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ENVISAT Imagery

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  • novasintra
    Go to http://envisat.esa.int/ and click on link to see a spectacular image of West
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 1, 2002
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      Go to http://envisat.esa.int/ and click on <The first ENVISAT check-
      up of the Earth - http://www.esa.int/envisat/> link to see a
      spectacular image of West Africa (Mauritania)with the easternmost
      section of the Cape Verde Islands just making it into the leftmost
      side of the image. Also Senegal, The Gambia, and northern Gunea
      Bissau.

      "The first MERIS observation has captured the huge phytoplankton
      patch produced by the "upwelling" mechanism along the Mauritanian
      coast. The unprecedented resolution allows fine scale structures to
      be detected. In such upwelling areas north-east trade winds bring
      deep and nutrient-rich water to the surface, feeding phytoplankton.
      Changes in climate affect the intensity of the upwelling with
      important consequences for marine ecosystems, fisheries and the local
      economy."

      Compare image to map of the area -
      http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/geos/pu.html

      Richard Leary

      ----------------------------------------------


      From CNN -
      http://www.cnn.com/2002/TECH/space/04/01/green.satellite/index.html


      The largest, most expensive satellite from the European Space Agency
      has beamed back its first images, signaling the start of a thorough
      examination of the health of the planet.

      The $2.2 billion, nine-ton spacecraft, launched one month ago aboard
      a powerful Ariane 5 rocket, is equipped with 10 different devices to
      monitor the atmosphere, land, sea and ice.

      Known as ENVISAT, the orbiter will provide the most detailed picture
      yet of environmental conditions on Earth, according to space agency
      scientists, who unveiled the inaugural images last week in Italy.

      The probe went into service just in time to capture the
      disintegration of an ice shelf in Antarctica. The rapid rate at which
      the Larsen B shelf broke apart surprised scientists, who speculate
      that it was hastened by global warming.
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