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Re: [campernicholson] replacement of port windows

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  • Graham Norbury
    Manufacturers use acrylic because it s cheap, is easily worked/formed and can be bedded with many common sealants. MR10 by comparison, costs around $800/sheet
    Message 1 of 16 , Nov 14, 2011
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      Manufacturers use acrylic because it's cheap, is easily worked/formed and can be bedded with many common sealants. 
      MR10 by comparison, costs around $800/sheet and has so very specific do's/don'ts related to fasteners and sealants.  For the last couple years it has also been hard to obtain in small quantities.

      Just because manufacturers working to a price point commonly use acrylic does not necessarily make it the best choice.  As an analogy, many small metal parts are manufacturer by the MIM (metal injection molding) process because it is cost effective to do so.  Does that automatically make an MIM component superior to its forged or machined equivalent?

      Graham


      On 11/14/2011 4:49 PM, Brian Stannard wrote:  

      Every hatch manufacturer except Bomar uses acrylic as do most of the port manufacturers if not glass.  Bomar hatches have the cross beams across the center so the flex in the polycarbonate they use doesn't break the seal.

      On Mon, Nov 14, 2011 at 10:57 AM, Graham Norbury <gnorbury@...> wrote:
       

      MR10 (a type of polycarbonate) is generally what we use in the industry for hatch glass replacement. It is way more scratch resistant than acrylic, and more impact resistant too.

      Acrylic is however much cheaper, so for vertical windows that won't be walked on it would be ok.

      Graham

      Brian Stannard <brianstannard@...> wrote:
       

      The best material for ports is acrylic (plexiglass) as it is less liable to scratch and will not craze after decades. Polycarbonate (Lexan) crazes in a few years usually.

      On Mon, Nov 14, 2011 at 8:13 AM, <jarvis.cribb@...> wrote:
       

      This winter i plan to replace lights in cabin of Spray 215year 1984

      questions I have:

      what is best material for windows?

      what is best material to get a lastng seal around windows?

      Anyone with info on this -please let me know.

      Jarvis.cribb@...


      From: "JOHN LARSON" <jsl-sll@...>
      To: "campernicholson" <campernicholson@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Sunday, November 13, 2011 2:40:17 PM
      Subject: RE: [campernicholson] black "plastic" inserts in companionway steps



      Bob

      We replaced the strips on Passport almost ten years ago by removing the black stuff from the aluminum channel and replacing it with black treadmaster.  We were able to get Treadmaster with a adhesive back so all that was required was to trim it to size. 

      John Larson
      Passport
      35-85







      --
      Cheers
      Brian





      --
      Cheers
      Brian


    • Brian Stannard
      They use acrylic because it outlasts polycarbonate by a large margin and doesn t scratch as easily. Lewmar, Goiot and others. Select Plastics, the largest
      Message 2 of 16 , Nov 14, 2011
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        They use acrylic because it outlasts polycarbonate by a large margin and doesn't scratch as easily. Lewmar, Goiot and others. Select Plastics, the largest marine hatch repair facility in the world, uses cast acrylic. 
        http://www.selectplastics.com/index.php/Marine-Hatch-Repair/Plastic-Products/marine-products.html

        On Mon, Nov 14, 2011 at 2:20 PM, Graham Norbury <gnorbury@...> wrote:
         

        Manufacturers use acrylic because it's cheap, is easily worked/formed and can be bedded with many common sealants. 
        MR10 by comparison, costs around $800/sheet and has so very specific do's/don'ts related to fasteners and sealants.  For the last couple years it has also been hard to obtain in small quantities.

        Just because manufacturers working to a price point commonly use acrylic does not necessarily make it the best choice.  As an analogy, many small metal parts are manufacturer by the MIM (metal injection molding) process because it is cost effective to do so.  Does that automatically make an MIM component superior to its forged or machined equivalent?

        Graham


        On 11/14/2011 4:49 PM, Brian Stannard wrote:

         

        Every hatch manufacturer except Bomar uses acrylic as do most of the port manufacturers if not glass.  Bomar hatches have the cross beams across the center so the flex in the polycarbonate they use doesn't break the seal.

        On Mon, Nov 14, 2011 at 10:57 AM, Graham Norbury <gnorbury@...> wrote:
         

        MR10 (a type of polycarbonate) is generally what we use in the industry for hatch glass replacement. It is way more scratch resistant than acrylic, and more impact resistant too.

        Acrylic is however much cheaper, so for vertical windows that won't be walked on it would be ok.

        Graham

        Brian Stannard <brianstannard@...> wrote:
         

        The best material for ports is acrylic (plexiglass) as it is less liable to scratch and will not craze after decades. Polycarbonate (Lexan) crazes in a few years usually.

        On Mon, Nov 14, 2011 at 8:13 AM, <jarvis.cribb@...> wrote:
         

        This winter i plan to replace lights in cabin of Spray 215year 1984

        questions I have:

        what is best material for windows?

        what is best material to get a lastng seal around windows?

        Anyone with info on this -please let me know.

        Jarvis.cribb@...


        From: "JOHN LARSON" <jsl-sll@...>
        To: "campernicholson" <campernicholson@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Sunday, November 13, 2011 2:40:17 PM
        Subject: RE: [campernicholson] black "plastic" inserts in companionway steps



        Bob

        We replaced the strips on Passport almost ten years ago by removing the black stuff from the aluminum channel and replacing it with black treadmaster.  We were able to get Treadmaster with a adhesive back so all that was required was to trim it to size. 

        John Larson
        Passport
        35-85







        --
        Cheers
        Brian





        --
        Cheers
        Brian





        --
        Cheers
        Brian


      • MarkH
        The first place I look for plastics in general is Google search or: http://www.mcmaster.com/#polycarbonate-sheets/=exoltl
        Message 3 of 16 , Nov 14, 2011
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          The first place I look for plastics in general is Google search or:

          http://www.mcmaster.com/#polycarbonate-sheets/=exoltl

          http://www.totalplastics.com/products/5

          You are correct - not cheap, but you do expect another 25 years.
        • johnbaillie@btinternet.com
          Jarvis, I think that I responded to a similar question perhaps 18 months ago. The first place that I would go to for clear, black or other coloured acrylic is
          Message 4 of 16 , Nov 14, 2011
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            Jarvis,

            I think that I responded to a similar question perhaps 18 months ago.

            The first place that I would go to for clear, black or other coloured acrylic is a local sign maker, getting away from the hefty marine price mark-up. Two years or so ago I took templates of pieces I wanted to the sign maker in neighbouring Kintore. We agreed the colour and thickness of the acrylic and his computer system cut out exact copies. He also drilled holes where I wanted, to avoid my cracking or spalling the surface.

            As you won't need holes drilled for window panes, I would expect the cost for 4 saloon panes to be under £50.

            I agree with Jim Teipen about sealant. I took the frames off Amaryllis windows about three seasons ago, cleaned off all the green gunge and filled the cavity and edges of the windows generously with clear silicone sealant. It's easy to apply with the hand gun, gives a good, flexible seal and you just wipe off excess or cut it back once it's hardened. I don't think that the manufacturer is too important, but use a good exterior quality grade. I've had no suspicions of leaks, even this summer coming back from Norway close reaching in F7/ 8 winds with steep seas breaking over the boat for over 24 hours.

            As the windows don't open there is no need to fit foam which I imagine would be more fiddly and time consuming and unless it were of a closed cell type could act as a sponge.

            No doubt you'll get as many views as there are contributors.

            John Baillie,

            Amaryllis, CN35 #165

             

             


            --- In campernicholson@yahoogroups.com, "MarkH" <tornado186@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > The first place I look for plastics in general is Google search or:
            >
            > http://www.mcmaster.com/#polycarbonate-sheets/=exoltl
            >
            > http://www.totalplastics.com/products/5
            >
            > You are correct - not cheap, but you do expect another 25 years.
            >

          • J. Waldram
            I have used: http://www.rplastics.com/lexan-polycarbonate-sheet.html for several projects. Jim Waldram Ronnie Nicholson 35, #98
            Message 5 of 16 , Nov 14, 2011
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              I have used:
              http://www.rplastics.com/lexan-polycarbonate-sheet.html
              for several projects.

              Jim Waldram

              Ronnie
              Nicholson 35, #98
            • Graham Norbury
              Uncoated polycarbonate does indeed scratch more easily than acrylic, but MR10 has a hard coating that both protects it from scratching and UV damage and it
              Message 6 of 16 , Nov 14, 2011
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                Uncoated polycarbonate does indeed scratch more easily than acrylic, but MR10 has a hard coating that both protects it from scratching and UV damage and it comes with a 10yr warranty against the latter.  More info here: http://www.usplastic.com/catalog/item.aspx?itemid=23753

                Graham

                On 11/14/2011 5:34 PM, Brian Stannard wrote:  

                They use acrylic because it outlasts polycarbonate by a large margin and doesn't scratch as easily. Lewmar, Goiot and others. Select Plastics, the largest marine hatch repair facility in the world, uses cast acrylic. 

                http://www.selectplastics.com/index.php/Marine-Hatch-Repair/Plastic-Products/marine-products.html

                On Mon, Nov 14, 2011 at 2:20 PM, Graham Norbury <gnorbury@...> wrote:
                 

                Manufacturers use acrylic because it's cheap, is easily worked/formed and can be bedded with many common sealants. 
                MR10 by comparison, costs around $800/sheet and has so very specific do's/don'ts related to fasteners and sealants.  For the last couple years it has also been hard to obtain in small quantities.

                Just because manufacturers working to a price point commonly use acrylic does not necessarily make it the best choice.  As an analogy, many small metal parts are manufacturer by the MIM (metal injection molding) process because it is cost effective to do so.  Does that automatically make an MIM component superior to its forged or machined equivalent?

                Graham


                On 11/14/2011 4:49 PM, Brian Stannard wrote:

                 

                Every hatch manufacturer except Bomar uses acrylic as do most of the port manufacturers if not glass.  Bomar hatches have the cross beams across the center so the flex in the polycarbonate they use doesn't break the seal.

                On Mon, Nov 14, 2011 at 10:57 AM, Graham Norbury <gnorbury@...> wrote:
                 

                MR10 (a type of polycarbonate) is generally what we use in the industry for hatch glass replacement. It is way more scratch resistant than acrylic, and more impact resistant too.

                Acrylic is however much cheaper, so for vertical windows that won't be walked on it would be ok.

                Graham

                Brian Stannard <brianstannard@...>wrote:
                 

                The best material for ports is acrylic (plexiglass) as it is less liable to scratch and will not craze after decades. Polycarbonate (Lexan) crazes in a few years usually.

                On Mon, Nov 14, 2011 at 8:13 AM, <jarvis.cribb@...> wrote:
                 

                This winter i plan to replace lights in cabin of Spray 215year 1984

                questions I have:

                what is best material for windows?

                what is best material to get a lastng seal around windows?

                Anyone with info on this -please let me know.

                Jarvis.cribb@...


                From: "JOHNLARSON" <jsl-sll@...>
                To: "campernicholson"<campernicholson@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Sunday,November 13, 2011 2:40:17 PM
                Subject: RE:[campernicholson] black "plastic" inserts in companionway steps



                Bob

                We replaced the strips on Passport almost ten years ago by removing the black stuff from the aluminum channel and replacing it with black treadmaster.  We were able to get Treadmaster with a adhesive back so all that was required was to trim it to size. 

                John Larson
                Passport
                35-85







                --
                Cheers
                Brian





                --
                Cheers
                Brian





                --
                Cheers
                Brian


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