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Re: [caodai] Reciprocity Principle

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  • Ngasha@juno.com
    Please note that I am not the author of this, the author is listed at the bottom as BA Robinson. On Thu, 21 Sep 2000 09:44:10 -0400 Ngasha Beck
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 1, 2000
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      Please note that I am not the author of this, the author is listed at the
      bottom as BA Robinson.

      On Thu, 21 Sep 2000 09:44:10 -0400 Ngasha Beck <Ngasha@...>
      writes:
      > -------------------------- eGroups Sponsor
      >
      > Quotation:
      > "Every religion emphasizes human improvement, love, respect for
      > others,
      > sharing other people's suffering. On these lines every religion had
      > more or
      > less the same viewpoint and the same goal." The Dalai Lama
      >
      >
      >
      > Overview
      > Religious groups differ greatly in their concepts of deity, other
      > beliefs and
      > practices. Non-theistic ethical and philosophic systems, like
      > Humanism, also
      > exhibit a wide range of beliefs. But there is near unanimity of
      > opinion that
      > each person should treat others as they would themselves wish to be
      > treated.
      > Almost all religious and ethical groups have passages in their holy
      > texts, or
      > writings of their leaders, which promote this Ethic of Reciprocity.
      > The most
      > commonly known version in North America is the Golden Rule of
      > Christianity.
      >
      > One result of this Ethic is the concept that every person shares
      > certain
      > inherent human rights, simply because of their membership in the
      > human race.
      > People are individually very different; they come in two main
      > genders, all
      > sizes and shapes, many races, and three sexual orientations. They
      > follow many
      > religious and economic systems. But there is a growing consensus
      > that all are
      > equal in importance. All should enjoy basic human rights. The
      > United Nations
      > Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) is one manifestation of
      > this
      > growing worldwide consensus. 3,4
      >
      >
      >
      > Some "Ethic of Reciprocity" passages from the religious texts of
      > various
      > religions
      > Bah�'� World Faith: "Ascribe not to any soul that which thou
      > wouldst not
      > have ascribed to thee, and say not that which thou doest not."
      > "Blessed is he
      > who preferreth his brother before himself." Baha'u'llah
      > "And if thine eyes be turned towards justice, choose thou for thy
      > neighbour
      > that which thou choosest for thyself." Epistle to the Son of the
      > Wolf
      >
      > Brahmanism: "This is the sum of duty: Do naught unto others which
      > would cause
      > you pain if done to you". Mahabharata, 5:1517
      > Buddhism: "a state that is not pleasing or delightful to me, how
      > could I
      > inflict that upon another?" Samyutta NIkaya v. 353
      > Hurt not others in ways that you yourself would find hurtful."
      > Udana-Varga
      > 5:18
      >
      > Christianity: "Therefore all things whatsoever ye would that men
      > should do
      > to you, do ye even so to them." Matthew 7:12
      > "...and don't do what you hate...", Gospel of Thomas 6
      >
      > Confucianism: "Do not do to others what you do not want them to do
      > to you"
      > Analects 15:23 "Tse-kung asked, 'Is there one word that can serve as
      > a
      > principle of conduct for life?' Confucius replied, 'It is the word
      > 'shu' --
      > reciprocity. Do not impose on others what you yourself do not
      > desire.'"
      > Doctrine of the Mean 13.3
      > Hinduism: "One should not behave towards others in a way which is
      >
      > disagreeable to oneself" Mencius Vii.A.4
      > "This is the sum of duty: do naught unto others which would cause
      > you pain if
      > done to you." Mahabharata 5:1517
      >
      > Islam: "Not one of you is a believer until he loves for his brother
      > what he
      > loves for himself" Fourth Hadith of an-Nawawi 13
      > Jainism: "Therefore, neither does he [, a sage,] cause violence
      > to others
      > nor does he make others do so." Acarangasutra 5.101-2.
      > "In happiness and suffering, in joy and grief, we should regard all
      > creatures
      > as we regard our own self." Lord Mahavira, 24th Tirthankara
      > "A man should wander about treating all creatures as he himself
      > would be
      > treated. "Sutrakritanga 1.11.33
      >
      > Judaism: "...thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself.", Leviticus
      > 19:18
      > "What is hateful to you, do not to your fellow man. This is the
      > law: all the
      > rest is commentary." Talmud, Shabbat 31a
      >
      > Native American Spirituality: "Respect for all life is the
      > foundation." The
      > Great Law of Peace
      > Roman Pagan Religion: "The law imprinted on the hearts of all men
      > is to love
      > the members of society as themselves."
      > Shinto: "The heart of the person before you is a mirror. See there
      > your own
      > form"
      > Sikhism: "Compassion-mercy and religion are the support of the
      > entire world".
      > Japji Sahib "Don't create enmity with anyone as God is within
      > everyone." Guru
      > Arjan Devji 259
      > Sufism: "The basis of Sufism is consideration of the hearts and
      > feelings of
      > others. If you haven't the will to gladden someone's heart, then at
      > least
      > beware lest you hurt someone's heart, for on our path, no sin exists
      > but
      > this." Dr. Javad Nurbakhsh, Master of the Nimatullahi Sufi Order.
      > Taoism: "Regard your neighbor's gain as your own gain, and your
      > neighbor's
      > loss as your own loss." T'ai Shang Kan Ying P'ien. "I am good to the
      > man who
      > is good to me, likewise, I am also good to the bad man." Tao Te
      > Ching
      > Wicca: "A'in it harm no one, do what thou wilt" (i.e. do what every
      > you want
      > to, as long as it harms nobody, including yourself). The Wiccan Rede
      > Yoruba: (Nigeria): "One going to take a pointed stick to pinch a
      > baby bird
      > should first try it on himself to feel how it hurts."
      > Zoroastrianism: "That nature alone is good which refrains from
      > doing unto
      > another whatsoever is not good for itself". Dadistan-i-dinik 94:5
      > "Whatever is disagreeable to yourself do not do unto others."
      > Shayast-na-Shayast 13:29
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Some philosophers' statements are
      > Socrates: "Do not do to others that which would anger you if others
      > did it to
      > you." (Greece; 5th century BCE)
      > Seneca: "Treat your inferiors as you would be treated by your
      > superiors,"
      > Epistle 47:11 (Rome; 1st century CE)
      >
      >
      >
      > One example from an ethical system is
      > Humanism: "...critical intelligence, infused by a sense of human
      > caring, is
      > the best method that humanity has for resolving problems. Reason
      > should be
      > balanced with compassion and empathy and the whole person
      > fulfilled." Humanist
      > Manifesto II; Ethics section.
      >
      >
      >
      > Two exceptions
      > Church of Satan: "4. Satan represents kindness to those who deserve
      > it
      > instead of love wasted on ingrates! 5. Satan represents vengeance
      > instead of
      > turning the other cheek.!" A.S. LaVey, founder of The Church of
      > Satan, The
      > Nine Satanic Statements.
      > World Church of the Creator: "What is good for the White Race is
      > the highest
      > virtue; what is bad for the White Race is the ultimate sin."
      > Although the
      > W.C.O.T.C. uses the term "church" they are strongly anti-Christian
      > in belief.
      > Their religion is based mainly upon love of the white race and
      > hatred of
      > everyone else, which they call members of the "mud races."
      >
      >
      >
      > Care is needed in applying the Golden Rule
      > Any rule must be applied carefully, and with full knowledge of the
      > likely
      > consequences. Many of the above "golden rules" imply that there is
      > some
      > absolute standard on what is beneficial and what is harmful.
      > Consider:
      > George Bernard Shaw, (1903): "Do not do unto others as you would
      > that they
      > should do unto you. Their tastes may not be the same."
      > A lot of harm has been done historically, in the name of helping
      > other people.
      > Some examples:
      >
      > Many individuals involved in the torture and murder of Witches
      > during the
      > late Middle Ages and Renaissance felt that their mission was to help
      > both
      > society and the Witches. The latter would be given a chance to
      > renounce their
      > beliefs and be executed before they recanted. This might give them
      > access to
      > Heaven rather than being sent to Hell for endless torture.
      > Some suicidologists believe that the extremely high suicide rate
      > among native
      > people in North America is a direct result of the destruction of
      > their
      > aboriginal faith and other aspects of their society by Christian
      > groups.
      > Social programs that were originally designed to help the poor, can
      > sometimes
      > backfire and entrap the very people they intended to help.
      >
      > Before applying the golden rule, we should take care that we are
      > really
      > helping people, and not harming them.
      >
      >
      >
      > Failures of the Ethic of Reciprocity
      > Many individuals are primarily concerned with their own well being,
      > and that
      > of their family and "tribe." Some are able to apply the ethic of
      > reciprocity
      > only to their immediate friends and relatives. Somehow, people who
      > are close
      > to us are seen as more "equal" than strangers.
      >
      > Some individuals are able to extend the Ethic to all fellow
      > believers who
      > share their religion. An insufficient number are able to extend it
      > to
      > followers of other religions and ultimately to all human beings. The
      > large
      > number of religiously-based civil disturbances and wars currently
      > active in
      > the world is evidence of this failing.
      >
      >
      >
      > Passages that violate the Ethic of Reciprocity
      > Unfortunately, many religious texts contain other passages that
      > contradict the
      > Ethic of Reciprocity. The Christian Bible is one example. It
      > contains sections
      > which promote both religious tolerance and religious intolerance. In
      > places,
      > it advocates genocide against other tribes, extermination of people
      > of other
      > religions, and murder of individuals with minority sexual
      > orientations. It
      > condones slavery and, in places, promotes an inferior status for
      > women.
      >
      >
      >
      > References:
      > A.S. LaVey, "The Nine Satanic Statements," in The Satanic Bible,
      > Avon Books
      > (1969), Page 25.
      >
      > Rev. Matt Hale, "The World to Come," The Struggle, Issue XXVIII.
      > Online at:
      > http://www.creator.org
      >
      > The English text of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights is at:
      >
      > http://www.un.org/Overview/rights.html
      > The text is available in other languages is at:
      > http://www.unhchr.ch/html/menu6/1/univdec1.htm
      > Copyright �1995 to 2000 incl. by Ontario Consultants on Religious
      > Tolerance
      > Latest update: 2000-JUL-14
      > Author: B.A. Robinson
      >
      >
      > Go to the previous page or return to the Religious Information
      > menu, or
      > choose:
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > WE ARE ALL ONE.
      >

      Wife to Savoeun--21 years! Mom to somebody as yet unknown; student (of
      life & college), Theravada Buddhist, CaoDai (religious peace & unity)
      volunteer, Khmer cultural supporter, at-home computer slave, doglover,
      maid, chef and chief bottlewasher at the residence variously referred to
      as: P.O.Box 694, Keithville, Louisiana 71047-0694, SOLDR1111@..., &
      Ngasha@...

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    • hedgehog@scripps.edu
      ... ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ I am afraid BA Robinson lets some of his (or her?) biases creep out at this point. ... This is from what is commonly called the Old
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 2, 2000
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        >> Passages that violate the Ethic of Reciprocity
        >> Unfortunately, many religious texts contain other passages that
        >> contradict the
        >> Ethic of Reciprocity. The Christian Bible is one example.
        ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

        I am afraid BA Robinson lets some of his (or her?) biases creep out at this
        point.

        >> It
        >> contains sections
        >> which promote both religious tolerance and religious intolerance. In
        >> places,
        >> it advocates genocide against other tribes,

        This is from what is commonly called the "Old Testament".

        >> extermination of people
        >> of other
        >> religions,

        As is this.

        >> and murder of individuals with minority sexual
        >> orientations.

        As is this.

        >> It
        >> condones slavery and, in places, promotes an inferior status for
        >> women.

        The New Testament does show a relative tolerance for slavery and some
        tolerance for traditional sexism, but then so does the Old Testament.

        So why single out Christianity when all these flaws would also be present
        in the Jewish Bible?

        I am suspicious of people claiming to be tolerant who also seem to have an
        axe to grind with respect to Christianity. All religions have their good
        ideals and their evil shortcomings.
      • Ryan A. MacMichael
        Hi -- ... This does seem to often be the case. The thing to remember is that most religions themselves aren t bad or negative, but often the people who
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 3, 2000
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          Hi --

          > I am suspicious of people claiming to be tolerant who also seem to have an
          > axe to grind with respect to Christianity. All religions have their good
          > ideals and their evil shortcomings.

          This does seem to often be the case. The thing to remember is that
          most religions themselves aren't bad or negative, but often the people
          who practice them are.


          peace... Ryan
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