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Re: [campernicholson] Windows

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  • Albert Boyce
    If breaking in to thousand little pieces is a characteristic of tempered glass, then that was what was originally in my 35, #132. I took the glass out to rebed
    Message 1 of 26 , Feb 5, 2009
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      If breaking in to thousand little pieces is a characteristic of tempered glass, then that was what was originally in my 35, #132. I took the glass out to rebed and dropped it  It disintegrated.  Anyway, replaced them all with lexan which has held up well over the last five years with no scratches or other imperfections. Bedded them with a GE product recommended by the platics shop andcthere have been no leaks. 

      Sent from my iPhone

      On Feb 5, 2009, at 7:07 AM, jose pacheco zuloaga <e9a41@...> wrote:

      Hi guys,
      there are  glasses that are used in windshields that are made of two glasses bonded together by some sort of glue, those are the best, in my opinion.
      Jose




      To: campernicholson@ yahoogroups. com
      From: blueprintbill@ comcast.net
      Date: Wed, 4 Feb 2009 22:40:56 -0500
      Subject: Re: [campernicholson] Windows


      John,
      I would doubt very much that portlights are of tempered glass. Temperd glass while being very strong is subject to unpredictable failure after an injury that could go undetected for any length of time. A small nick or scratch in the surface could result in the sort of failure typical for tempered glass,  when the glass goes white instantaneously and then falls out ( or in ) in the form of a pile of thousands of relatively equal small sized shards leaving the frame completely empty and open. This is just fine in residential or commercial doorways etc. but not what one should be looking for on a boat. These failures are the result of stresses placed on the glass from a fresh impact, or something as simple as sunshine on previously injured glass causing a heating condition and resulting expansion that stresses material differentially resulting in failure. Look instead for a heavy duty laminated glass that will stay in place when broken.
      Bill Roesner
      SV Blueprint
      CN 31-113

      On Feb 3, 2009, at 3:43 PM, JOHN LARSON wrote:


      Simon
       
      Our 35, Number 85 has glass fixed ports.  Not sure if they are tempered or laminated glass, but they all original and are perfectly clear and unscratched after 36 years, not something you can say for any kind of plastic I know of. 
       
      John
      Passport, CN 35-85





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    • JOHN LARSON
      Hi Bill Actually, I think they are tempered. It seems there s a little symbol on them and it says something about tempered glass. Tempered glass is really
      Message 2 of 26 , Feb 5, 2009
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        Hi Bill
         
        Actually, I think they are tempered.  It seems there's a little symbol on them and it says something about tempered glass.  Tempered glass is really strong unless hit on the edge, which I'm sure you already knew.  I suppose C & N thought that the edge was well enough protected not to be a problem.
         
        When we get to Maine next summer, I'll check.
         
        John
        Passport, CN 35 #85
      • William E. Roesner
        John, I m surprised C & N would have used tempered glass. It s not just the edge that s vulnerable, it can also be a surface injury. There is a visual
        Message 3 of 26 , Feb 5, 2009
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          John,
          I'm surprised C & N would have used tempered glass. It's not just the edge that's vulnerable, it can also be a surface injury. There is a visual identifier of tempered at least in larger pieces, and that is the 'tong' marks on at least one edge, where tongs are stuck into the glass in the oven while it is still semi molten, to pull it out of the fire. You will see little dents in the surface 6" to a foot a part. 
          One other characteristic of the material is that it cannot be cut or ground after tempering,... it will shatter.  Each piece is custom sized and cut before being put in the oven. This accounts for the higher cost of the product.
          See you down east.
          Cheers,
          Bill
          CN31-113
          Blueprint

          On Feb 5, 2009, at 4:53 PM, JOHN LARSON wrote:


          Hi Bill
           
          Actually, I think they are tempered.  It seems there's a little symbol on them and it says something about tempered glass.  Tempered glass is really strong unless hit on the edge, which I'm sure you already knew.  I suppose C & N thought that the edge was well enough protected not to be a problem.
           
          When we get to Maine next summer, I'll check.
           
          John
          Passport, CN 35 #85


        • JOHN LARSON
          Bill I don t remember seeing tong marks, but it s been a lot of years since we rebedded the portlights. Hope to see you when we get back to Maine also. We re
          Message 4 of 26 , Feb 8, 2009
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            Bill
             
            I don't remember seeing tong marks, but it's been a lot of years since we rebedded the portlights. 
             
            Hope to see you when we get back to Maine also.  We're still trying to decide what to do next summer.  Either we'll take Passport south slowly, checking out all the sites and store her somewhere south of cape Cod or we'll move a bit faster and take a bit more time and get back to the Chesapeake.
             
            We'll keep you informed of when we decide to leave for Maine.
             
            John
            s/v Passport
             
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