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The WiFi Opportunity for Developing Nations

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  • Richard Leary
    http://www.unicttaskforce.org/ On June 26, 2003, the Wireless Internet Institute (W2i), will join forces with the United Nations Information and Communication
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 3, 2003
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      On June 26, 2003, the Wireless Internet Institute (W2i), will join forces with the United Nations Information and Communication Technologies Task Force and hold a conference at the UN headquarters, "The WiFi Opportunity for Developing Nations", creating the conditions for informal dialogue and brainstorming among industry practitioners, government representatives and international development experts. The conference, featuring plenary sessions and structured brainstorming workshops, will seek to contribute to establish strategies necessary to overcome existing obstacles and develop environments favourable to the broad deployment of WiFi infrastructures. Its conclusions will serve as a blue print for future national consensus building programs, spectrum policies reform and new infrastructure deployment.
       
      THE WIRELESS INTERNET OPPORTUNITY FOR DEVELOPING NATIONS: CONFERENCE MANIFESTO
       
       
      The prospects of Wireless Internet are by all admissions very promising, offering vast development opportunities worldwide both from a mobility and fixed infrastructure standpoint. Wireless Internet technologies present very attractive opportunities for developing countries to leapfrog several generations of telecommunications infrastructure. Their deployment can become a critical factor in shrinking the digital divide by providing broadband Internet access to whole new segments of underserved populations throughout the world at a fraction of the cost of wired technologies.
       
      The UN Secretary General has recognized that opportunity and expressed a bold vision in his November 5th, 2002 declaration:
       
      "We need to think of ways to bring wireless fidelity (Wireless Internet) applications to the developing world, so as to make use of unlicensed radio spectrum to deliver cheap and fast Internet access."
       
      Indeed, technological developments are making rapid progress, and pilots around the world are fast proving that Wireless Internet technologies can bring broadband access to underserved populations at a fraction of the cost of current alternative infrastructures. However, rigid spectrum policies, protective regulatory environments and lack of sustainable business models remain critical obstacles to faster and broader deployment.
       
      These hurdles are the result of a number of issues primarily revolving around engrained spectrum licensing policies combined with conflicting interests from various constituencies, such as local military, security and finance authorities as well as long established incumbent communications monopolies. The emergence of Wireless Internet along with breakthroughs in managing radio spectrum are prompting debates around the world over the de-licensing of spectrum for public use, but little progress is being made. Hence, building consensus among the main stakeholders—users, technology/service providers, policymakers/regulators, investors—is critical to any successful broadscale Wireless Internet implementation.
       
      At stake, leveraging Wireless Internet’s low cost, is the potential to establish substantial economic and social development opportunities in the poorest and most challenged areas of the world. Meanwhile, services and technology deployment and integration opportunities will be substantial. They represent an attractive financial opportunity for investors and the private sector at large, provided sustainable business models are implemented. Successful case studies and sharing of best practices are therefore essential to any productive consensus building.
       
      W2i—the Wireless Internet Institute—a division of World Times, Inc., with its proven experience in bringing wireless Internet stakeholders together to foster universal connectivity to support economic, social and educational development, and the UNICT Task Force, are very well positioned to facilitate the required consensus building with a worldwide impact.
       
      On June 26 , 2003, W2i will join forces with the United Nations Information and Communication Technologies Task Force to hold a conference at UN Headquarters—The Wireless Internet Opportunity for Developing Nations—to create the conditions for informal dialogue and brainstorming among industry practitioners, government representatives and international development experts. The conference will feature plenary sessions, structured brainstorming workshops, and a showcase of innovative field applications, and will seek to contribute to establishing strategies necessary to overcome those obstacles and develop environments favorable to the broad deployment of Wireless Internet infrastructures. The conclusions from the conference will serve as a blueprint for future national consensus building programs, spectrum policies reform and new infrastructure deployment.
       
       
    • Richard Leary
      http://www.unicttaskforce.org/ On June 26, 2003, the Wireless Internet Institute (W2i), will join forces with the United Nations Information and Communication
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 3, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
         

         
        On June 26, 2003, the Wireless Internet Institute (W2i), will join forces with the United Nations Information and Communication Technologies Task Force and hold a conference at the UN headquarters, "The WiFi Opportunity for Developing Nations", creating the conditions for informal dialogue and brainstorming among industry practitioners, government representatives and international development experts. The conference, featuring plenary sessions and structured brainstorming workshops, will seek to contribute to establish strategies necessary to overcome existing obstacles and develop environments favourable to the broad deployment of WiFi infrastructures. Its conclusions will serve as a blue print for future national consensus building programs, spectrum policies reform and new infrastructure deployment.
         
        THE WIRELESS INTERNET OPPORTUNITY FOR DEVELOPING NATIONS: CONFERENCE MANIFESTO
         
         
        The prospects of Wireless Internet are by all admissions very promising, offering vast development opportunities worldwide both from a mobility and fixed infrastructure standpoint. Wireless Internet technologies present very attractive opportunities for developing countries to leapfrog several generations of telecommunications infrastructure. Their deployment can become a critical factor in shrinking the digital divide by providing broadband Internet access to whole new segments of underserved populations throughout the world at a fraction of the cost of wired technologies.
         
        The UN Secretary General has recognized that opportunity and expressed a bold vision in his November 5th, 2002 declaration:
         
        "We need to think of ways to bring wireless fidelity (Wireless Internet) applications to the developing world, so as to make use of unlicensed radio spectrum to deliver cheap and fast Internet access."
         
        Indeed, technological developments are making rapid progress, and pilots around the world are fast proving that Wireless Internet technologies can bring broadband access to underserved populations at a fraction of the cost of current alternative infrastructures. However, rigid spectrum policies, protective regulatory environments and lack of sustainable business models remain critical obstacles to faster and broader deployment.
         
        These hurdles are the result of a number of issues primarily revolving around engrained spectrum licensing policies combined with conflicting interests from various constituencies, such as local military, security and finance authorities as well as long established incumbent communications monopolies. The emergence of Wireless Internet along with breakthroughs in managing radio spectrum are prompting debates around the world over the de-licensing of spectrum for public use, but little progress is being made. Hence, building consensus among the main stakeholders—users, technology/service providers, policymakers/regulators, investors—is critical to any successful broadscale Wireless Internet implementation.
         
        At stake, leveraging Wireless Internet’s low cost, is the potential to establish substantial economic and social development opportunities in the poorest and most challenged areas of the world. Meanwhile, services and technology deployment and integration opportunities will be substantial. They represent an attractive financial opportunity for investors and the private sector at large, provided sustainable business models are implemented. Successful case studies and sharing of best practices are therefore essential to any productive consensus building.
         
        W2i—the Wireless Internet Institute—a division of World Times, Inc., with its proven experience in bringing wireless Internet stakeholders together to foster universal connectivity to support economic, social and educational development, and the UNICT Task Force, are very well positioned to facilitate the required consensus building with a worldwide impact.
         
        On June 26 , 2003, W2i will join forces with the United Nations Information and Communication Technologies Task Force to hold a conference at UN Headquarters—The Wireless Internet Opportunity for Developing Nations—to create the conditions for informal dialogue and brainstorming among industry practitioners, government representatives and international development experts. The conference will feature plenary sessions, structured brainstorming workshops, and a showcase of innovative field applications, and will seek to contribute to establishing strategies necessary to overcome those obstacles and develop environments favorable to the broad deployment of Wireless Internet infrastructures. The conclusions from the conference will serve as a blueprint for future national consensus building programs, spectrum policies reform and new infrastructure deployment.
         
         
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