Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [campernicholson] Re: Inner Forestay

Expand Messages
  • john crosby
    Dear Rick, I just realised I didn t make clear that mine is a removable inner stay - I just presumed that was what you thinking of adding. With that in mind,
    Message 1 of 18 , Jun 23, 2011
    Dear Rick,

    I just realised I didn't make clear that mine is a removable inner stay - I just presumed that was what you thinking of adding. With that in mind, to answer your questions:

    - location of the deck fitting: like Graham, I use the aft hole on the stem-head fitting, fitting a high load shackle through it when needed and to which I connect the adjuster;
    - location of the mast fitting: the inner stay is connected about 6in below the top, with the opening (ie sheave box) for the dedicated halyard about 6 inches further below, see attached photo (sorry don't know how to add it to our yahoo group). The inner stay is connected with T terminal backing plate into the mast which, according the professional rigger that did the job, is easier than a nose tang;
    - running backstays: no, I didn't add any. The rigger said they weren't needed as long as the inner stay was attached within a certain distance of the top (which it is);,
    - tie rod below deck: no I didn't add one - again the riger said this wasn't necessary as the deck fitting is so close to the fitting of the normal stay;
    - additional winches: no, I use the normal for the sheets and the winch on the port side of mast (hence, if you intend to fit a dedicated halyard and it's feed is inside the mast, I suggest you should make sure it exits on the port side of the mast);
    tracks for sheeting: I use the normal foresail track, which seems fine for the No.2 jib which is what I use most often in this step up. As you probably know, there are dedicated points on the deck each sidse in which to screw in an upright O ring (don't know how else to describe it), through which to run the sheets for the storm jib;
    quick release at the deck fitting: I use a Wichard babystay/forestay adjuster, which still works great even thought its an older version with a nut adjustment rather than the handle, rachet or wheel adjuster available today. There are other adjuster makes as you are probably aware. I've marked the adjuster so I know how far to tighten it without always having to check, mindful that the backstay can also be adjusted to give more aft mast bend as necessary;
    other info: the inner stay is 7mm; the spinnaker halyard probably could work, but there is always that feeling that it could catch on the forestay, when you desperately do not want it to.

    regards John


    From: Rick <wisp03@...>
    To: campernicholson@yahoogroups.com
    Sent: Thursday, 23 June 2011, 13:34
    Subject: [campernicholson] Re: Inner Forestay

     
    John,
    Thanks for responding. There's several things I like to know about your installion.

    Where did you locate the deck fitting
    Where did you locate the mast fitting
    Did you add running backstays
    Did you add a tie rod below deck
    Did you add additional winches
    Where did you locate any tracks for sheeting
    Did you use some type of quick release at the deck fitting
    And,,,any others advice you might have.

    I had a Cape Dory 30 Cutter before the Nic and always enjoyed the flexibility of the rig. I still have hank on sails, which makes that additional sail even more appealling.

    Thanks again for your input.

    Rick

    --- In campernicholson@yahoogroups.com, john crosby <john57crosby@...> wrote:
    >
    > Yes, I did about 2 years ago - and I'm very pleased I did. What info would you like? regards John, Boreas J, Hull No. 178
    >
    >
    >
    > ________________________________
    > From: Rick <wisp03@...>
    > To: campernicholson@yahoogroups.com
    > Sent: Wednesday, 22 June 2011, 21:10
    > Subject: [campernicholson] Inner Forestay
    >
    >
    >  
    > Howdy,
    > Has anyone added an inner forestay to their CN35 ?
    > Thanks for any info.
    > Rick
    > Nic35 141 'Wisp'
    >



  • MARK HOENKE
    Our Camper 58 is cutter rigged ketch. The inner stay is from the upper spreader parallel to the forestay so it lands about 8 feet aft of the stem fitting.
    Message 2 of 18 , Jun 23, 2011

      Our Camper 58 is cutter rigged ketch.  The inner stay is from the upper spreader parallel to the forestay so it lands about 8 feet aft of the stem fitting.  There are running backs to port and starboard winches at the cockpit.  The inner stay is a roller furling ProFurl Clasic 42.  The inner jib is then a 2/3 hoist that fills the space to the mast. Below deck is a SS rod & turnbuckle to the keel to buck up the deck fitting.  The Genoa is unmanageable except to furl.  I am considering adding a solent rig or code zero or both to the aft end of the stem fitting to be operated with a spare jib halyard.  This will let us run a large drifter/reacher or a storm jib.

    • Denece
      WE also added an solent stay to Blue Pearl. It attaches to the mast about three feet from top and to deck right foreward of windlass. No running backs, no
      Message 3 of 18 , Jun 24, 2011
        WE also added an solent stay to Blue Pearl. It attaches to the mast
        about three feet from top and to deck right foreward of windlass. No
        running backs, no tie-down. The rigger said we were bulletproof
        (whatever that means) we have a johnson adjuster that clips on and the
        stay when not used is lashed to foreward lower hairpin at deck.
        That said, we are awaiting further news of a possibility of moving her
        back to the SF area reasonably. Barring that we will have no choice but
        to list her for sale.

        Denece
        Blue Pearl
        #163
      • Gary Noble
        Hi Mark The inner forestay conversation is very interesting. On the CN 30 due to its racing genesis is just a stay positioned to allow the the mast to be
        Message 4 of 18 , Jun 27, 2011
          Hi Mark
          The inner forestay conversation is very interesting. On the CN 30 due to its racing genesis is just a stay positioned to allow the the mast to be bent by adjusting the back stay and the shape the somewhat tiny main.On the CN35s with the taller rigs one can see the stay would have other uses but not sure as I have only sailed on a 35 with the regular mast height.
          Gary S?V Whakarra.

          --- On Fri, 6/24/11, MARK HOENKE <tornado186@...> wrote:

          From: MARK HOENKE <tornado186@...>
          Subject: Re: [campernicholson] Inner Forestay
          To: campernicholson@yahoogroups.com
          Received: Friday, June 24, 2011, 3:00 AM

           

          Our Camper 58 is cutter rigged ketch.  The inner stay is from the upper spreader parallel to the forestay so it lands about 8 feet aft of the stem fitting.  There are running backs to port and starboard winches at the cockpit.  The inner stay is a roller furling ProFurl Clasic 42.  The inner jib is then a 2/3 hoist that fills the space to the mast. Below deck is a SS rod & turnbuckle to the keel to buck up the deck fitting.  The Genoa is unmanageable except to furl.  I am considering adding a solent rig or code zero or both to the aft end of the stem fitting to be operated with a spare jib halyard.  This will let us run a large drifter/reacher or a storm jib.

        • Brian Stannard
          A babystay is usually fitted in lieu of forward lowers. It is not a stay a sail is set on. ... -- Brian Living aboard in Victoria
          Message 5 of 18 , Jun 28, 2011
            A babystay is usually fitted in lieu of forward lowers. It is not a stay a sail is set on. 

            On Mon, Jun 27, 2011 at 11:52 PM, Gary Noble <noble.gary@...> wrote:
             

            Hi Mark
            The inner forestay conversation is very interesting. On the CN 30 due to its racing genesis is just a stay positioned to allow the the mast to be bent by adjusting the back stay and the shape the somewhat tiny main.On the CN35s with the taller rigs one can see the stay would have other uses but not sure as I have only sailed on a 35 with the regular mast height.
            Gary S?V Whakarra.

            --- On Fri, 6/24/11, MARK HOENKE <tornado186@...> wrote:

            From: MARK HOENKE <tornado186@...>
            Subject: Re: [campernicholson] Inner Forestay
            To: campernicholson@yahoogroups.com
            Received: Friday, June 24, 2011, 3:00 AM

             

            Our Camper 58 is cutter rigged ketch.  The inner stay is from the upper spreader parallel to the forestay so it lands about 8 feet aft of the stem fitting.  There are running backs to port and starboard winches at the cockpit.  The inner stay is a roller furling ProFurl Clasic 42.  The inner jib is then a 2/3 hoist that fills the space to the mast. Below deck is a SS rod & turnbuckle to the keel to buck up the deck fitting.  The Genoa is unmanageable except to furl.  I am considering adding a solent rig or code zero or both to the aft end of the stem fitting to be operated with a spare jib halyard.  This will let us run a large drifter/reacher or a storm jib.




            --
            Brian
            Living aboard in Victoria
          • Gary Noble
            Brian thanks for the feedback. Yes I had forgotten that detail. All the best Gary ... From: Brian Stannard Subject: Re:
            Message 6 of 18 , Jun 28, 2011
              Brian thanks for the feedback. Yes I had forgotten that detail. All the best Gary

              --- On Tue, 6/28/11, Brian Stannard <brianstannard@...> wrote:

              From: Brian Stannard <brianstannard@...>
              Subject: Re: [campernicholson] Inner Forestay
              To: campernicholson@yahoogroups.com
              Received: Tuesday, June 28, 2011, 2:33 PM

               
              A babystay is usually fitted in lieu of forward lowers. It is not a stay a sail is set on. 

              On Mon, Jun 27, 2011 at 11:52 PM, Gary Noble <noble.gary@...> wrote:
               
              Hi Mark
              The inner forestay conversation is very interesting. On the CN 30 due to its racing genesis is just a stay positioned to allow the the mast to be bent by adjusting the back stay and the shape the somewhat tiny main.On the CN35s with the taller rigs one can see the stay would have other uses but not sure as I have only sailed on a 35 with the regular mast height.
              Gary S?V Whakarra.

              --- On Fri, 6/24/11, MARK HOENKE <tornado186@...> wrote:

              From: MARK HOENKE <tornado186@...>
              Subject: Re: [campernicholson] Inner Forestay
              To: campernicholson@yahoogroups.com
              Received: Friday, June 24, 2011, 3:00 AM

               
              Our Camper 58 is cutter rigged ketch.  The inner stay is from the upper spreader parallel to the forestay so it lands about 8 feet aft of the stem fitting.  There are running backs to port and starboard winches at the cockpit.  The inner stay is a roller furling ProFurl Clasic 42.  The inner jib is then a 2/3 hoist that fills the space to the mast. Below deck is a SS rod & turnbuckle to the keel to buck up the deck fitting.  The Genoa is unmanageable except to furl.  I am considering adding a solent rig or code zero or both to the aft end of the stem fitting to be operated with a spare jib halyard.  This will let us run a large drifter/reacher or a storm jib.



              --
              Brian
              Living aboard in Victoria
            • MarkH
              Gary, We have both upper and lower spreaders. Our storm jib is set on the stay to the upper spreaders as I described. There is also a lower inside stay from
              Message 7 of 18 , Jun 28, 2011
                Gary,
                We have both upper and lower spreaders. Our storm jib is set on the stay to the upper spreaders as I described. There is also a lower inside stay from the lower spreaders to the deck. No sail here. This is a nice rig with lots of options. Both roller furlers have double tracks but that is sort of pointless without crew to change sails. The other thing about that is the jib weighs 140 kilo so it stays where it is. The only fault I can find is tacking the 135 (or any) genoa is not easy. The genoa is Yankee cut with very high clew and the thing hangs up on the cutter stay every time. In moderate winds I gybe so the wind can carry the clew forward. A solent rig would solve this for a boat that did not need the inside (cutter)) stay.
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.