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RE: [campernicholson] Re: Cabin side ports

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  • Vitalius, Bob
    Charles, Thanks for your advice. I am not sure our extrusions work the same way but I will certainly check it out armed with your advice. In the case of the
    Message 1 of 17 , Nov 28, 2007
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      Charles,

      Thanks for your advice. I am not sure our extrusions work the same way but I will certainly check it out armed with your advice.  In the case of the Nic 31 the Lexan is held into the exterior extrusion only. The interior extrusion’s purpose is to hold the exterior extrusion by sandwiching it to the hull. The Lexan is pressed and held in the exterior extrusion by this heavy rubber gasket that (at least the one I took out) is shaped to fit into the cavities created by the extrusion. Brewers just called me this afternoon to say they are shipping the new gaskets tomorrow so we will see if they are in fact the same thing. I just picked up the new lexan cut to shape today. The total cost including them cutting to the exact shape of the old ones was $40 per ($80). I will post progress (or ask for ideas).

      Thanks

      Bob Vitalius

      Blythe Spirit  

       

      Bob Vitalius

      VP Business Development

       

                          

       

      Dirigo Telecommunications, Inc.

      75 Pearl St. Ste 470

      Portland, ME 04101-4101

       

      207 221 6205 Direct 

      207-838-0004 Cell         

      207 221 6200 Main Office

      877 870 1234 Toll Free

       

      www.dirigotelecom.com 

       

      Make Contact. Better.

       

      This e-mail is intended solely for the person(s) or entity(ies) to which it is addressed and may contain confidential or privileged material. Any duplication, dissemination, action taken in reliance upon, or other use of this information by persons or entities other than the intended recipient is prohibited and may violate applicable law. If this e-mail has been received in error, please notify the sender and delete the information from your system.

       

       

       


      From: campernicholson@yahoogroups.com [mailto:campernicholson@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of solon_mhor
      Sent: Wednesday, November 28, 2007 2:38 PM
      To: campernicholson@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [campernicholson] Re: Cabin side ports

       

      I have a CN 30 (hull #23, launched 1973) and did the same project
      this past summer on the side lights. The aluminum extrusion has a
      flange that is attached by self tapping screws (as you know)to the
      outside of the cabin, and a channel that holds the plexiglass. The
      two halves of the frame are held together by two screws at each end
      that are screwed thru the outside of the channel into a short
      connector that links and holds the two halves together. If you can
      make the end accessible to a drill press, it is relatively easy to
      drill out the screws that hold the two ends together. Otherwise, the
      drill bit walks. In my case, one of my friends has a machine shop at
      home and drilled out the screws. I cut aluminum sheet (1/8 inch thick
      by 1-1/2 long) for the new connectors. the channels will accomodate
      3/16 inch to 1/4 inch thick plex, which was cut, using the old window
      as a template, on a bandsaw. I didn't use lexan because of the cost
      and I couldn't obtain it in a thickness of less than 1/2 inch. I
      threw away the old gasket which was ruined and leaking and cleaned
      out the channels; then used a product called "3-M strip caulk" as the
      new gasket. This product comes in 18 inch snake-like strips and can
      be easily rolled up and fitted into place. I just simply pressed the
      plexiglass into the channel/strip caulk and made sure that there were
      no gaps. Strip caulk cleans up easily with paint thinner. Painted
      the aluminum frame with enamel and bedded the window with 101
      polysulfide.
      Good luck with the project.
      Charles Yost
      Solon Mhor

      --- In campernicholson@ yahoogroups. com, "bvitalius"
      <bob.vitalius@ ...> wrote:

      >
      > I have a Nic 31 and have just pulled the side cabin ports out to
      > replace the "glass" (lexan). These are the long 5' non opening
      ones
      in
      > the main cabin. I don't know whether they are similar from one Nic
      > model to another but they kind of look the same (at least from a
      > distance) as on the the 35 and 39. I have ordered new gaskets and
      new
      > lexan. Has anyone else had experience with this project. The
      outside
      > frame (aluminum extrusion) was screwed into the inside frame with
      self
      > tapping screws. The pointed ends of the screws were apparently cut
      off
      > to accomdate the vinyl interior trim. In the process they bunged up
      > many of the holes so self tapping screws may not be the replacement
      > answer. I am considering dilling out the interior frame and
      replacing
      > the self tapping screws with bolts and nuts. I think that means the
      > interior vinyl molding will no longer fit (over the nuts).
      > Thoughts?
      > Additionally, has anyone had experience with replacing the gasket
      that
      > holds the "glass" in the frame. When I pulled the old gasket out
      I
      > realized my fears that it was going to be a b...h to get the new
      one
      > in, fit and seated properly. Any intructions to offer? Is there
      some
      > kind of tool to get the gasket in? Any ideas appreciated.
      > Bob V. Blythe Spirit
      >

    • rogerlud
      Bob I replaced all four port seals in 2002. I hsve pictures of the rubber seal in Photos under Gebo Port Gasket . Getting the rubber gasket in was no easy
      Message 2 of 17 , Dec 1, 2007
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        Bob

        I replaced all four port seals in 2002. I hsve pictures of the
        rubber seal in Photos under 'Gebo Port Gasket'. Getting the rubber
        gasket in was no easy thing, I worked the gasket in by pressing it
        in using soapy water in squit bottle for lubricant and used a
        tablespoon to smooth it in place as I went along.

        What are you using between the glass and aluminum frame?
        I tried a silcone sealant but after 2 attempts couldn't get a water
        tight seal, so on third try I used a ribbon sealant I got from a
        local auto windshield shop. It worked great still no leaks. I got
        the smallest diameter he had and stretch it out thinner, excess will
        squeese out on the outside glass, which is a pain to clean up. Note
        no leaks in 5+ years.

        Your screws for the frame must be longer than mine, but the holes
        that looked too large I used a little epoxy or polester resin.

        It's a lot easier when done by two people.

        Hope this helps!

        Roger

        Pagan Knight N31/107


        --- In campernicholson@yahoogroups.com, "bvitalius"
        <bob.vitalius@...> wrote:
        >
        > I have a Nic 31 and have just pulled the side cabin ports out to
        > replace the "glass" (lexan). These are the long 5' non opening ones
        in
        > the main cabin. I don't know whether they are similar from one Nic
        > model to another but they kind of look the same (at least from a
        > distance) as on the the 35 and 39. I have ordered new gaskets and
        new
        > lexan. Has anyone else had experience with this project. The
        outside
        > frame (aluminum extrusion) was screwed into the inside frame with
        self
        > tapping screws. The pointed ends of the screws were apparently cut
        off
        > to accomdate the vinyl interior trim. In the process they bunged up
        > many of the holes so self tapping screws may not be the replacement
        > answer. I am considering dilling out the interior frame and
        replacing
        > the self tapping screws with bolts and nuts. I think that means the
        > interior vinyl molding will no longer fit (over the nuts).
        > Thoughts?
        > Additionally, has anyone had experience with replacing the gasket
        that
        > holds the "glass" in the frame. When I pulled the old gasket out I
        > realized my fears that it was going to be a b...h to get the new
        one
        > in, fit and seated properly. Any intructions to offer? Is there
        some
        > kind of tool to get the gasket in? Any ideas appreciated.
        > Bob V. Blythe Spirit
        >
      • bvitalius
        Roger, I am back to the replacement of the fixed side ports project. Brewers ( Gebo s retail distributor) sent me the wrong gaskets. I had pictures you had
        Message 3 of 17 , Mar 17, 2008
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          Roger, I am back to the replacement of the fixed side ports project.
          Brewers ( Gebo's retail distributor) sent me the wrong gaskets. I had
          pictures you had provided of the "right' gaskets but have changed
          computers and can not locate them. Would you mind resending them or
          reminding me how to access them?
          Thank you,
          Bob
          Blythe Spirit
          --- In campernicholson@yahoogroups.com, "rogerlud" <pknight107@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Bob
          >
          > I replaced all four port seals in 2002. I hsve pictures of the
          > rubber seal in Photos under 'Gebo Port Gasket'. Getting the rubber
          > gasket in was no easy thing, I worked the gasket in by pressing it
          > in using soapy water in squit bottle for lubricant and used a
          > tablespoon to smooth it in place as I went along.
          >
          > What are you using between the glass and aluminum frame?
          > I tried a silcone sealant but after 2 attempts couldn't get a water
          > tight seal, so on third try I used a ribbon sealant I got from a
          > local auto windshield shop. It worked great still no leaks. I got
          > the smallest diameter he had and stretch it out thinner, excess
          will
          > squeese out on the outside glass, which is a pain to clean up.
          Note
          > no leaks in 5+ years.
          >
          > Your screws for the frame must be longer than mine, but the holes
          > that looked too large I used a little epoxy or polester resin.
          >
          > It's a lot easier when done by two people.
          >
          > Hope this helps!
          >
          > Roger
          >
          > Pagan Knight N31/107
          >
          >
          > --- In campernicholson@yahoogroups.com, "bvitalius"
          > <bob.vitalius@> wrote:
          > >
          > > I have a Nic 31 and have just pulled the side cabin ports out to
          > > replace the "glass" (lexan). These are the long 5' non opening
          ones
          > in
          > > the main cabin. I don't know whether they are similar from one
          Nic
          > > model to another but they kind of look the same (at least from a
          > > distance) as on the the 35 and 39. I have ordered new gaskets and
          > new
          > > lexan. Has anyone else had experience with this project. The
          > outside
          > > frame (aluminum extrusion) was screwed into the inside frame with
          > self
          > > tapping screws. The pointed ends of the screws were apparently
          cut
          > off
          > > to accomdate the vinyl interior trim. In the process they bunged
          up
          > > many of the holes so self tapping screws may not be the
          replacement
          > > answer. I am considering dilling out the interior frame and
          > replacing
          > > the self tapping screws with bolts and nuts. I think that means
          the
          > > interior vinyl molding will no longer fit (over the nuts).
          > > Thoughts?
          > > Additionally, has anyone had experience with replacing the gasket
          > that
          > > holds the "glass" in the frame. When I pulled the old gasket out
          I
          > > realized my fears that it was going to be a b...h to get the new
          > one
          > > in, fit and seated properly. Any intructions to offer? Is there
          > some
          > > kind of tool to get the gasket in? Any ideas appreciated.
          > > Bob V. Blythe Spirit
          > >
          >
        • mcverlaque
          We are in the process of replacing the glass in our side ports, too, and found the gasket pictured under Gebo Port Gasket looks almost identical to the one
          Message 4 of 17 , Mar 28, 2008
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            We are in the process of replacing the "glass" in our side ports, too,
            and found the gasket pictured under "Gebo Port Gasket" looks almost
            identical to the one we have removed. Does anyone know where the Gebo
            Gasket can be acquired and is there a part number?

            Thanks
            Mary & Christian / S/V I Wanda a Nicholson 40 pilothouse sloop
          • Vitalius, Bob
            Mary & Christian I am replacing the stationary reports on Blythe Spirit, my Nic 31. I don t know whether they are the same with the same gaskets you may need.
            Message 5 of 17 , Mar 28, 2008
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              Mary & Christian

              I am replacing the stationary reports on Blythe Spirit, my Nic 31. I don’t know whether they are the same with the same gaskets you may need. The Gebo retail representative in US is:

              Brewers Pilots Point Maina

              Westbrook, Conn.

              860-399-7906

              The person I am working with in the parts dept. is John Werner.  jwerner@...

              They get the gaskets from Wabesto.

              John is working on getting me the correct gasket right now. ( they had sent me the wrong one) I went over the photo’s with him as we both viewed them on the computer while on a phone call. We decided that it would be best to actually send him a sample of the old gasket I have removed. He received them Weds. and when I talked to him yesterday he was working with Wabasto to identify exactly the right one. I told him once we solved it I would post the part # on this site and he should mark his files so as other CN owners call he will have a good handle on it.

              I will keep you posted.

              Bob

              Blythe Spirit -Nic 31

               

              From: campernicholson@yahoogroups.com [mailto:campernicholson@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of mcverlaque
              Sent: Friday, March 28, 2008 9:50 AM
              To: campernicholson@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [campernicholson] Re: Cabin side ports

               

              We are in the process of replacing the "glass" in our side ports, too,
              and found the gasket pictured under "Gebo Port Gasket" looks almost
              identical to the one we have removed. Does anyone know where the Gebo
              Gasket can be acquired and is there a part number?

              Thanks
              Mary & Christian / S/V I Wanda a Nicholson 40 pilothouse sloop

            • William E. Roesner
              Bob, I m following your ordeal re port light gasketing with great interest and much sympathy. I hope you document it well as I ll be one of your next
              Message 6 of 17 , Mar 29, 2008
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                Bob,
                I'm following your ordeal re port light gasketing with great interest
                and much sympathy. I hope you document it well as I'll be one of your
                next customers.
                Cheers to you and Mary and Christian,
                Bill R.
                SV Blueprint
                CN31-113

                On Mar 28, 2008, at 6:29 PM, Vitalius, Bob wrote:

                > Mary & Christian
                >
                > I am replacing the stationary reports on Blythe Spirit, my Nic 31. I
                > don’t know whether they are the same with the same gaskets you may
                > need. The Gebo retail representative in US is:
                >
                > Brewers Pilots Point Maina
                >
                > Westbrook, Conn.
                >
                > 860-399-7906
                >
                > The person I am working with in the parts dept. is John Werner. 
                > jwerner@...
                >
                > They get the gaskets from Wabesto.
                >
                > John is working on getting me the correct gasket right now. ( they had
                > sent me the wrong one) I went over the photo’s with him as we both
                > viewed them on the computer while on a phone call. We decided that it
                > would be best to actually send him a sample of the old gasket I have
                > removed. He received them Weds. and when I talked to him yesterday he
                > was working with Wabasto to identify exactly the right one. I told him
                > once we solved it I would post the part # on this site and he should
                > mark his files so as other CN owners call he will have a good handle
                > on it.
                >
                > I will keep you posted.
                >
                > Bob
                >
                > Blythe Spirit -Nic 31
                >
                >  
                >
                > From: campernicholson@yahoogroups.com
                > [mailto:campernicholson@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of mcverlaque
                > Sent: Friday, March 28, 2008 9:50 AM
                > To: campernicholson@yahoogroups.com
                > Subject: [campernicholson] Re: Cabin side ports
                >
                >  
                >
                > We are in the process of replacing the "glass" in our side ports, too,
                > and found the gasket pictured under "Gebo Port Gasket" looks almost
                > identical to the one we have removed. Does anyone know where the Gebo
                > Gasket can be acquired and is there a part number?
                >
                > Thanks
                > Mary & Christian / S/V I Wanda a Nicholson 40 pilothouse sloop
                >
                >
                >
                >
              • iona350
                Mary and Christian and the group, Jack and I had problems with the port lights, or side lights or whateven you call them--the tempered glass side windows on
                Message 7 of 17 , Mar 30, 2008
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                  Mary and Christian and the group,

                  Jack and I had problems with the port lights, or side lights or
                  whateven you call them--the tempered glass side windows on IONA. The
                  gaskets were shot!! They didn't leak on a light rainy day, but with
                  waves crashing about, or a hard driving rain, they leaked badly. We
                  were in a quandry as to how to fix them when we discovered "coax
                  seal". Actually we were in Bermuda when the problem first appeared
                  and we had to do something in a hurry or forever be wet everytime we
                  used the head, and coax seal was the only thing that remotely seemed
                  suitable. So it was in desperation that we first fixed the head
                  window with this stuff. Once we saw how well it worked we brought
                  lots back in our luggage and did all the rest of the windows. What
                  do they dsy about necessity being the mother on invention? I am sure
                  the inventors never dreamed of the many uses this tape would see.

                  On our CN 35, as on all, I think, there is a moulded recess where the
                  gasket fits, then the tempered glass window, then a crome frame that
                  holds everything in place, fitted into a moulded flange screwed in
                  place. We took all this apart, one window at a time. We cleaned out
                  the old gasket--much of which fell in dried-out and crumbled pieces
                  into our hands( no wonder the windows leaked!). We cleaned off the
                  recess with solvents etc so that it was really clean. Then we
                  placed the sticky coax seal into the gasket recess. We carefully
                  reset the window and chrome frame; bedded all the frame screws with
                  good bedding compound and voila! no more leaks.

                  The coax seal is cheap and easy to buy at almost any hardware, or TV
                  place, etc, but Radio Shack has it in abundance. It is a pliable,
                  sticky, black, rubbery type stuff that is about 1/2 inch wide and
                  comes in a roll with wax paper separation in the roll because it
                  sticks to itself and almost anything else. It is used in VHF marine
                  radio applications where the coax fitting attaches to the antenna.
                  It keeps out water and salt, etc from messing up the connections.
                  We have found lots of other uses for the stuff on the boat aside from
                  its obvious and intended use.

                  We realize that this is not a permanent fix (but then neither was the
                  original stuff. But so far--crossed fingers--the stuff is still
                  pliable and keeping out the water. We keep rolls of this aboard and
                  found this to be a cheap and easy fix that really works.

                  I am not sure that the windows on your CN 40 are the same, but, hey,
                  its worth a try--the worst that can happen is that it doesn't work,
                  and you will have little invested except a bit of time. But I think
                  you might be surprised.

                  Sincerely, Crissie Staats -- IONA -- CN 35 # 135
                • JIM TEIPEN
                  We discovered some leakage of the side ports during our return from Hawaii to California in the summer of 2005. It wasn t exactly a river but just enough to
                  Message 8 of 17 , Mar 30, 2008
                  • 0 Attachment
                    We discovered some leakage of the side ports during our return from Hawaii to California in the summer of 2005.  It wasn't exactly a river but just enough to drive us crazy when trying to use the main salon bunks.  Over the following winter, we resealed all of the ports using clear silicone sealant.  It looks great and no more leakage problems so far.  We also replaced both of the deck hatches and completely disassembled and resealed all parts of the main hatch.  A lot of work but a dry boat is nice to have!

                    Jim
                    Alegria
                    CN 35 - 68




                    To: campernicholson@yahoogroups.com
                    From: chivaree@...
                    Date: Mon, 31 Mar 2008 01:04:16 +0000
                    Subject: [campernicholson] Re: Cabin side ports

                    Mary and Christian and the group,

                    Jack and I had problems with the port lights, or side lights or
                    whateven you call them--the tempered glass side windows on IONA. The
                    gaskets were shot!! They didn't leak on a light rainy day, but with
                    waves crashing about, or a hard driving rain, they leaked badly. We
                    were in a quandry as to how to fix them when we discovered "coax
                    seal". Actually we were in Bermuda when the problem first appeared
                    and we had to do something in a hurry or forever be wet everytime we
                    used the head, and coax seal was the only thing that remotely seemed
                    suitable. So it was in desperation that we first fixed the head
                    window with this stuff. Once we saw how well it worked we brought
                    lots back in our luggage and did all the rest of the windows. What
                    do they dsy about necessity being the mother on invention? I am sure
                    the inventors never dreamed of the many uses this tape would see.

                    On our CN 35, as on all, I think, there is a moulded recess where the
                    gasket fits, then the tempered glass window, then a crome frame that
                    holds everything in place, fitted into a moulded flange screwed in
                    place. We took all this apart, one window at a time. We cleaned out
                    the old gasket--much of which fell in dried-out and crumbled pieces
                    into our hands( no wonder the windows leaked!). We cleaned off the
                    recess with solvents etc so that it was really clean. Then we
                    placed the sticky coax seal into the gasket recess. We carefully
                    reset the window and chrome frame; bedded all the frame screws with
                    good bedding compound and voila! no more leaks.

                    The coax seal is cheap and easy to buy at almost any hardware, or TV
                    place, etc, but Radio Shack has it in abundance. It is a pliable,
                    sticky, black, rubbery type stuff that is about 1/2 inch wide and
                    comes in a roll with wax paper separation in the roll because it
                    sticks to itself and almost anything else. It is used in VHF marine
                    radio applications where the coax fitting attaches to the antenna.
                    It keeps out water and salt, etc from messing up the connections.
                    We have found lots of other uses for the stuff on the boat aside from
                    its obvious and intended use.

                    We realize that this is not a permanent fix (but then neither was the
                    original stuff. But so far--crossed fingers--the stuff is still
                    pliable and keeping out the water. We keep rolls of this aboard and
                    found this to be a cheap and easy fix that really works.

                    I am not sure that the windows on your CN 40 are the same, but, hey,
                    its worth a try--the worst that can happen is that it doesn't work,
                    and you will have little invested except a bit of time. But I think
                    you might be surprised.

                    Sincerely, Crissie Staats -- IONA -- CN 35 # 135


                  • William E. Roesner
                    Coax may also be known as glazing tape available from commercial window fabricators / glass window shops. The port lights in the Nicholson 31 were
                    Message 9 of 17 , Mar 31, 2008
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                      'Coax' may also be known as 'glazing tape' available from commercial
                      window fabricators / glass window shops. The port lights in the
                      Nicholson 31 were originally installed using this material and it is an
                      extremely effective product.
                      Bill
                      SV Blueprint
                      CN31-113

                      On Mar 30, 2008, at 9:04 PM, iona350 wrote:

                      > Mary and Christian and the group,
                      >
                      > Jack and I had problems with the port lights, or side lights or
                      > whateven you call them--the tempered glass side windows on IONA. The
                      > gaskets were shot!! They didn't leak on a light rainy day, but with
                      > waves crashing about, or a hard driving rain, they leaked badly. We
                      > were in a quandry as to how to fix them when we discovered "coax
                      > seal". Actually we were in Bermuda when the problem first appeared
                      > and we had to do something in a hurry or forever be wet everytime we
                      > used the head, and coax seal was the only thing that remotely seemed
                      > suitable. So it was in desperation that we first fixed the head
                      > window with this stuff. Once we saw how well it worked we brought
                      > lots back in our luggage and did all the rest of the windows. What
                      > do they dsy about necessity being the mother on invention? I am sure
                      > the inventors never dreamed of the many uses this tape would see.
                      >
                      > On our CN 35, as on all, I think, there is a moulded recess where the
                      > gasket fits, then the tempered glass window, then a crome frame that
                      > holds everything in place, fitted into a moulded flange screwed in
                      > place. We took all this apart, one window at a time. We cleaned out
                      > the old gasket--much of which fell in dried-out and crumbled pieces
                      > into our hands( no wonder the windows leaked!). We cleaned off the
                      > recess with solvents etc so that it was really clean. Then we
                      > placed the sticky coax seal into the gasket recess. We carefully
                      > reset the window and chrome frame; bedded all the frame screws with
                      > good bedding compound and voila! no more leaks.
                      >
                      > The coax seal is cheap and easy to buy at almost any hardware, or TV
                      > place, etc, but Radio Shack has it in abundance. It is a pliable,
                      > sticky, black, rubbery type stuff that is about 1/2 inch wide and
                      > comes in a roll with wax paper separation in the roll because it
                      > sticks to itself and almost anything else. It is used in VHF marine
                      > radio applications where the coax fitting attaches to the antenna.
                      > It keeps out water and salt, etc from messing up the connections.
                      > We have found lots of other uses for the stuff on the boat aside from
                      > its obvious and intended use.
                      >
                      > We realize that this is not a permanent fix (but then neither was the
                      > original stuff. But so far--crossed fingers--the stuff is still
                      > pliable and keeping out the water. We keep rolls of this aboard and
                      > found this to be a cheap and easy fix that really works.
                      >
                      > I am not sure that the windows on your CN 40 are the same, but, hey,
                      > its worth a try--the worst that can happen is that it doesn't work,
                      > and you will have little invested except a bit of time. But I think
                      > you might be surprised.
                      >
                      > Sincerely, Crissie Staats -- IONA -- CN 35 # 135
                      >
                      >
                      >
                    • Denece Vincent
                      We put this stuff on in about 95-6 and its still good. What we got was called Sika tape. Denece ... From: iona350 To: campernicholson@yahoogroups.com Sent:
                      Message 10 of 17 , Mar 31, 2008
                      • 0 Attachment
                        We put this stuff on in about '95-6 and its still good. What we got was called Sika tape.
                         
                        Denece
                         
                         
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: iona350
                        Sent: 3/30/2008 9:04:20 PM
                        Subject: [campernicholson] Re: Cabin side ports

                        Mary and Christian and the group,

                        Jack and I had problems with the port lights, or side lights or
                        whateven you call them--the tempered glass side windows on IONA. The
                        gaskets were shot!! They didn't leak on a light rainy day, but with
                        waves crashing about, or a hard driving rain, they leaked badly. We
                        were in a quandry as to how to fix them when we discovered "coax
                        seal". Actually we were in Bermuda when the problem first appeared
                        and we had to do something in a hurry or forever be wet everytime we
                        used the head, and coax seal was the only thing that remotely seemed
                        suitable. So it was in desperation that we first fixed the head
                        window with this stuff. Once we saw how well it worked we brought
                        lots back in our luggage and did all the rest of the windows. What
                        do they dsy about necessity being the mother on invention? I am sure
                        the inventors never dreamed of the many uses this tape would see.

                        On our CN 35, as on all, I think, there is a moulded recess where the
                        gasket fits, then the tempered glass window, then a crome frame that
                        holds everything in place, fitted into a moulded flange screwed in
                        place. We took all this apart, one window at a time. We cleaned out
                        the old gasket--much of which fell in dried-out and crumbled pieces
                        into our hands( no wonder the windows leaked!). We cleaned off the
                        recess with solvents etc so that it was really clean. Then we
                        placed the sticky coax seal into the gasket recess. We carefully
                        reset the window and chrome frame; bedded all the frame screws with
                        good bedding compound and voila! no more leaks.

                        The coax seal is cheap and easy to buy at almost any hardware, or TV
                        place, etc, but Radio Shack has it in abundance. It is a pliable,
                        sticky, black, rubbery type stuff that is about 1/2 inch wide and
                        comes in a roll with wax paper separation in the roll because it
                        sticks to itself and almost anything else. It is used in VHF marine
                        radio applications where the coax fitting attaches to the antenna.
                        It keeps out water and salt, etc from messing up the connections.
                        We have found lots of other uses for the stuff on the boat aside from
                        its obvious and intended use.

                        We realize that this is not a permanent fix (but then neither was the
                        original stuff. But so far--crossed fingers--the stuff is still
                        pliable and keeping out the water. We keep rolls of this aboard and
                        found this to be a cheap and easy fix that really works.

                        I am not sure that the windows on your CN 40 are the same, but, hey,
                        its worth a try--the worst that can happen is that it doesn't work,
                        and you will have little invested except a bit of time. But I think
                        you might be surprised.

                        Sincerely, Crissie Staats -- IONA -- CN 35 # 135

                      • Thomas J. Stanton
                        ... From: Denece Vincent To: campernicholson@yahoogroups.com Sent: Monday, March 31, 2008 7:25 PM Subject: RE: [campernicholson] Re: Cabin side ports We put
                        Message 11 of 17 , Apr 1, 2008
                        • 0 Attachment
                           
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          Sent: Monday, March 31, 2008 7:25 PM
                          Subject: RE: [campernicholson] Re: Cabin side ports

                          We put this stuff on in about '95-6 and its still good. What we got was called Sika tape.
                           
                          Denece
                           
                           
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: iona350
                          Sent: 3/30/2008 9:04:20 PM
                          Subject: [campernicholson] Re: Cabin side ports

                          Mary and Christian and the group,

                          Jack and I had problems with the port lights, or side lights or
                          whateven you call them--the tempered glass side windows on IONA. The
                          gaskets were shot!! They didn't leak on a light rainy day, but with
                          waves crashing about, or a hard driving rain, they leaked badly. We
                          were in a quandry as to how to fix them when we discovered "coax
                          seal". Actually we were in Bermuda when the problem first appeared
                          and we had to do something in a hurry or forever be wet everytime we
                          used the head, and coax seal was the only thing that remotely seemed
                          suitable. So it was in desperation that we first fixed the head
                          window with this stuff. Once we saw how well it worked we brought
                          lots back in our luggage and did all the rest of the windows. What
                          do they dsy about necessity being the mother on invention? I am sure
                          the inventors never dreamed of the many uses this tape would see.

                          On our CN 35, as o! n all, I think, there is a moulded recess where the
                          gasket fits, then the tempered glass window, then a crome frame that
                          holds everything in place, fitted into a moulded flange screwed in
                          place. We took all this apart, one window at a time. We cleaned out
                          the old gasket--much of which fell in dried-out and crumbled pieces
                          into our hands( no wonder the windows leaked!). We cleaned off the
                          recess with solvents etc so that it was really clean. Then we
                          placed the sticky coax seal into the gasket recess. We carefully
                          reset the window and chrome frame; bedded all the frame screws with
                          good bedding compound and voila! no more leaks.

                          The coax seal is cheap and easy to buy at almost any hardware, or TV
                          place, etc, but Radio Shack has it in abundance. It is a pliable,
                          sticky, black, rubbery type stuff that is about 1/2 inch wide and
                          comes in a roll with wax paper separation in the roll because it
                          sticks to itself and almost ! anything else. It is used in VHF marine
                          radio applications where t he coax fitting attaches to the antenna.
                          It keeps out water and salt, etc from messing up the connections.
                          We have found lots of other uses for the stuff on the boat aside from
                          its obvious and intended use.

                          We realize that this is not a permanent fix (but then neither was the
                          original stuff. But so far--crossed fingers--the stuff is still
                          pliable and keeping out the water. We keep rolls of this aboard and
                          found this to be a cheap and easy fix that really works.

                          I am not sure that the windows on your CN 40 are the same, but, hey,
                          its worth a try--the worst that can happen is that it doesn't work,
                          and you will have little invested except a bit of time. But I think
                          you might be surprised.

                          Sincerely, Crissie Staats -- IONA -- CN 35 # 135

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