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Iso 50

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  • bgebz
    can anyone make a hack to get an iso of 50 in a digital rebel XTi? that d be nice...
    Message 1 of 12 , Jun 1, 2007
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      can anyone make a hack to get an iso of 50 in a digital rebel XTi?
      that'd be nice...
    • Steve Yeager
      I don t think so. There are no hacks at all for XT that I know of. But I am curious why would you want it? _____ From: canondigicamhacking@yahoogroups.com
      Message 2 of 12 , Jun 2, 2007
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        I don't think so. There are no hacks at all for XT that I know of. But I
        am curious why would you want it?



        _____

        From: canondigicamhacking@yahoogroups.com
        [mailto:canondigicamhacking@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of bgebz
        Sent: Friday, June 01, 2007 23:47
        To: canondigicamhacking@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [canondigicamhacking] Iso 50



        can anyone make a hack to get an iso of 50 in a digital rebel XTi?
        that'd be nice...



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • bgebz
        because i need to take really long exposure shots (Lightning and such) and i need it as dark as possible, without much grain . but oh well, i guess it won t
        Message 3 of 12 , Jun 2, 2007
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          because i need to take really long exposure shots (Lightning and such) and i need it as dark
          as possible, without much grain . but oh well, i guess it won't happen. haha thanks though
        • Jan
          The sensor s sensitivity is optimal at a particular ISO. The manufacture will then vary that sensitivity with the design of the electronics and then firmware
          Message 4 of 12 , Jun 2, 2007
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            The sensor's sensitivity is optimal at a particular ISO. The manufacture will then vary that sensitivity with the design of the electronics and then firmware which varies the configuration/usability of the hardware. The optimal operation of the sensor on the 300D is at 200 ISO. Firmware induced deviations either up or down will increase positive or negative stress on the sensor (to put it that way) and introduce things like noise, and I would say colour imbalance issues. If the harware was not designed to deliver ISO 50 then firmware will not deliver it. A type of ISO 50 can be obtained by doing ISO 100 and underexposing by 1 f stop (setting Ev -1) and shooting RAW and picing up the detail in PP.

            That's as I understand it. If I am wrong I would invite corrections.
            I installed the hack on my 300D, I applaud the enginuity, I enjoy the freedoms that it has given my photographic artistry, so my thanks to the hackers.


            Jan


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Jin Kim
            So is iso1600, -1EV really the same as a camera that has iso 3200? I dunno about that... There s way too much noise when doing the -1EV trick comparing with
            Message 5 of 12 , Jun 3, 2007
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              So is iso1600, -1EV really the same as a camera that has iso 3200?

              I dunno about that... There's way too much noise when doing the -1EV trick comparing with say a nikon d40 that has an iso 3200 setting...



              ----- Original Message -----
              From: canondigicamhacking@yahoogroups.com <canondigicamhacking@yahoogroups.com>
              To: canondigicamhacking@yahoogroups.com <canondigicamhacking@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Sun Jun 03 00:34:35 2007
              Subject: Re: [canondigicamhacking] Re: Iso 50

              The sensor's sensitivity is optimal at a particular ISO. The manufacture will then vary that sensitivity with the design of the electronics and then firmware which varies the configuration/usability of the hardware. The optimal operation of the sensor on the 300D is at 200 ISO. Firmware induced deviations either up or down will increase positive or negative stress on the sensor (to put it that way) and introduce things like noise, and I would say colour imbalance issues. If the harware was not designed to deliver ISO 50 then firmware will not deliver it. A type of ISO 50 can be obtained by doing ISO 100 and underexposing by 1 f stop (setting Ev -1) and shooting RAW and picing up the detail in PP.

              That's as I understand it. If I am wrong I would invite corrections.
              I installed the hack on my 300D, I applaud the enginuity, I enjoy the freedoms that it has given my photographic artistry, so my thanks to the hackers.


              Jan


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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            • Bill Keiser
              as far as i know, there is no firmware code available for the XT or the XTi. if you use the RAW image files, ISO is irrelevant. to increase the exposure time
              Message 6 of 12 , Jun 3, 2007
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                as far as i know, there is no firmware code available for the XT or
                the XTi.
                if you use the RAW image files, ISO is irrelevant.
                to increase the exposure time more, get some ND filters.
                bill keiser


                "bgebz" <bgebz@...> wrote:
                >
                > can anyone make a hack to get an iso of 50 in a digital rebel XTi?
                > that'd be nice...
                >
              • Steve Yeager
                In fact there is more to it. Looks like sensors have fixed sensitivity, and it can t be changed at all. What they call ISO settings is not the sensor gain
                Message 7 of 12 , Jun 4, 2007
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                  In fact there is more to it. Looks like sensors have fixed sensitivity, and
                  it can't be changed at all. What they call ISO settings is not the sensor
                  gain adjustment. They take the advantage of wide dynamic range and
                  manipulate output signal (shift/amplify) to make it look like it corresponds
                  to some familiar ISO setting. Certainly, when they do it, you can get some
                  clipping, noise, distorted curves, etc.



                  And I didn't know ISO 200 is optimal for 300D. I thought it was 100.
                  Thanks.



                  _____

                  From: canondigicamhacking@yahoogroups.com
                  [mailto:canondigicamhacking@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jan
                  Sent: Sunday, June 03, 2007 00:35
                  To: canondigicamhacking@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [canondigicamhacking] Re: Iso 50



                  The sensor's sensitivity is optimal at a particular ISO. The manufacture
                  will then vary that sensitivity with the design of the electronics and then
                  firmware which varies the configuration/usability of the hardware. The
                  optimal operation of the sensor on the 300D is at 200 ISO. Firmware induced
                  deviations either up or down will increase positive or negative stress on
                  the sensor (to put it that way) and introduce things like noise, and I would
                  say colour imbalance issues. If the harware was not designed to deliver ISO
                  50 then firmware will not deliver it. A type of ISO 50 can be obtained by
                  doing ISO 100 and underexposing by 1 f stop (setting Ev -1) and shooting RAW
                  and picing up the detail in PP.

                  That's as I understand it. If I am wrong I would invite corrections.
                  I installed the hack on my 300D, I applaud the enginuity, I enjoy the
                  freedoms that it has given my photographic artistry, so my thanks to the
                  hackers.

                  Jan



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • soldeersmurfje
                  You are right, a sensor has a native sensitivity, which is the lowest ISO possible. This basically is the unamplified signal coming from the sensor. Anything
                  Message 8 of 12 , Jun 13, 2007
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                    You are right, a sensor has a native sensitivity, which is the lowest
                    ISO possible. This basically is the unamplified signal coming from the
                    sensor. Anything above that is obtained by amplification (hence
                    increased noise with more ISO).
                    If ISO 100 is too sensitive, add a neutral grey filter.

                    Alternative is to take multiple exposure of shorter time and stack
                    them. That will diminish noise as well.

                    Lex

                    --- In canondigicamhacking@yahoogroups.com, Steve Yeager
                    <syeager9@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > In fact there is more to it. Looks like sensors have fixed
                    sensitivity, and
                    > it can't be changed at all. What they call ISO settings is not the
                    sensor
                    > gain adjustment. They take the advantage of wide dynamic range and
                    > manipulate output signal (shift/amplify) to make it look like it
                    corresponds
                    > to some familiar ISO setting. Certainly, when they do it, you can
                    get some
                    > clipping, noise, distorted curves, etc.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > And I didn't know ISO 200 is optimal for 300D. I thought it was 100.
                    > Thanks.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > _____
                    >
                    > From: canondigicamhacking@yahoogroups.com
                    > [mailto:canondigicamhacking@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jan
                    > Sent: Sunday, June 03, 2007 00:35
                    > To: canondigicamhacking@yahoogroups.com
                    > Subject: Re: [canondigicamhacking] Re: Iso 50
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > The sensor's sensitivity is optimal at a particular ISO. The manufacture
                    > will then vary that sensitivity with the design of the electronics
                    and then
                    > firmware which varies the configuration/usability of the hardware. The
                    > optimal operation of the sensor on the 300D is at 200 ISO. Firmware
                    induced
                    > deviations either up or down will increase positive or negative
                    stress on
                    > the sensor (to put it that way) and introduce things like noise, and
                    I would
                    > say colour imbalance issues. If the harware was not designed to
                    deliver ISO
                    > 50 then firmware will not deliver it. A type of ISO 50 can be
                    obtained by
                    > doing ISO 100 and underexposing by 1 f stop (setting Ev -1) and
                    shooting RAW
                    > and picing up the detail in PP.
                    >
                    > That's as I understand it. If I am wrong I would invite corrections.
                    > I installed the hack on my 300D, I applaud the enginuity, I enjoy the
                    > freedoms that it has given my photographic artistry, so my thanks to the
                    > hackers.
                    >
                    > Jan
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                  • Tom Maugham
                    Interesting. Does anyone know the optimal ISO for a 20D? Thanks, Tom _____ From: canondigicamhacking@yahoogroups.com
                    Message 9 of 12 , Jun 13, 2007
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                      Interesting. Does anyone know the optimal ISO for a 20D?



                      Thanks,

                      Tom



                      _____

                      From: canondigicamhacking@yahoogroups.com
                      [mailto:canondigicamhacking@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of soldeersmurfje
                      Sent: Wednesday, June 13, 2007 3:51 PM
                      To: canondigicamhacking@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: [canondigicamhacking] Re: Iso 50



                      You are right, a sensor has a native sensitivity, which is the lowest
                      ISO possible. This basically is the unamplified signal coming from the
                      sensor. Anything above that is obtained by amplification (hence
                      increased noise with more ISO).
                      If ISO 100 is too sensitive, add a neutral grey filter.

                      Alternative is to take multiple exposure of shorter time and stack
                      them. That will diminish noise as well.

                      Lex

                      --- In canondigicamhacking <mailto:canondigicamhacking%40yahoogroups.com>
                      @yahoogroups.com, Steve Yeager
                      <syeager9@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > In fact there is more to it. Looks like sensors have fixed
                      sensitivity, and
                      > it can't be changed at all. What they call ISO settings is not the
                      sensor
                      > gain adjustment. They take the advantage of wide dynamic range and
                      > manipulate output signal (shift/amplify) to make it look like it
                      corresponds
                      > to some familiar ISO setting. Certainly, when they do it, you can
                      get some
                      > clipping, noise, distorted curves, etc.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > And I didn't know ISO 200 is optimal for 300D. I thought it was 100.
                      > Thanks.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > _____
                      >
                      > From: canondigicamhacking <mailto:canondigicamhacking%40yahoogroups.com>
                      @yahoogroups.com
                      > [mailto:canondigicamhacking <mailto:canondigicamhacking%40yahoogroups.com>
                      @yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jan
                      > Sent: Sunday, June 03, 2007 00:35
                      > To: canondigicamhacking <mailto:canondigicamhacking%40yahoogroups.com>
                      @yahoogroups.com
                      > Subject: Re: [canondigicamhacking] Re: Iso 50
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > The sensor's sensitivity is optimal at a particular ISO. The manufacture
                      > will then vary that sensitivity with the design of the electronics
                      and then
                      > firmware which varies the configuration/usability of the hardware. The
                      > optimal operation of the sensor on the 300D is at 200 ISO. Firmware
                      induced
                      > deviations either up or down will increase positive or negative
                      stress on
                      > the sensor (to put it that way) and introduce things like noise, and
                      I would
                      > say colour imbalance issues. If the harware was not designed to
                      deliver ISO
                      > 50 then firmware will not deliver it. A type of ISO 50 can be
                      obtained by
                      > doing ISO 100 and underexposing by 1 f stop (setting Ev -1) and
                      shooting RAW
                      > and picing up the detail in PP.
                      >
                      > That's as I understand it. If I am wrong I would invite corrections.
                      > I installed the hack on my 300D, I applaud the enginuity, I enjoy the
                      > freedoms that it has given my photographic artistry, so my thanks to the
                      > hackers.
                      >
                      > Jan
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >





                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • David Hoyt
                      I use a Canon 300D at ISO 100 and am able to get 20 x 30 in prints with great quality. remember the following: 1. Large prints are viewd at a distance and any
                      Message 10 of 12 , Jun 13, 2007
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                        I use a Canon 300D at ISO 100 and am able to get 20 x 30 in prints with great quality.
                        remember the following:
                        1. Large prints are viewd at a distance and any noise is reduced.
                        2. Photoshop has decent noise reduction filter but there are many plugins that also reduce noise considerably.
                        3. If noise is a real issue move to a larger sensor (i.e. more $ on equipment)
                        4. Add more noise in Photoshop and create an "art" print


                        soldeersmurfje <a.augusteijn1@...> wrote:
                        You are right, a sensor has a native sensitivity, which is the lowest
                        ISO possible. This basically is the unamplified signal coming from the
                        sensor. Anything above that is obtained by amplification (hence
                        increased noise with more ISO).
                        If ISO 100 is too sensitive, add a neutral grey filter.

                        Alternative is to take multiple exposure of shorter time and stack
                        them. That will diminish noise as well.

                        Lex

                        --- In canondigicamhacking@yahoogroups.com, Steve Yeager
                        wrote:
                        >
                        > In fact there is more to it. Looks like sensors have fixed
                        sensitivity, and
                        > it can't be changed at all. What they call ISO settings is not the
                        sensor
                        > gain adjustment. They take the advantage of wide dynamic range and
                        > manipulate output signal (shift/amplify) to make it look like it
                        corresponds
                        > to some familiar ISO setting. Certainly, when they do it, you can
                        get some
                        > clipping, noise, distorted curves, etc.
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > And I didn't know ISO 200 is optimal for 300D. I thought it was 100.
                        > Thanks.
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > _____
                        >
                        > From: canondigicamhacking@yahoogroups.com
                        > [mailto:canondigicamhacking@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jan
                        > Sent: Sunday, June 03, 2007 00:35
                        > To: canondigicamhacking@yahoogroups.com
                        > Subject: Re: [canondigicamhacking] Re: Iso 50
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > The sensor's sensitivity is optimal at a particular ISO. The manufacture
                        > will then vary that sensitivity with the design of the electronics
                        and then
                        > firmware which varies the configuration/usability of the hardware. The
                        > optimal operation of the sensor on the 300D is at 200 ISO. Firmware
                        induced
                        > deviations either up or down will increase positive or negative
                        stress on
                        > the sensor (to put it that way) and introduce things like noise, and
                        I would
                        > say colour imbalance issues. If the harware was not designed to
                        deliver ISO
                        > 50 then firmware will not deliver it. A type of ISO 50 can be
                        obtained by
                        > doing ISO 100 and underexposing by 1 f stop (setting Ev -1) and
                        shooting RAW
                        > and picing up the detail in PP.
                        >
                        > That's as I understand it. If I am wrong I would invite corrections.
                        > I installed the hack on my 300D, I applaud the enginuity, I enjoy the
                        > freedoms that it has given my photographic artistry, so my thanks to the
                        > hackers.
                        >
                        > Jan
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >





                        Yahoo! Groups Links






                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Chaz
                        Alternative is to take multiple exposure of shorter time and stack them. That will diminish noise as well. Lex Better still just take one photo and in
                        Message 11 of 12 , Jun 14, 2007
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                          Alternative is to take multiple exposure of shorter time and stack
                          them. That will diminish noise as well.
                          Lex
                          Better still just take one photo and in Photoshop make a secondary and in
                          blend mode multiply you will have double the info.

                          You can add more layer and if too much adjust the opacity.

                          If a photo is too dark try the same as above but blend with screen adjusting
                          the opacity to suite.

                          Chaz UK

                          Taken and printing Photos since 1964



                          No virus found in this outgoing message.
                          Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                          Version: 7.5.472 / Virus Database: 269.8.15/848 - Release Date: 13/06/2007
                          12:50



                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • troubleinseattle
                          Very long exposures can cause problems with digital cameras as they are sensative to thermal noise. But fear not, there are several things you can do... Shoot
                          Message 12 of 12 , Jun 22, 2007
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                            Very long exposures can cause problems with digital cameras as they are
                            sensative to thermal noise. But fear not, there are several things you
                            can do...

                            Shoot teathered and take multiple photos. The bundled software that
                            came with your EOS allows you to control your camera from the computer.
                            From the computer you can set up a timer and have your camera take,
                            say, 1 exposure every 10 seconds. As an added bonus, you can also shoot
                            a time-lapse move.

                            Use a neutral density filter. Photographers of all sorts have been
                            using these for decades. Digitial cameras are not great for taking
                            multi-second images because of thermal noise. So a neutral density
                            filter will only get you so far.

                            Once you have many slower photos you can either select the best photo,
                            or you can stack the images using Photoshop or another tool. Pay
                            attention to the blending mode. I'd recommend you google image stacking
                            as there is a whole art and science behind that.

                            Acutally reducing your image noise...

                            First, if you want the best detail, if image noise is really is a
                            problem with your photos, then image blur will also be a problem.
                            Consider shooting with a very stable tripod on a very stable surface.
                            Nothing will piss you off more than putting much effort into noise
                            reduction only to see that your camera shook a little because the deck
                            your tripod was on wasn't 100% stable.

                            Second, enable long term photo noise reduction. It's a setting in your
                            camera.

                            Third, over expose in your camera then darken the image in photo shop.
                            The idea here is that in digital cameras noise appears in the lower
                            bits of a pixel. Take a few test over exposed images with your camera's
                            histogram enabled. This allows you to see how much you can over expose
                            before you blow you the hilites. After you download the image you
                            darken it, which has the effect of reducing the noise. Again, there is
                            a lot of art and science behind this trick. Search around
                            for "overexpose histogram noise" to learn more.

                            Fourth, blend multiple images. This also has the effect of reducing
                            noise. Again, this must be done carefully because it can also reduce
                            detail


                            --- In canondigicamhacking@yahoogroups.com, "bgebz" <bgebz@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > because i need to take really long exposure shots (Lightning and
                            such) and i need it as dark
                            > as possible, without much grain . but oh well, i guess it won't
                            happen. haha thanks though
                            >
                          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.