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Deck repairs

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  • francis.howard@btinternet.com
    I have to tackle the blistering deck around the stanchions/ genoa tracks on my cn 35-69 this winter, also the hull deck joint. Does anyone know if the water
    Message 1 of 12 , Jun 8, 2012
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      I have to tackle the blistering deck around the stanchions/ genoa tracks on my cn 35-69 this winter, also the hull deck joint. Does anyone know if the water gets into the aluminium sub plates through the leaking hull deck joint or is it from the stanchion fastenings?
    • JIM TEIPEN
      Francis, In my case, water was leaking around the stanchion fasteners. Of course, this causes corrosion of the embedded aluminum backing plates , which
      Message 2 of 12 , Jun 8, 2012
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        Francis, 

        In my case,  water was leaking around the stanchion fasteners.  Of course, this causes corrosion of the embedded aluminum backing plates , which causes the blistering.   I had about 3 such areas where this occurred.   

        To fix them, I removed the stanchions and using a small Dremel like cutting wheel in an electric drill, I surgically cut away all of the blistering.  There is only about 1/4 to 3/8 inch of resin between the top of the deck and the top of the backing plate, so it's not difficult to get it off.   Once you've  cut the blistering away, you will have basically exposed the backing plate.  In my case, the backing plates were mostly intact,  with the exception of the surface corrosion of course.   I used a grinding wheel on an angle grinder to grind out all of the corrosion.  I was fairly aggressive with this operation as I wanted to make sure that I got all the corrosion and was left with nothing but shiny metal. 

        Next I filled the repair area to deck level with WEST epoxy and filler.  BTW: I preserved the original stanchion fastener through deck holes by placing a short piece of dowel in each.  These will become glued in during the epoxying of course, but the dowels are very easy to drill out once the repair is complete. 

        Once I had the epoxy faired to deck level, I recreated the small raised base that the stanchion sits on using some  1/4 inch thick stock fiberglass board cut to the approximate shape.  I epoxyed this in place and later used thickened epoxy to fair around the edges until it matched the shape and size of the original bases.    I finished everything off with a two part white liquid gel coat.  Luckily, the gel matched the existing deck color very well and I didn't have to tint it.  

        This was all maybe 7 or 8 years ago, it still looks good and has held up well.  I may have some pictures of the process if you are interested. 

        Jim 
        SV Alegria
        CN 35 - 68


          




        To: campernicholson@yahoogroups.com
        From: francis.howard@...
        Date: Fri, 8 Jun 2012 17:20:10 +0000
        Subject: [campernicholson] Deck repairs

         
        I have to tackle the blistering deck around the stanchions/ genoa tracks on my cn 35-69 this winter, also the hull deck joint. Does anyone know if the water gets into the aluminium sub plates through the leaking hull deck joint or is it from the stanchion fastenings?


      • Graham Norbury
        If you re grinding far enough to expose the plates, you might as well remove them entirely and replace with something non metallic such as G-10. Embedded
        Message 3 of 12 , Jun 8, 2012
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          If you're grinding far enough to expose the plates, you might as well remove them entirely and replace with something non metallic such as G-10.  Embedded aluminum in a salty environment is a recipe for future woes.

          Graham

          On 06/08/2012 3:32 PM, JIM TEIPEN wrote:
           

          Francis, 

          In my case,  water was leaking around the stanchion fasteners.  Of course, this causes corrosion of the embedded aluminum backing plates , which causes the blistering.   I had about 3 such areas where this occurred.   

          To fix them, I removed the stanchions and using a small Dremel like cutting wheel in an electric drill, I surgically cut away all of the blistering.  There is only about 1/4 to 3/8 inch of resin between the top of the deck and the top of the backing plate, so it's not difficult to get it off.   Once you've  cut the blistering away, you will have basically exposed the backing plate.  In my case, the backing plates were mostly intact,  with the exception of the surface corrosion of course.   I used a grinding wheel on an angle grinder to grind out all of the corrosion.  I was fairly aggressive with this operation as I wanted to make sure that I got all the corrosion and was left with nothing but shiny metal. 

          Next I filled the repair area to deck level with WEST epoxy and filler.  BTW: I preserved the original stanchion fastener through deck holes by placing a short piece of dowel in each.  These will become glued in during the epoxying of course, but the dowels are very easy to drill out once the repair is complete. 

          Once I had the epoxy faired to deck level, I recreated the small raised base that the stanchion sits on using some  1/4 inch thick stock fiberglass board cut to the approximate shape.  I epoxyed this in place and later used thickened epoxy to fair around the edges until it matched the shape and size of the original bases.    I finished everything off with a two part white liquid gel coat.  Luckily, the gel matched the existing deck color very well and I didn't have to tint it.  

          This was all maybe 7 or 8 years ago, it still looks good and has held up well.  I may have some pictures of the process if you are interested. 

          Jim 
          SV Alegria
          CN 35 - 68


            




          To: campernicholson@yahoogroups.com
          From: francis.howard@...
          Date: Fri, 8 Jun 2012 17:20:10 +0000
          Subject: [campernicholson] Deck repairs

           
          I have to tackle the blistering deck around the stanchions/ genoa tracks on my cn 35-69 this winter, also the hull deck joint. Does anyone know if the water gets into the aluminium sub plates through the leaking hull deck joint or is it from the stanchion fastenings?


        • Francis Howard
          Many thanks for that information, Jim. Any pictures of your repair would be great. I had imagined that I would be cutting more material away than that but it
          Message 4 of 12 , Jun 9, 2012
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            Many thanks for that information, Jim. Any pictures of your repair would be great. I had imagined that I would be cutting more material away than that but it would be good to get away with less. I am concerned about the condition of the balsa core, one of the blisters inboard of the genoa track is the size of my hand, I have taken a small core from under the blister and it seems to be dry but till you cut into it you don't really know.  I have big blisters around three stanchion bases and the port track but I can see that the deck is beginning to lift around the other track and the other stanchions except the bow pair so I am minded to do them all. 
            I was wondering if I needed to reinstate the genoa track upstands, did I read somewhere that later models did not have them?
            I have the robin egg blue gell colour, I have assumed that the repair will be easier if I paint the deck up to the coach roof, I want to awlgrip the hull in any case. In fact there are a lot of things I want to do but till the deck is sorted, and the hull deck join fixed I am not going to get carried away!  
            Fair point Graham, I agree it would be best to replace the plates. What is G10? Can you tap into it to fasten the stanchions or would you through bolt?
            Frank.
            On 9 Jun 2012, at 04:13, Graham Norbury <gnorbury@...> wrote:

             

            If you're grinding far enough to expose the plates, you might as well remove them entirely and replace with something non metallic such as G-10.  Embedded aluminum in a salty environment is a recipe for future woes.

            Graham

            On 06/08/2012 3:32 PM, JIM TEIPEN wrote:

             

            Francis, 

            In my case,  water was leaking around the stanchion fasteners.  Of course, this causes corrosion of the embedded aluminum backing plates , which causes the blistering.   I had about 3 such areas where this occurred.   

            To fix them, I removed the stanchions and using a small Dremel like cutting wheel in an electric drill, I surgically cut away all of the blistering.  There is only about 1/4 to 3/8 inch of resin between the top of the deck and the top of the backing plate, so it's not difficult to get it off.   Once you've  cut the blistering away, you will have basically exposed the backing plate.  In my case, the backing plates were mostly intact,  with the exception of the surface corrosion of course.   I used a grinding wheel on an angle grinder to grind out all of the corrosion.  I was fairly aggressive with this operation as I wanted to make sure that I got all the corrosion and was left with nothing but shiny metal. 

            Next I filled the repair area to deck level with WEST epoxy and filler.  BTW: I preserved the original stanchion fastener through deck holes by placing a short piece of dowel in each.  These will become glued in during the epoxying of course, but the dowels are very easy to drill out once the repair is complete. 

            Once I had the epoxy faired to deck level, I recreated the small raised base that the stanchion sits on using some  1/4 inch thick stock fiberglass board cut to the approximate shape.  I epoxyed this in place and later used thickened epoxy to fair around the edges until it matched the shape and size of the original bases.    I finished everything off with a two part white liquid gel coat.  Luckily, the gel matched the existing deck color very well and I didn't have to tint it.  

            This was all maybe 7 or 8 years ago, it still looks good and has held up well.  I may have some pictures of the process if you are interested. 

            Jim 
            SV Alegria
            CN 35 - 68


              




            To: campernicholson@yahoogroups.com
            From: francis.howard@...
            Date: Fri, 8 Jun 2012 17:20:10 +0000
            Subject: [campernicholson] Deck repairs

             
            I have to tackle the blistering deck around the stanchions/ genoa tracks on my cn 35-69 this winter, also the hull deck joint. Does anyone know if the water gets into the aluminium sub plates through the leaking hull deck joint or is it from the stanchion fastenings?


          • Graham Norbury
            G-10, also known as garolite, is an epoxy-fiberglass material that is extremely dense and makes excellent backing blocks. It definitely can be drilled and
            Message 5 of 12 , Jun 9, 2012
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              G-10, also known as garolite, is an epoxy-fiberglass material that is extremely dense and makes excellent backing blocks.  It definitely can be drilled and tapped very successfully, but generally I would advocate through-bolting for a safety critical application such as stanchions.   It can be cut with a table saw using a carbide tipped blade, or with a jigsaw using a diamond abrasive blade.  Wear a mask while cutting - the dust is hard on your lungs.

              Graham

              On 06/09/2012 1:06 PM, Francis Howard wrote:  
              Many thanks for that information, Jim. Any pictures of your repair would be great. I had imagined that I would be cutting more material away than that but it would be good to get away with less. I am concerned about the condition of the balsa core, one of the blisters inboard of the genoa track is the size of my hand, I have taken a small core from under the blister and it seems to be dry but till you cut into it you don't really know.  I have big blisters around three stanchion bases and the port track but I can see that the deck is beginning to lift around the other track and the other stanchions except the bow pair so I am minded to do them all. 
              I was wondering if I needed to reinstate the genoa track upstands, did I read somewhere that later models did not have them?
              I have the robin egg blue gell colour, I have assumed that the repair will be easier if I paint the deck up to the coach roof, I want to awlgrip the hull in any case. In fact there are a lot of things I want to do but till the deck is sorted, and the hull deck join fixed I am not going to get carried away!  
              Fair point Graham, I agree it would be best to replace the plates. What is G10? Can you tap into it to fasten the stanchions or would you through bolt?
              Frank.
              On 9 Jun 2012, at 04:13, Graham Norbury <gnorbury@...> wrote:

               

              If you're grinding far enough to expose the plates, you might as well remove them entirely and replace with something non metallic such as G-10.  Embedded aluminum in a salty environment is a recipe for future woes.

              Graham

              On 06/08/2012 3:32 PM, JIM TEIPEN wrote:

               

              Francis, 

              In my case,  water was leaking around the stanchion fasteners.  Of course, this causes corrosion of the embedded aluminum backing plates , which causes the blistering.   I had about 3 such areas where this occurred.   

              To fix them, I removed the stanchions and using a small Dremel like cutting wheel in an electric drill, I surgically cut away all of the blistering.  There is only about 1/4 to 3/8 inch of resin between the top of the deck and the top of the backing plate, so it's not difficult to get it off.   Once you've  cut the blistering away, you will have basically exposed the backing plate.  In my case, the backing plates were mostly intact,  with the exception of the surface corrosion of course.   I used a grinding wheel on an angle grinder to grind out all of the corrosion.  I was fairly aggressive with this operation as I wanted to make sure that I got all the corrosion and was left with nothing but shiny metal. 

              Next I filled the repair area to deck level with WEST epoxy and filler.  BTW: I preserved the original stanchion fastener through deck holes by placing a short piece of dowel in each.  These will become glued in during the epoxying of course, but the dowels are very easy to drill out once the repair is complete. 

              Once I had the epoxy faired to deck level, I recreated the small raised base that the stanchion sits on using some  1/4 inch thick stock fiberglass board cut to the approximate shape.  I epoxyed this in place and later used thickened epoxy to fair around the edges until it matched the shape and size of the original bases.    I finished everything off with a two part white liquid gel coat.  Luckily, the gel matched the existing deck color very well and I didn't have to tint it.  

              This was all maybe 7 or 8 years ago, it still looks good and has held up well.  I may have some pictures of the process if you are interested. 

              Jim 
              SV Alegria
              CN 35 - 68


                




              To: campernicholson@yahoogroups.com
              From: francis.howard@...
              Date: Fri, 8 Jun 2012 17:20:10 +0000
              Subject: [campernicholson] Deck repairs

               
              I have to tackle the blistering deck around the stanchions/ genoa tracks on my cn 35-69 this winter, also the hull deck joint. Does anyone know if the water gets into the aluminium sub plates through the leaking hull deck joint or is it from the stanchion fastenings?


          • MarkH
            ... I totally agree regarding the aluminum plates!! Its hard to believe any builder would burry aluminum within a composite structure. When the salt water
            Message 6 of 12 , Jun 13, 2012
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              --- In campernicholson@yahoogroups.com, Graham Norbury <gnorbury@...> wrote:
              >
              > If you're grinding far enough to expose the plates, you might as well
              > remove them entirely and replace with something non metallic such as
              > G-10. Embedded aluminum in a salty environment is a recipe for future woes.
              >
              > Graham
              >
              > On 06/08/2012 3:32 PM, JIM TEIPEN wrote:
              > >
              > > Francis,
              > >
              > > In my case, water was leaking around the stanchion fasteners. Of
              > > course, this causes corrosion of the embedded aluminum backing plates
              > > , which causes the blistering. I had about 3 such areas where this
              > > occurred.
              > >


              I totally agree regarding the aluminum plates!! Its hard to believe any builder would burry aluminum within a composite structure. When the salt water gets in (and it will) the aluminum will swell to about double its thickness. and blow everything away in its path. My Camper had aluminum plates embedded in the lazerette hatch cover with SS screws tapped into them to anchor the SS hinges. I had to dig out all aluminum and the wrecked wood as well. I rebuilt using solid epoxy and glass. Expanding aluminum split open the entire hatch and exposed the interior wood and core to water.
            • alveng
              Hi! It could be both. I had it on my Peldon Rose. I have written about it in earlier threads. The hull/deck joint damage is probebly a result of leakage from
              Message 7 of 12 , Jun 14, 2012
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                Hi!
                It could be both. I had it on my Peldon Rose. I have written about it in earlier threads. The hull/deck joint damage is probebly a result of leakage from the stanchions, or the teaklist.
                I have a lot of pictures, new drawings and description of the work I did this winter.
                About the aluminum plates in the deck: I have mounted new ones. Its okey to do this if you use waterproof materials ALL the way. When You have removed the od ones, and dug out the bad balsa, then every new layer should be waterproof.
                Please let me know if you need some pdf's

                best regards
                Torbjørn Alveng

                --- In campernicholson@yahoogroups.com, "francis.howard@..." <francis.howard@...> wrote:
                >
                > I have to tackle the blistering deck around the stanchions/ genoa tracks on my cn 35-69 this winter, also the hull deck joint. Does anyone know if the water gets into the aluminium sub plates through the leaking hull deck joint or is it from the stanchion fastenings?
                >
              • francis.howard@btinternet.com
                Hi Torbjorn Many thanks for those PDF files with the drawings which are incredibly useful. I hope I don t have to go quite as far as you did but I may find I
                Message 8 of 12 , Jun 14, 2012
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                  Hi Torbjorn
                  Many thanks for those PDF files with the drawings which are incredibly useful. I hope I don't have to go quite as far as you did but I may find I have to if the balsa is degraded. I am assuming that you painted your decks, was it easy to match up the non slip texture? I am in the process if lining up a yard to do the work this winter but it's good to see what I may be letting myself in for. I hope that you are getting some sailing this summer after all that work, it looks a great job by the way.

                  Frank

                  --- In campernicholson@yahoogroups.com, "alveng" <torbjorn@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hi!
                  > It could be both. I had it on my Peldon Rose. I have written about it in earlier threads. The hull/deck joint damage is probebly a result of leakage from the stanchions, or the teaklist.
                  > I have a lot of pictures, new drawings and description of the work I did this winter.
                  > About the aluminum plates in the deck: I have mounted new ones. Its okey to do this if you use waterproof materials ALL the way. When You have removed the od ones, and dug out the bad balsa, then every new layer should be waterproof.
                  > Please let me know if you need some pdf's
                  >
                  > best regards
                  > Torbjørn Alveng
                  >
                  > --- In campernicholson@yahoogroups.com, "francis.howard@" <francis.howard@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > I have to tackle the blistering deck around the stanchions/ genoa tracks on my cn 35-69 this winter, also the hull deck joint. Does anyone know if the water gets into the aluminium sub plates through the leaking hull deck joint or is it from the stanchion fastenings?
                  > >
                  >
                • alveng
                  It was a great job. I was out yesterday, and got a useful reminder. Before the work, when i was sailing in heavy winds, the stayers on one side hang a bit
                  Message 9 of 12 , Jun 18, 2012
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                    It was a great job. I was out yesterday, and got a useful reminder. Before the work, when i was sailing in heavy winds, the stayers on one side hang a bit loose. Now, after the upgrade I sail in very heavy winds, and there is no movement in the stays. So this means that the construction with just a plate underneath the deck is not as good as when its is fastned to the hull. Just want to share this with you.
                    The paint i used, is a french paint. I dont know the manufacturer, but I can get it if you want. The colour was hard to find, but we faound it. Its a bit greyer than the originally light blue, that matches the sun bleech after almost 40 years.....



                    --- In campernicholson@yahoogroups.com, "francis.howard@..." <francis.howard@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Hi Torbjorn
                    > Many thanks for those PDF files with the drawings which are incredibly useful. I hope I don't have to go quite as far as you did but I may find I have to if the balsa is degraded. I am assuming that you painted your decks, was it easy to match up the non slip texture? I am in the process if lining up a yard to do the work this winter but it's good to see what I may be letting myself in for. I hope that you are getting some sailing this summer after all that work, it looks a great job by the way.
                    >
                    > Frank
                    >
                    > --- In campernicholson@yahoogroups.com, "alveng" <torbjorn@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Hi!
                    > > It could be both. I had it on my Peldon Rose. I have written about it in earlier threads. The hull/deck joint damage is probebly a result of leakage from the stanchions, or the teaklist.
                    > > I have a lot of pictures, new drawings and description of the work I did this winter.
                    > > About the aluminum plates in the deck: I have mounted new ones. Its okey to do this if you use waterproof materials ALL the way. When You have removed the od ones, and dug out the bad balsa, then every new layer should be waterproof.
                    > > Please let me know if you need some pdf's
                    > >
                    > > best regards
                    > > Torbjørn Alveng
                    > >
                    > > --- In campernicholson@yahoogroups.com, "francis.howard@" <francis.howard@> wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > I have to tackle the blistering deck around the stanchions/ genoa tracks on my cn 35-69 this winter, also the hull deck joint. Does anyone know if the water gets into the aluminium sub plates through the leaking hull deck joint or is it from the stanchion fastenings?
                    > > >
                    > >
                    >
                  • francis.howard@btinternet.com
                    Torbjorn, I can see why your chain plates are so much better, I was surprised that the original backing pads are so small, but on the other hand they have
                    Message 10 of 12 , Jun 20, 2012
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                      Torbjorn,
                      I can see why your chain plates are so much better, I was surprised that the original backing pads are so small, but on the other hand they have survived for the last 40 years. I was thinking of painting the deck with awlcraft but if you had it handy I would be interested to know the name of the french paint you used.
                      Frank

                      --- In campernicholson@yahoogroups.com, "alveng" <torbjorn@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > It was a great job. I was out yesterday, and got a useful reminder. Before the work, when i was sailing in heavy winds, the stayers on one side hang a bit loose. Now, after the upgrade I sail in very heavy winds, and there is no movement in the stays. So this means that the construction with just a plate underneath the deck is not as good as when its is fastned to the hull. Just want to share this with you.
                      > The paint i used, is a french paint. I dont know the manufacturer, but I can get it if you want. The colour was hard to find, but we faound it. Its a bit greyer than the originally light blue, that matches the sun bleech after almost 40 years.....
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > --- In campernicholson@yahoogroups.com, "francis.howard@" <francis.howard@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Hi Torbjorn
                      > > Many thanks for those PDF files with the drawings which are incredibly useful. I hope I don't have to go quite as far as you did but I may find I have to if the balsa is degraded. I am assuming that you painted your decks, was it easy to match up the non slip texture? I am in the process if lining up a yard to do the work this winter but it's good to see what I may be letting myself in for. I hope that you are getting some sailing this summer after all that work, it looks a great job by the way.
                      > >
                      > > Frank
                      > >
                      > > --- In campernicholson@yahoogroups.com, "alveng" <torbjorn@> wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > > Hi!
                      > > > It could be both. I had it on my Peldon Rose. I have written about it in earlier threads. The hull/deck joint damage is probebly a result of leakage from the stanchions, or the teaklist.
                      > > > I have a lot of pictures, new drawings and description of the work I did this winter.
                      > > > About the aluminum plates in the deck: I have mounted new ones. Its okey to do this if you use waterproof materials ALL the way. When You have removed the od ones, and dug out the bad balsa, then every new layer should be waterproof.
                      > > > Please let me know if you need some pdf's
                      > > >
                      > > > best regards
                      > > > Torbjørn Alveng
                      > > >
                      > > > --- In campernicholson@yahoogroups.com, "francis.howard@" <francis.howard@> wrote:
                      > > > >
                      > > > > I have to tackle the blistering deck around the stanchions/ genoa tracks on my cn 35-69 this winter, also the hull deck joint. Does anyone know if the water gets into the aluminium sub plates through the leaking hull deck joint or is it from the stanchion fastenings?
                      > > > >
                      > > >
                      > >
                      >
                    • alveng
                      Take as look at my new album New Peldon Rose and see the result! I hav sent for the name of the deck-paint (Its very very good!) and i will let you know
                      Message 11 of 12 , Jun 21, 2012
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                        Take as look at my new album "New Peldon Rose" and see the result! I hav sent for the name of the deck-paint (Its very very good!) and i will let you know imideately! By the way - are you on facebook?
                        You can look me up: Torbjørn Alveng, I have many pictures of the boat and how I did things with her :-)

                        --- In campernicholson@yahoogroups.com, "francis.howard@..." <francis.howard@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Torbjorn,
                        > I can see why your chain plates are so much better, I was surprised that the original backing pads are so small, but on the other hand they have survived for the last 40 years. I was thinking of painting the deck with awlcraft but if you had it handy I would be interested to know the name of the french paint you used.
                        > Frank
                        >
                        > --- In campernicholson@yahoogroups.com, "alveng" <torbjorn@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > It was a great job. I was out yesterday, and got a useful reminder. Before the work, when i was sailing in heavy winds, the stayers on one side hang a bit loose. Now, after the upgrade I sail in very heavy winds, and there is no movement in the stays. So this means that the construction with just a plate underneath the deck is not as good as when its is fastned to the hull. Just want to share this with you.
                        > > The paint i used, is a french paint. I dont know the manufacturer, but I can get it if you want. The colour was hard to find, but we faound it. Its a bit greyer than the originally light blue, that matches the sun bleech after almost 40 years.....
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > --- In campernicholson@yahoogroups.com, "francis.howard@" <francis.howard@> wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > Hi Torbjorn
                        > > > Many thanks for those PDF files with the drawings which are incredibly useful. I hope I don't have to go quite as far as you did but I may find I have to if the balsa is degraded. I am assuming that you painted your decks, was it easy to match up the non slip texture? I am in the process if lining up a yard to do the work this winter but it's good to see what I may be letting myself in for. I hope that you are getting some sailing this summer after all that work, it looks a great job by the way.
                        > > >
                        > > > Frank
                        > > >
                        > > > --- In campernicholson@yahoogroups.com, "alveng" <torbjorn@> wrote:
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Hi!
                        > > > > It could be both. I had it on my Peldon Rose. I have written about it in earlier threads. The hull/deck joint damage is probebly a result of leakage from the stanchions, or the teaklist.
                        > > > > I have a lot of pictures, new drawings and description of the work I did this winter.
                        > > > > About the aluminum plates in the deck: I have mounted new ones. Its okey to do this if you use waterproof materials ALL the way. When You have removed the od ones, and dug out the bad balsa, then every new layer should be waterproof.
                        > > > > Please let me know if you need some pdf's
                        > > > >
                        > > > > best regards
                        > > > > Torbjørn Alveng
                        > > > >
                        > > > > --- In campernicholson@yahoogroups.com, "francis.howard@" <francis.howard@> wrote:
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > I have to tackle the blistering deck around the stanchions/ genoa tracks on my cn 35-69 this winter, also the hull deck joint. Does anyone know if the water gets into the aluminium sub plates through the leaking hull deck joint or is it from the stanchion fastenings?
                        > > > > >
                        > > > >
                        > > >
                        > >
                        >
                      • alveng
                        Its a DuPont paint, and its called Imron ... http://pc.dupont.com/dpc/en/US/html/visitor/b/imr/home.html Torbjørn
                        Message 12 of 12 , Jun 21, 2012
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                          Its a DuPont paint, and its called Imron
                          :-)
                          http://pc.dupont.com/dpc/en/US/html/visitor/b/imr/home.html

                          Torbjørn

                          --- In campernicholson@yahoogroups.com, "francis.howard@..." <francis.howard@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Torbjorn,
                          > I can see why your chain plates are so much better, I was surprised that the original backing pads are so small, but on the other hand they have survived for the last 40 years. I was thinking of painting the deck with awlcraft but if you had it handy I would be interested to know the name of the french paint you used.
                          > Frank
                          >
                          > --- In campernicholson@yahoogroups.com, "alveng" <torbjorn@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > It was a great job. I was out yesterday, and got a useful reminder. Before the work, when i was sailing in heavy winds, the stayers on one side hang a bit loose. Now, after the upgrade I sail in very heavy winds, and there is no movement in the stays. So this means that the construction with just a plate underneath the deck is not as good as when its is fastned to the hull. Just want to share this with you.
                          > > The paint i used, is a french paint. I dont know the manufacturer, but I can get it if you want. The colour was hard to find, but we faound it. Its a bit greyer than the originally light blue, that matches the sun bleech after almost 40 years.....
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > --- In campernicholson@yahoogroups.com, "francis.howard@" <francis.howard@> wrote:
                          > > >
                          > > > Hi Torbjorn
                          > > > Many thanks for those PDF files with the drawings which are incredibly useful. I hope I don't have to go quite as far as you did but I may find I have to if the balsa is degraded. I am assuming that you painted your decks, was it easy to match up the non slip texture? I am in the process if lining up a yard to do the work this winter but it's good to see what I may be letting myself in for. I hope that you are getting some sailing this summer after all that work, it looks a great job by the way.
                          > > >
                          > > > Frank
                          > > >
                          > > > --- In campernicholson@yahoogroups.com, "alveng" <torbjorn@> wrote:
                          > > > >
                          > > > > Hi!
                          > > > > It could be both. I had it on my Peldon Rose. I have written about it in earlier threads. The hull/deck joint damage is probebly a result of leakage from the stanchions, or the teaklist.
                          > > > > I have a lot of pictures, new drawings and description of the work I did this winter.
                          > > > > About the aluminum plates in the deck: I have mounted new ones. Its okey to do this if you use waterproof materials ALL the way. When You have removed the od ones, and dug out the bad balsa, then every new layer should be waterproof.
                          > > > > Please let me know if you need some pdf's
                          > > > >
                          > > > > best regards
                          > > > > Torbjørn Alveng
                          > > > >
                          > > > > --- In campernicholson@yahoogroups.com, "francis.howard@" <francis.howard@> wrote:
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > > I have to tackle the blistering deck around the stanchions/ genoa tracks on my cn 35-69 this winter, also the hull deck joint. Does anyone know if the water gets into the aluminium sub plates through the leaking hull deck joint or is it from the stanchion fastenings?
                          > > > > >
                          > > > >
                          > > >
                          > >
                          >
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