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  • maw@duke.edu
    Hello all, My name is Matthew Wolinsky, and I m a 2nd year grad student in geology at Duke University, U.S. I have good practical knowledge of nonlinear
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 30 4:45 PM
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      Hello all,

      My name is Matthew Wolinsky, and I'm a 2nd year grad student
      in geology at Duke University, U.S. I have good practical knowledge
      of nonlinear dynamics and chaos, but am not much for lemmas or proofs
      really. I study pattern formation in earth surface systems such as
      river basin evolution, sand dune-fields, etc. Most work in my field
      is computational/experimental/fieldwork rather than detailed theory,
      due to the complexity and large space/time scales of the systems of
      interest (geomorphic systems).

      IMO studying complex natural systems in the framework of
      nonlinear dynamics/chaos requires some philosophical caution. For
      instance many researchers like to plot log-log and calculate scaling
      exponents, but without any deeper scientific insight. For instance,
      using digital elevation models, a fractal dimension or corellation
      functions for topography can be calculated. However, fBm (fractional
      brownian motion) can generate an infinite variety of topographic
      surfaces which are un-natural looking, but have the same
      scaling/correlation properties. These properties determine a Hurst
      exponent (H), which determines a power spectrum, but the phase
      spectrum is unconstrained by these aggregated metrics!

      The issue of "universality" can be good in some cases, but if
      many systems fall into the same universality class consistently (such
      as all topography with H=0.4!), then the metric isn't very useful
      scientifically. A metric should be able to distinguish different
      processes or models which may have resulted in the current data. If
      the metric is the same regardless of many different processes which
      produce visibly different data, then a new metric is needed.
      This was seen in the realization that classical (grasssberger
      procaccia-style) nonlinear time-series analysis is impractical for
      noisy, short times series of natural systems.

      As for my research I am starting a project this summer on
      submarine landslide dynamics. A summary of my research is at

      http://www.duke.edu/~maw/csgf_essay.html

      If anyone has questions about my work or nonlinear dynamics in geology
      I'll be happy to extrapolate.

      I have many interests in nonlinear dynamics and "complex systems" and
      hope to learn from this list.

      Best Regards,

      Matthew Wolinsky
      http://www.duke.edu/~maw/index.htm
      maw@...
    • marisamanus
      I am new just wanted to say Hi from California Marisa www.dreamweaverinternational.com
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 13, 2004
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        I am new just wanted to say Hi from California

        Marisa
        www.dreamweaverinternational.com
      • Nair Prajit
        Hi Friends I am new to this group. Let me introduce myself Name : S.Prajit Nair Age : 28 Sex : Male Nationality : India Present Location : S.Korea
        Message 3 of 3 , May 2, 2006
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          Hi Friends
          I am new to this group. Let me introduce myself

          Name : S.Prajit Nair
          Age : 28
          Sex : Male
          Nationality : India
          Present Location : S.Korea
          Qualification  M.Tech (DSP)
          Occupation : Asst. Manager  , Samsung Techwin, S.Korea



          I am interested in Chaotic Theory and would like to share my views and learn from the experiences of other members.
          Thanks
          With Best Regards
          Prajit
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