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quantum entropy and the decay

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  • Roger Lee Bagula
    How does entropy really work? And does entropy fuel evolution? Both energy and momentum in which the usual uncertainty laws are stated are conservative
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 1, 2002
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      How does entropy really work?
      And does entropy fuel evolution?

      Both energy and momentum in which the usual uncertainty laws are
      stated are "conservative" variables.
      Entropy in contrast only goes the one way
      (just like time).
      But is is possible to think of entropy in an uncertainty way
      if I invent a new variable "decay" based on temperature and time:
      DS*DD>hbar
      Since
      DS>=0
      from the second law of thermodynamics, this says that
      the "decay" variable, will always get smaller as the
      entropy increases.
      An operator differential equation:
      S*Phi=i*hbar*dPhi/dD
      Phi=Phi(0)*exp(-i*s(n)*D/hbar)
      S*Phi=s(n)*Phi
      But since entropy is thought of as information these days
      and in quantum black hole terms to
      is actually tied to the surface area of the singularity
      this can't be an easy kind of operator equation.
      And in terms of a second order uncertainty:
      DS*DD>hbar+c1+c2*DD
      Since this is a linear term that is small and always getting smaller,
      it doesn't affect anything until you start getting very large energies
      in quantum terms.
      or looking at it the other way:
      DS*DD>hbar+c3+c4*DS

      As the universe gets older it "decays" and in the process of that decay
      it creates "memory" that is seen as entropy / information.
      The time starts small ( maybe zero?) and the temperature very high and decreases.
      The entropy also must start small and get larger. So with both time and entropy
      getting larger all the time, but not at exactly the same rate, the
      change in
      temperature has to reflect the difference between the two. Put together
      temperature and time as one decay variable to balance the entropy.
      In classical thermodynamics it is phase transitions ( solid to liquid)
      that make
      the temperature curve discontinuous. In cosmology it
      is "false vacuum" and inflation.

      For me this is a very hard thought problem. Since decay processes do
      only go one way
      and we have models like capacitor discharge and radio active decay to model
      ideas on,
      it does seem logical that a decay variable could exist.

      Do hot capacitors decay faster than cold ones?
      I think they might, but I had never thought to ask the question
      before?
      Respectfully, Roger L. Bagula
      tftn@..., 11759Waterhill Road, Lakeside,Ca 92040-2905,tel:
      619-5610814 :
      TFTN web sites maintained as an Emag:
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    • Roger Lee Bagula
      to jimscarver The universe started as one particle so it could have low entropy and high temperature. The universe is considered a closed system
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 1, 2002
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        to "jimscarver" <jim@x...>
        The universe started as one particle so it could have low entropy and
        high temperature.
        The universe is considered a closed system in most physics of cosmology.
        Entropy can only decrease locally and when it does it is always by
        somewhere else increasing more so that
        the "expectation" of entropy always increases.
        but you missed the main import: it seems to have gone over your head
        or not dawned on you!
        The new fundamental variable i call
        "decay".
        It is yin to entropy's yang.
        It's "expectation" is always lower.
        Neither time nor temperature alone tell us how a universe really changes
        and can have
        "false vacuum", but the decay allows that.
        Most of what we call measures of "time" are actually measures of
        temperatures at a given time.
        For instance radio active decay in "decay" variable terms would speed up
        or slow down
        as the temperature changed. The expansion of the universe is for it's
        speed very much dependent on
        the background "vacuum": a "false vacuum" changes it's rate
        dramatically.

        I'm not the sharpest stick in the pile, but this is a nice idea and
        it seems to work. It explains a lot in very simple terms.

        In terms of capacitors:
        C=k*A/d: A= area of plates : d=distance of plates apart
        is the law used by electronics people.
        It is the k terms that of permeability that is
        temperature sensitive. And since Intel keeps raising clock rates,
        all our computers with their capacitor like MOS circuits have changing rates.
        Your computers are running hotter today that they did before!
        So it is a good question and not obvious in it's result.
        Over clocking a Mac by several hundred megacycles
        raises it temperature 1 or 2 degrees C. As a result you either have to
        cool it better
        or it begins to over heat.
        Over heating was the main fault that Amigas had.: an extra fan was the
        solution.
        Respectfully, Roger L. Bagula
        tftn@..., 11759Waterhill Road, Lakeside,Ca 92040-2905,tel:
        619-5610814 :
        TFTN web sites maintained as an Emag:
        URL : http://home.earthlink.net/~tftn
        URL : http://www.geocities.com/ResearchTriangle/Thinktank/7279/
        URL : http://members.nbci.com/RogerLBagula/index.html
        URL : http://sites.netscape.net/rlbtftn/index.html
        URL : http://victorian.fortunecity.com/carmelita/435/
        URL : http://www.crosswinds.net/~translight/index.html
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