Pay attention to the main.  Dennis Conner noted this his book “Sail like a Champion”.  He notes that a fractional rig has so little lift from the jib that the loss of a jib does not hurt the speed of a fractional boat but is disastrous for a masthead boat.  The 26 is a masthead boat but is dimensioned as a fractional rig.  Sail like a fractional rig.
               
              “Rompidas”, Sail No. USA-5
               


              Leighton Danis Westlake, Jr., PE, PLS
              Managing Partner
              a division of
              10175 Flag Dr, Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410-4775
              Tel:  561-799-5280
              Fax: 561-799-5776
              Cell: 561-222-0714
              email: leighton@...
               

              Privilaged Correspondence


              This e-mail and any attachments are intended only for the named recipient(s) and may contain information that is legally privileged, confidential, or exempt from disclosure under applicable law. If you have received this message in error, or are not the named recipient(s), you may not retain copy or use this e-mail or any attachment for any purpose or disclose all or any part of the contents to any other person. Any such dissemination, distribution or copying of this e-mail or its attachments is strictly prohibited. Please immediately notify the sender and permanently delete this e-mail and any attachment from your computer.
               


              From: capri26@yahoogroups.com [mailto:capri26@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Gary Pack
              Sent: Wednesday, February 03, 2010 5:44 PM
              To: capri26@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [capri26] Head sails - again?

               

              Stephen, I would think a 150 would be fine.  I sail on an inland lake in Tennessee where wind varies all over the board.  I have a Cruising Direct main and 150 that are a few seasons old and use a furler.  I find the 150 is easy to use and desirable most of the time, even at wind approaching 20.  I’ll reef the main before I reef the 150.  Helps on the weather helm issue when the wind picks up.  The cut on the sails is very flat.  I presume that will be the case with most new sails since that apparently is the trend.  Therefore, a new sail will be much more efficient than a stretched out old sail and won’t be overpowered as easily.  It all depends on what your predominant wind speeds are.  I haven’t had any backwinding problems on the main.  

              On Richard’s  furler discussion, pointing is compromised when you use a furler.  With the CDI furler, there is no downhaul on the luff.  So when the wind picks up, unless you have a downhaul installed, you can’t flatten out the luff, which in turn results in the sail becoming overpowered sooner.  A furler with the rotating ring fitting at the top which connects to your jib halyard, allows you to control the tension on the sail.   I replaced my CDI and found the weight of the new furler to be considerably lighter than the CDI and the ability to control the luff tension really helped control the sail shape.     

              Unless you are a serious racer or perfectionist, I think the ease of use of a furler out weighs the extra few degrees of pointing.  I also discovered that if you barberhaul the sheet in a few inches, you can improve pointing with the 150.

              Gary Pack, Breezin’ Bye


              On 2/3/10 8:24 AM, "Stephen M. Hollingsworth" <stephen_m_h@...> wrote:



               
               
                 

              Ok Guys, I’m about to pull the trigger on a new North headsail (roller furler) and based on some responses from the group back in Sept, I was sold on a 150 but now I’m reading that a 135 might be the right size for our rigs.  All opinions are welcomed!!!!!
               
              fyi, like any Midwest lake, average winds cover the entire range from 0 to 20.
               
               
              Stephen
               

              From: capri26@yahoogroups.com [mailto:capri26@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of cavelamb
              Sent: Tuesday, February 02, 2010 9:56 PM
              To: capri26@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [capri26] Head sails - again?

                

              Hi Uncle Bob!

              I have an asym spinnaker for down wind and reaching in light air..

              I've flown it solo.  It's a hand full getting it set, but then it settles down.
              While we are not actually really racing, it's WAY fun to pass the other boats!

              For reaching, and especially for beating, about 135 is as large as I'd go for a fore sail.
              Aerodynamics being what they are, at some point the trade off between jib shape and
              backwinded main are going to be less than optimal.

              I'm not so sure I could actually change head sails on the foil while under weigh.
              That's an interesting job even at the dock with someone helping.
              Under weigh - and solo???
              I think I'd need to be a lot better sailor first.

              But!
               I hear you re: folding and putting them away.
              Thanks for bringing that up.  It's something to consider...

              I took the Genoa down Monday to do some stitching.
              (It really needs to be replaced, but it's going to have to wait another season)

              That thing really is a whole fore deck full of sail!


              So, yet another question...

              Does anybody here have a CDI furler with the ball bearings?
              Are they worth the bucks?


              Richard



              Bob Unkel wrote:

                

              Richard,

               

               A lot depends on what type of sailing you do. If it is racing, then go for the hanked on headsails. If not my vote would be to keep the furler. Some things to consider if you switch back to hanked on sails. First you now have to find a place to store them, second it will take you more effort to get underway and to put it all away.  There is no doubt that you can get better sail shape with hanked on sails compared to ones on a furler.  Depending on the furler, you can  reduce sail with the various sails in your inventory. We still bend our sails on every time we go sailing, as I am now getting older it is more a pain in the butt to dig out the sails and get ready to get underway then have to go through proper folding them to put them away when we come back in.  Finally, I would think about limiting yourself to only a 135 genoa,  I think the bigger the better in light air.

               

              Just one old geezers opinion,

              Bob Unkel

               

              On Feb 2, 2010, at 6:27 PM, the saber Tooth Cave lamb wrote:



                

              I'm just about to bite the bullet and pull the CDI roller
              off of my boat and go back to hank on sails.

              Discussing that idea with a neighbor on my pier (he has a V&C 27)
              we just about came to an agreement for a trade.

              His 3 hank on head sails (storm jib, working blade, and 135 Genoa) for
              my furler and Genoa.

              But I'm wondering if I should do that to a friend?
              Total stranger, maybe.
              But a friend and neighbor?

              Richard

               

               
                 


            • Bob Unkel
              Steven, Thanks for checking with North. This is the same info I received from them when bought my 170 several years ago. We had a good discussion concerning
              Message 7 of 25 , Feb 5, 2010
              • 0 Attachment
                Steven,

                Thanks for checking with North. This is the same info I received from them when bought my 170 several years ago.  We had a good discussion concerning overlap and the slot because I bought a 170 to go with my 150.  Back winding is generally more a function of  improper trim. If a large Genoa is sheeted to the cabin top track on the Capri 26 the sheeting angle is too tight. The main can also cause it by not being flat enough when close hauled or not sheeted in enough with regard to the trim of the genoa.  If the genoa if blown out and the leech line is too tight causing the genoa to be cupped at the leech, this can also cause back winding.

                Chapter 2 in the book "The Best of Sail Trim" by Sail Magazine is Genoa Overlap by John R. Stanton. It states that "It is essential that the air stream leaving the genoa leech flow be parallel to or slightly convergent with the adjacent mainsail section. A flow that is too strongly convergent will 'backwind' the mainsail and reduce its effectiveness while a divergent flow results in a loss of genoa drive and possible stalling along the mainsail's foot, which increases drag."  "As a general rule, the trim angle for a 150% LP masthead genoa should be at least 7 degrees greater than the trim angle measured between the centerline and the mainsail boom.

                As for sheeting angle, there is a difference between the actual angle of the chord of the sail and the location of the actual sheeting point on the boat. Since the Clew of the sail is not attached directly to the actual sheeting point on the boat the two angles can differ depending on the length of the jib sheet.  This same book has another chapter on "Sheeting Angles" by Bruce Dyson. It states "To get equal angles of attack, the 35% sail must have a narrower lead angle than a 50% sail." It also states "If the draft is too far forward in the main the 50% jib can cause excess backwinding and choke the slot."

                If you really want to get a good education on sail trim, North has some seminars that are great. I have attended several of them. They used to have one called "Fast U" which dealt with getting your boat to go fast. It spent a lot of time of sail trim. I think they now combine into their racing seminars.  There are also lots of books available including "Sail Power" by wallace Ross and "Sails" by Jeremy Howard Williams which I found to be good ones on some of the science.

                As for the mast bend on the Capri, the original Catalina mast tuning instructions for the Capri 26 stated "Prebend of 2 to 4 inches bow forward in the center of the mast".  Catalina Yachts, Engineering EB 29 dated April 23, 1992 covering Mast Tuning, Hulls no. 237 and Lower calls for a 1-1/2" prebend. (one and one half inches). This is the same bulletin that is furnished with the shim kit to solve the problem of masts that actually bowed aft rather than forward.  

                As for mast rake, the manual for the Capri says the "rake is approximately 4" inches.  On my boat I found that this gave me too much weather helm and I reduced the rake on my boat.  This subject caused a spirited discussion in the past.

                When you sail in light wind conditions and are trying to win a race, all these factors are important. If you are cruising and sailing in stronger winds, then you don't need to pay as much attention to all these details.  If you can get to hull speed with a 135 then you don't need a 150 or a 170. If you can't get to hull speed with the 135, then you need a bigger sail or get used to going slower than you are capable. What you need to race versus just going down the lake soaking up sun and beer are not always the same thing! 

                Regards,
                Bob

                On Feb 4, 2010, at 4:49 PM, Stephen M. Hollingsworth wrote:

                 

                First, I would like to thank everyone for your thoughts. It’s been very helpful.

                 

                I Spoke with my North rep and just wanted to share his feedback.

                 

                Main:

                In regards to the cut of a North main for the Capri and mast bend. North cuts the cloth for a 1” pre-bend with max bend of 3”.

                 

                Headsail:

                Response from North on Headsail size. I wanted them to address the backwind issue sometimes seen on the Capri and larger headsails.

                The Capri 26 fore-triangle of ~3.5/1 and main @ 2.5:1 certainly is not an extreme for a mast head boat, if anything the lower aspect main and higher aspect genoa makes it that much easier to carry a larger overlapping headsail because the leech doesn’t come back as far along the foot of the main.  In very generic terms until you get past a point of 50% overlap on the main (half way back along the foot of the main) your fine and the 155% will only be ~ 40% overlapping the main. Almost all the #1 racing genoas we’ve built for the Capri 26 are 155%

                 

                 

                 

                 

                 

                Stephen

                 

                From: capri26@yahoogroups .com [mailto:capri26@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of splets@...
                Sent: Wednesday, February 03, 2010 8:27 PM
                To: capri26@yahoogroups .com
                Subject: Re: [capri26] Head sails - again?

                 

                 

                I have lots of sails and I agree that the boat sails incredibly well with a 110, it is my favorite sail combo. In fact the guys at the lake hate it when I use the 110 and kick their butts, when they are using bigger headsails! I am going to take the 135 to the lake this weekend for the first time and see how it does. The 155 is nice, but the back winding issues are real and when the wind comes up, I reef the main first before I switch to a smaller headsail.

                Happy sailing!!

                Splets

                Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry


                From: "Leighton D. westlake, Jr., PE, PLS" <leighton@thedanisgr oup.com>

                Date: Wed, 3 Feb 2010 20:17:48 -0500

                To: <capri26@yahoogroups .com>

                Subject: RE: [capri26] Head sails - again?

                 

                 

                I have been taking in the discussions of headsails on the Capri 26.

                 

                After racing both course and offshore with the 26, I find that a 105 or 110 jib is satisfactory and gives superb performance in all wind conditions.  Remember the J and I dimensions are disparent on the 26 and it will sail more like a fractional rig such as a J24.  The main is the driving force, the jib merely directs the wind and increases the velocity and lift across the main. 

                 

                A larger jib, say over 135 at the most, will just backwind the main.  A large jib is only useful running wing on wing but that is very trying, especially with a whisker pole.  It severely limits the maneuverability of the boat. 

                 

                The 105 or 110 will do just fine.

                 

                As to changing sails underway, you will need a dual track foil on the head stay such as a Tuffluff or a roller furler such as a Harken.  The Cruising Designs roller furler will not help as it has only one track.  The CD furler is a furler – not a reefer.  You need a Harken or similar furling system designed for reefing and a headsail that is constructed for roller reefing that has padding to maintain the shape.

                 

                With a dual track system bring the boat onto a tack such that the windward luff groove has the sail.  Raise the new sail in the leeward groove and trim.  Drop the old sail and bring it down the new sail on the windward side.  It should come down in good enough order to stow in the sail bag with a little finesse. Remember you will need double sheets and halyards.  One set for each sail.

                 

                I have seen inexperienced sailors try to “baldhead” change a sail under extreme conditions.  It was dangerous and resulted in a $2500 Mylar sail being destroyed and a couple broken fingers.  Using the procedure described above, the sail change can be made with little danger and will seem as if it were easy.

                 

                If you have a 155 or so, I do.  I found that flying it like an asymmetrical spinnaker works very well.  Just tack the sail and run it like a spinnaker.  It avoids the backwinding problem by allowing the sail to be farther from the main.  I did this in a “non-spinnaker” race and as we rounded the leeward mark, raised a 105 in the luff groove and rounded the mark and cut away the 155 in a cutaway douse like a spinnaker and blew everyone’s mind and also any hopes they had of winning.  We luffed one boat while they were still trying to get control of the whisker pole and ended up with the jib plastered onto their mast. Grinding to a halt as we sailed away.

                 

                In short use no more than a 135 and sail like a fractional rig.  Pay attention to the main.  Dennis Conner noted this his book “Sail like a Champion”.  He notes that a fractional rig has so little lift from the jib that the loss of a jib does not hurt the speed of a fractional boat but is disastrous for a masthead boat.  The 26 is a masthead boat but is dimensioned as a fractional rig.  Sail like a fractional rig.

                 

                “Rompidas”, Sail No. USA-5

                 

                <image001.jpg>

                Leighton Danis Westlake, Jr., PE, PLS

                Managing Partner

                <image002.jpg>a division of <image003.jpg>

                10175 Flag Dr, Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410-4775

                Tel:  561-799-5280

                Fax: 561-799-5776

                Cell: 561-222-0714

                email: leighton@thedanisgr oup.com

                 

                Privilaged Correspondence

                 

                This e-mail and any attachments are intended only for the named recipient(s) and may contain information that is legally privileged, confidential, or exempt from disclosure under applicable law. If you have received this message in error, or are not the named recipient(s) , you may not retain copy or use this e-mail or any attachment for any purpose or disclose all or any part of the contents to any other person. Any such dissemination, distribution or copying of this e-mail or its attachments is strictly prohibited. Please immediately notify the sender and permanently delete this e-mail and any attachment from your computer.

                 

                 

                From: capri26@yahoogroups .com [mailto:capri26@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Gary Pack
                Sent: Wednesday, February 03, 2010 5:44 PM
                To: capri26@yahoogroups .com
                Subject: Re: [capri26] Head sails - again?

                 

                 

                Stephen, I would think a 150 would be fine.  I sail on an inland lake in Tennessee where wind varies all over the board.  I have a Cruising Direct main and 150 that are a few seasons old and use a furler.  I find the 150 is easy to use and desirable most of the time, even at wind approaching 20.  I’ll reef the main before I reef the 150.  Helps on the weather helm issue when the wind picks up.  The cut on the sails is very flat.  I presume that will be the case with most new sails since that apparently is the trend.  Therefore, a new sail will be much more efficient than a stretched out old sail and won’t be overpowered as easily.  It all depends on what your predominant wind speeds are.  I haven’t had any backwinding problems on the main.  

                On Richard’s  furler discussion, pointing is compromised when you use a furler.  With the CDI furler, there is no downhaul on the luff.  So when the wind picks up, unless you have a downhaul installed, you can’t flatten out the luff, which in turn results in the sail becoming overpowered sooner.  A furler with the rotating ring fitting at the top which connects to your jib halyard, allows you to control the tension on the sail.   I replaced my CDI and found the weight of the new furler to be considerably lighter than the CDI and the ability to control the luff tension really helped control the sail shape.     

                Unless you are a serious racer or perfectionist, I think the ease of use of a furler out weighs the extra few degrees of pointing.  I also discovered that if you barberhaul the sheet in a few inches, you can improve pointing with the 150.

                Gary Pack, Breezin’ Bye


                On 2/3/10 8:24 AM, "Stephen M. Hollingsworth" <stephen_m_h@ earthlink. com> wrote:


                 
                 
                   

                Ok Guys, I’m about to pull the trigger on a new North headsail (roller furler) and based on some responses from the group back in Sept, I was sold on a 150 but now I’m reading that a 135 might be the right size for our rigs.  All opinions are welcomed!!!! !
                 
                fyi, like any Midwest lake, average winds cover the entire range from 0 to 20.
                 
                 
                Stephen
                 

                From: capri26@yahoogroups .com [mailto:capri26@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of cavelamb
                Sent: Tuesday, February 02, 2010 9:56 PM
                To: capri26@yahoogroups .com
                Subject: Re: [capri26] Head sails - again?

                  

                Hi Uncle Bob!

                I have an asym spinnaker for down wind and reaching in light air..

                I've flown it solo.  It's a hand full getting it set, but then it settles down.
                While we are not actually really racing, it's WAY fun to pass the other boats!

                For reaching, and especially for beating, about 135 is as large as I'd go for a fore sail.
                Aerodynamics being what they are, at some point the trade off between jib shape and
                backwinded main are going to be less than optimal.

                I'm not so sure I could actually change head sails on the foil while under weigh.
                That's an interesting job even at the dock with someone helping.
                Under weigh - and solo???
                I think I'd need to be a lot better sailor first.

                But!
                 I hear you re: folding and putting them away.
                Thanks for bringing that up.  It's something to consider...

                I took the Genoa down Monday to do some stitching.
                (It really needs to be replaced, but it's going to have to wait another season)

                That thing really is a whole fore deck full of sail!


                So, yet another question...

                Does anybody here have a CDI furler with the ball bearings?
                Are they worth the bucks?


                Richard



                Bob Unkel wrote:


                  

                Richard,

                 

                 A lot depends on what type of sailing you do. If it is racing, then go for the hanked on headsails. If not my vote would be to keep the furler. Some things to consider if you switch back to hanked on sails. First you now have to find a place to store them, second it will take you more effort to get underway and to put it all away.  There is no doubt that you can get better sail shape with hanked on sails compared to ones on a furler.  Depending on the furler, you can  reduce sail with the various sails in your inventory. We still bend our sails on every time we go sailing, as I am now getting older it is more a pain in the butt to dig out the sails and get ready to get underway then have to go through proper folding them to put them away when we come back in.  Finally, I would think about limiting yourself to only a 135 genoa,  I think the bigger the better in light air.

                 

                Just one old geezers opinion,

                Bob Unkel

                 

                On Feb 2, 2010, at 6:27 PM, the saber Tooth Cave lamb wrote:



                  

                I'm just about to bite the bullet and pull the CDI roller
                off of my boat and go back to hank on sails.

                Discussing that idea with a neighbor on my pier (he has a V&C 27)
                we just about came to an agreement for a trade.

                His 3 hank on head sails (storm jib, working blade, and 135 Genoa) for
                my furler and Genoa.

                But I'm wondering if I should do that to a friend?
                Total stranger, maybe.
                But a friend and neighbor?

                Richard

                 



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