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Re: [capri26] What Spinnaker?

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  • Bob Unkel
    I have had both a cruising and a tri-radial on our boat. I borrowed a cruising spinnaker before I bought my tri-radial. The choice should be based on what you
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 1, 2010
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      I have had both a cruising and a tri-radial on our boat. I borrowed a cruising spinnaker before I bought my tri-radial.  The choice should be based on what you intend to do with it.  The cruising spinnaker or asymmetrical is much easier to fly and doesn't require as many lines etc. Typically the asymmetrical has its tack  attached to the same place you hank on the genoa.  Newer design boats have a sprite that extends the tack point forward.  As for how far forward you can carry apparent wind, it will  depend on the cut of the conventional spinnaker.

      The telescoping pole you have is most likely a whisker pole that can be used with a genoa or a cruising chute.  It sounds like you boat is rigged for a symmetrical spinnaker (tri-radial or conventional).  The proper pole for a symmetrical chute is normally a fixed length that should be the same length as the "J" dimension.  On our boats that is 8'7".  The halyard that is half way up the mast is the "Topping Lift" used to support the spinnaker pole.  Most spinnaker poles have a bridle on them that along with the topping lift is used to support the pole and enable it to be jibed.

      Typically the  spinnakers we would fly are made from ripstop nylon and are 3/4 oz material.  While there other weight cloth can be used it is normally for lighter wind conditions.

      If you are not racing the cruising spinnaker is fine for getting additional speed down wind or on a broad reach. It is much less hassle than a conventional spinnaker.  If you are racing, then you probably want a tri-radial spinnaker and will have crew available to fly it.  We have five lines to deal with when flying a conventional spinnaer.  Halyard, Topping Lift, Down Haul, Guy and the Sheet.  You can fly one with two people but you are busy!

      On our boat we have the tri-radial and an old Gennaker which came off of a Montego 26.  The Gennaker is like a really big genoa. It is rigged like a genoa only the block for the clew is much further aft than for a 150 or 170 genoa. It hanks on to the forestay and is a full hoist luff. It is made from 3/4  oz ripstop and the head of the sail is cut like a spinnaker.  We use a telescoping pole to wing it out when running directly down wind.  The tri-radial gets flown when racing or we have a bunch of beered up crew and are looking for kicks and giggles.  In increasing wind it is a beast to control, but sure gets power to the boat.

      If you look around you can generally find used sails that are in really good condition  or there are many sources for new ones. Again it all depends on what you want to do with the sail.
      Hope this helps, any questions let me know.
      Bob Unkel


      On Jul 31, 2010, at 11:25 AM, pppiv wrote:

       

      Hello all, I have a question or two about spinnakers. First let me say I know little about them. Our training classes didn't get to spinnakers. My '92 Capri 26 seems to be rigged for one. It came with a telescoping pole (not sure if its a spinnaker pole or whisker pole or even what the difference is) nicely mounted to the lifeline stanchions, a forward facing halyard and what I think is a topping lift for the pole (halyard with forward facing pulley half way up and an adjustable height ring on the forward side of the mast. My wife and I would like to try downwind sailing with a cruising spinnaker, so here are the questions... What should I buy...symmetrical or asymmetrical, what size for our Capri 26, radial or tri-raidal, what cloth weight, how much should I spend, new or used, where to look? I thought someone here may be able to make recommendations and point us in the right direction. I've been trying to educate myself from the internet, yet these questions remain.

      Thanks,
      Paul & Pam
      Orion


    • Paul
      Bob, Thanks for the advice. This is helpful. We would want a spinnaker for cruising (not racing) and ease of use. One thing I notice that is missing is
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 1, 2010
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        Bob,

        Thanks for the advice.  This is helpful.  We would want a spinnaker for cruising (not racing) and ease of use.  One thing I notice that is missing is bridle for the whisker pole and afterguy rigging.

        Paul & Pam
        "Orion", Hull#209


        On Aug 1, 2010, at 5:28 AM, Bob Unkel wrote:

         

        I have had both a cruising and a tri-radial on our boat. I borrowed a cruising spinnaker before I bought my tri-radial.  The choice should be based on what you intend to do with it.  The cruising spinnaker or asymmetrical is much easier to fly and doesn't require as many lines etc. Typically the asymmetrical has its tack  attached to the same place you hank on the genoa.  Newer design boats have a sprite that extends the tack point forward.  As for how far forward you can carry apparent wind, it will  depend on the cut of the conventional spinnaker.


        The telescoping pole you have is most likely a whisker pole that can be used with a genoa or a cruising chute.  It sounds like you boat is rigged for a symmetrical spinnaker (tri-radial or conventional) .  The proper pole for a symmetrical chute is normally a fixed length that should be the same length as the "J" dimension.  On our boats that is 8'7".  The halyard that is half way up the mast is the "Topping Lift" used to support the spinnaker pole.  Most spinnaker poles have a bridle on them that along with the topping lift is used to support the pole and enable it to be jibed.

        Typically the  spinnakers we would fly are made from ripstop nylon and are 3/4 oz material.  While there other weight cloth can be used it is normally for lighter wind conditions.

        If you are not racing the cruising spinnaker is fine for getting additional speed down wind or on a broad reach. It is much less hassle than a conventional spinnaker.  If you are racing, then you probably want a tri-radial spinnaker and will have crew available to fly it.  We have five lines to deal with when flying a conventional spinnaer.  Halyard, Topping Lift, Down Haul, Guy and the Sheet.  You can fly one with two people but you are busy!

        On our boat we have the tri-radial and an old Gennaker which came off of a Montego 26.  The Gennaker is like a really big genoa. It is rigged like a genoa only the block for the clew is much further aft than for a 150 or 170 genoa. It hanks on to the forestay and is a full hoist luff. It is made from 3/4  oz ripstop and the head of the sail is cut like a spinnaker.  We use a telescoping pole to wing it out when running directly down wind.  The tri-radial gets flown when racing or we have a bunch of beered up crew and are looking for kicks and giggles.  In increasing wind it is a beast to control, but sure gets power to the boat.

        If you look around you can generally find used sails that are in really good condition  or there are many sources for new ones. Again it all depends on what you want to do with the sail.
        Hope this helps, any questions let me know.
        Bob Unkel


        On Jul 31, 2010, at 11:25 AM, pppiv wrote:

         

        Hello all, I have a question or two about spinnakers. First let me say I know little about them. Our training classes didn't get to spinnakers. My '92 Capri 26 seems to be rigged for one. It came with a telescoping pole (not sure if its a spinnaker pole or whisker pole or even what the difference is) nicely mounted to the lifeline stanchions, a forward facing halyard and what I think is a topping lift for the pole (halyard with forward facing pulley half way up and an adjustable height ring on the forward side of the mast. My wife and I would like to try downwind sailing with a cruising spinnaker, so here are the questions... What should I buy...symmetrical or asymmetrical, what size for our Capri 26, radial or tri-raidal, what cloth weight, how much should I spend, new or used, where to look? I thought someone here may be able to make recommendations and point us in the right direction. I've been trying to educate myself from the internet, yet these questions remain.

        Thanks,
        Paul & Pam
        Orion




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