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RE: [campernicholson] Perkins 4-108

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  • Albert G. Boyce
    Katie/Simon One of the editors (I think his name is Nick Nicholson) of Practical Sailor built a boat and installed a Perkins 4-108 that had been sitting unused
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 20 8:58 AM
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      Katie/Simon       
       
      One of the editors (I think his name is Nick Nicholson) of Practical Sailor built a boat and installed a Perkins 4-108 that had been sitting unused for several years before the boat was finished.  He circumnavigated and wrote articles as he went that were published in Practical Sailor.  One of the problems he had with the 4-108 was oil leaking from the front and rear seals which he attributed to the seals hardening due to lack of use for such a long period.  I believe he ended up having the engine pulled in New Zealand or Australia to have the oil leaks repaired.
       
      Hope this is helpful.
       
      Al Boyce
      Discovery CN35 #132
      -----Original Message-----
      From: Katie and Simon [mailto:katieandsimon@...]
      Sent: Saturday, March 20, 2004 11:01 AM
      To: campernicholson@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [campernicholson] Perkins 4-108

      Hello CN team,

      All this talk about engines has got me thinking. Katie and I are planning to
      up sticks from Canada and head back to Gin Rummy in Turkey this summer. By
      the time we get to her, she'll have been sitting on the hard for almost 3
      years. Initially we plan to spend a few months living on board in Turkey
      while we refurbish her.

      I know there are lots of things to do, but my biggest concern is the engine.
      I've never left one untouched for so long before. About 6 months before we
      laid the boat up I fitted new injectors, replaced the fuel pump and had the
      high-pressure pump reconditioned with new seals. The engine was running fine
      when we left it, and I winterised it as usual, incuding pouring a bit of oil
      into the cylinders through the inlet manifold.

      When we go back I'm planning at the very least to do a top overhaul and
      replace the cylinder head gasket, etc.  But I'd also like to purchase
      beforehand any other spares that I'm likely to need - they're not always
      available in Turkey. Does anyone have any experience of restarting a
      long-stored engine, and what the condition is likely to be? Also, any tips
      for do's and don'ts before I get it started?!

      I'd appreciate your thoughts.

      Simon (& Katie)
      Gin Rummy, CN35-202

      _________________________________________________________________
      Stay in touch with absent friends - get MSN Messenger
      http://www.msn.co.uk/messenger

    • Katie and Simon
      Thank you Al. I ll look into it. Simon ... From: Albert G. Boyce Reply-To: campernicholson@yahoogroups.com To:
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 21 7:31 AM
      • 0 Attachment
        Thank you Al. I'll look into it.

        Simon


        ----Original Message Follows----
        From: "Albert G. Boyce" <Albert_Boyce@...>
        Reply-To: campernicholson@yahoogroups.com
        To: <campernicholson@yahoogroups.com>
        Subject: RE: [campernicholson] Perkins 4-108
        Date: Sat, 20 Mar 2004 11:58:28 -0500

        Katie/Simon

        One of the editors (I think his name is Nick Nicholson) of Practical Sailor
        built a boat and installed a Perkins 4-108 that had been sitting unused for
        several years before the boat was finished. He circumnavigated and wrote
        articles as he went that were published in Practical Sailor. One of the
        problems he had with the 4-108 was oil leaking from the front and rear seals
        which he attributed to the seals hardening due to lack of use for such a
        long period. I believe he ended up having the engine pulled in New Zealand
        or Australia to have the oil leaks repaired.

        Hope this is helpful.

        Al Boyce
        Discovery CN35 #132
        -----Original Message-----
        From: Katie and Simon [mailto:katieandsimon@...]
        Sent: Saturday, March 20, 2004 11:01 AM
        To: campernicholson@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [campernicholson] Perkins 4-108


        Hello CN team,

        All this talk about engines has got me thinking. Katie and I are planning
        to
        up sticks from Canada and head back to Gin Rummy in Turkey this summer.
        By
        the time we get to her, she'll have been sitting on the hard for almost 3
        years. Initially we plan to spend a few months living on board in Turkey
        while we refurbish her.

        I know there are lots of things to do, but my biggest concern is the
        engine.
        I've never left one untouched for so long before. About 6 months before
        we
        laid the boat up I fitted new injectors, replaced the fuel pump and had
        the
        high-pressure pump reconditioned with new seals. The engine was running
        fine
        when we left it, and I winterised it as usual, incuding pouring a bit of
        oil
        into the cylinders through the inlet manifold.

        When we go back I'm planning at the very least to do a top overhaul and
        replace the cylinder head gasket, etc. But I'd also like to purchase
        beforehand any other spares that I'm likely to need - they're not always
        available in Turkey. Does anyone have any experience of restarting a
        long-stored engine, and what the condition is likely to be? Also, any
        tips
        for do's and don'ts before I get it started?!

        I'd appreciate your thoughts.

        Simon (& Katie)
        Gin Rummy, CN35-202

        _________________________________________________________________
        Stay in touch with absent friends - get MSN Messenger
        http://www.msn.co.uk/messenger



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      • jmoorman@ozfilms.org
        Simon, The oil leaks Albert mentions can also be caused by overfilling the engine lube oil sump. If you are planning a top-end overhaul (although the old
        Message 3 of 9 , Mar 21 8:54 AM
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          Simon,

          The oil leaks Albert mentions can also be caused by
          overfilling the engine lube oil sump. If you are
          planning a top-end overhaul (although the old addage
          "if it ain't broke don't fix it" comes to mind) you
          will be able to turn the engine over by hand with a
          large wrench. If you opt to run it before that major
          bit of work, flush the fresh water cooling system,
          change the luricating oil, ALL of the filters, remove
          all of the injectors, pour an ounce of MARVEL MYSTERY
          OIL in each cylander and turn the engine either with
          the wrench (prefered) on the lower pulley or the
          starter. Once you are satisfied that everything is
          rotating smoothly, replace the injectors. Take a sample
          of the old diesel fuel out of the tank and look for
          suspended matter, you probably have a good growth of
          algae-even with a biocide...Best bet is to empty the
          tank and refill with fresh,treated diesel fuel.

          Before you attempt to start the engine, don't forget to
          bleed the entire sustem of the old fuel and any air.

          You will see smoke on start-up (Mystery Oil burn off)
          but she should settle down to her old self in a few
          seconds.

          Jeff
        • Simon Rayfield
          Hi Use the old saying - If it is not broken, why fix it! I know you have already had one list from Jeff, but here is mine anyway, some things obviously rely
          Message 4 of 9 , Mar 24 8:50 AM
          • 0 Attachment
            Hi
             
            Use the old saying - "If it is not broken, why fix it!" I know you have already had one list from Jeff, but here is mine anyway, some things obviously rely on commonsense and are repeated.  I am intrigued by the "Marvel Mystery Oil" this must be a US or Canadian product, this sort of thing is frowned upon in the UK for reasons of atmospheric polution (ie lots of smoke), we used to be able to get a very strong Redex upper cylinder lubricant additive that would "blow the engine's socks off"on start up!  As you are in Turkey, be aware that several UK Yacht Charter companies operate here (Marmaris, etc), these should have competent diesel engine mechanics as part of the crews and would have contact with UK for spares, etc.
             
            The Perkins engine is extremely reliable and robust.  The most important job is to change oil and filter regularly and keep the fuel and cooling systems in good health.  Since yours has been laid up for some time (but has had new injectors and a squirt of oil in the bores)  I would run through the following list:
             
            • Get the batteries topped up (if not sealed units) and fully charged up
            • Drain out the oil and change the filter.  Refill with supermarket brand (cheap) diesel engine oil, these engines are unsophisticated and cheap oil is fine provided it adheres to a standard diesel oil spec.  The expensive oil just contains more additives, etc.
            • Change fuel filter
            • Check fuel bowl for water, etc.  If the fuel tank wasn't left full up - check fuel tank lower drain cock for water (condensation), etc  if it isn't seized closed 
            • Fit fuel lift pump diaphragm kit or keep a spare onboard
            • Check the engine for signs of water leakage, particularly if it could have suffered freezing temperatures
            • Replace the rubber water pump impellor, check pump shaft seal as this can leak water into the bilge and whilst in the 'black hole' check the drive belts and possibly replace if there are signs of cracking when the belt is flexed 
            • Check alternator(s) are free to turn and terminals are not corroded 
            • Try and get a spanner on the end pulley (when checking the water pump) and turn the engine over by hand.  If you cannot turn it by hand with reasonable leverage I would start to worry - but I think this would be highly unlikely
            • Check water hoses and clips
            • I assume the boat is on the hard, so connect a freshwater hose to the seawater side and give it a good flush and check for leaks at the same time.
            • Flush freshwater side and header tank into bilge 
            • Check starter motor electrics for corrosion.  If they look green and horrid dismantle, clean terminals, apply vaseline and reconnect, similarly the battery and alternator terminals
            • If all of these items checks out OK - spin it over on the starter, watch for oil pressure even at cranking speed
            • Go for a start, warm it through thoroughly (give it a good run as these engines tend to run cool),  check for leaks, when satisfied, shutdown and change the oil again if it is very dirty. 
              Note: Unfortunately this will involve a prolonged run in neutral, but if you are on the hard you have no option.
            • Check the toilet and bilge pumps, as these have soft rubber diaphragms and valves  - a failed toilet pump is catastrophic!
            Tips from a local UK Perkins agent:
            • Don't waste money on new or spare injectors, they are very expensive and last for ever if taken out occasionally and serviced by a commercial vehicle injector agent.
            • When removing or refitting an injector, take precautions to prevent carbon, etc from falling into the cylinder.  If it does, use a screwdriver with a gob of grease on the end to get it out (piston on TDC) - don't trust unknown mechanics, etc., as these injectors ar messy to change and need care to get a good, longterm seal
            • Always fit a new copper ring to the injector body and preferably anneal (soften) the ring with heat before fitting in order to get a good seal.  Failure to clean the seat and get a gastight fit may result in combustion gas blowing past the seat and causing a carbon  build up in the recess and around the engine compartment.
            • If using a powerful decarbonizing cyclinder cleaner (Marvel Mystery Oil?) recheck the valve clearances (0.012" cold) as carbon removed from valve seats, etc may cause the clearances to change
            And finally - if you are worried about the cylinder head, etc., remove the injectors, buy or borrow a diesel engine compression tester and run a compression check (or watch an agent do it for you).  The cylinder compression values are a first rate check of the engine condition as they can be compared to the Perkins recommended pressure and more important they should all be equal or within a few psi of each other.  If these pressures are seriously different or low - you may need to strip the top end!! 
             
            When (or if)  you dismantle the fuel system take care to avoid air leaks and always replace the fuel filter at regular intervals.  I didn't, and a choppy sea stirred up the sediment in the fuel tank, this in turn settled in the filter and weeks later the engine speed became impossible to control.  The problem was a partially blocked fuel filter causing the governor/injector pump to 'stonewall' and draw in air from apparently secure connections resulting in an air-locked unstable governor, and hence hefty speed fluctuations!  This is also a cautionary tale for those of us (me included) that never look inside our fuel tanks. 
             
            Question:  Have you ever checked your fuel bowl after or when motoring through a rough sea - if it goes opaque or dark, you have a potential problem lurking in the fuel tank.  I always check my fuel bowl when tied up alongside (we all do it) and not surprisingly it is perfectly clear!  After all, who wants to poke around the engine room when the boat is standing on its end!
             
            In closing - my Perkins has been in the boat since new (72), has over 6600 hours on the clock and apart from routine maintenance is still going strong.....and there are probably other personal tips that others can add.  A lot of my engine experience has come the hard way whilst running the engine each day for 5 weeks whilst transitting the French canal system from Med to Channel.  Only major problem was the blocked fuel filter causing unstable engine speed, this seems totally bizarre but is a known problem with dirty fuel in a diesel.
             
            All the best
             
            Simon
            Dediou#42
             
            ps to Bob Barker if you read this epic and want to use any of it for the C&N Newsletter, please do.  I am currently recovering from local hospital day surgery (nose ream out) and have been told I must not play at boats for 48 hours.   I must add that a lot of the jobs above are still waiting for me to do, particularly opening up the fuel tank and getting in there - ugh!
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Saturday, March 20, 2004 4:00 PM
            Subject: [campernicholson] Perkins 4-108

            Hello CN team,

            All this talk about engines has got me thinking. Katie and I are planning to
            up sticks from Canada and head back to Gin Rummy in Turkey this summer. By
            the time we get to her, she'll have been sitting on the hard for almost 3
            years. Initially we plan to spend a few months living on board in Turkey
            while we refurbish her.

            I know there are lots of things to do, but my biggest concern is the engine.
            I've never left one untouched for so long before. About 6 months before we
            laid the boat up I fitted new injectors, replaced the fuel pump and had the
            high-pressure pump reconditioned with new seals. The engine was running fine
            when we left it, and I winterised it as usual, incuding pouring a bit of oil
            into the cylinders through the inlet manifold.

            When we go back I'm planning at the very least to do a top overhaul and
            replace the cylinder head gasket, etc.  But I'd also like to purchase
            beforehand any other spares that I'm likely to need - they're not always
            available in Turkey. Does anyone have any experience of restarting a
            long-stored engine, and what the condition is likely to be? Also, any tips
            for do's and don'ts before I get it started?!

            I'd appreciate your thoughts.

            Simon (& Katie)
            Gin Rummy, CN35-202

            _________________________________________________________________
            Stay in touch with absent friends - get MSN Messenger
            http://www.msn.co.uk/messenger

          • Katie and Simon
            Simon, This is great! Thank you so much for taking the time to prepare this epic. I will print it out and take it with me to Turkey. Much appreciated! Simon
            Message 5 of 9 , Mar 27 2:38 PM
            • 0 Attachment
              Simon,

              This is great! Thank you so much for taking the time to prepare this epic. I
              will print it out and take it with me to Turkey. Much appreciated!

              Simon
              Gin Rummy, CN35-202


              ----Original Message Follows----
              From: "Simon Rayfield" <srayfield@...>
              Reply-To: campernicholson@yahoogroups.com
              To: <campernicholson@yahoogroups.com>
              Subject: Re: [campernicholson] Perkins 4-108
              Date: Wed, 24 Mar 2004 16:50:32 -0000

              Hi

              Use the old saying - "If it is not broken, why fix it!" I know you have
              already had one list from Jeff, but here is mine anyway, some things
              obviously rely on commonsense and are repeated. I am intrigued by the
              "Marvel Mystery Oil" this must be a US or Canadian product, this sort of
              thing is frowned upon in the UK for reasons of atmospheric polution (ie lots
              of smoke), we used to be able to get a very strong Redex upper cylinder
              lubricant additive that would "blow the engine's socks off"on start up! As
              you are in Turkey, be aware that several UK Yacht Charter companies operate
              here (Marmaris, etc), these should have competent diesel engine mechanics as
              part of the crews and would have contact with UK for spares, etc.

              The Perkins engine is extremely reliable and robust. The most important job
              is to change oil and filter regularly and keep the fuel and cooling systems
              in good health. Since yours has been laid up for some time (but has had new
              injectors and a squirt of oil in the bores) I would run through the
              following list:

              a.. Get the batteries topped up (if not sealed units) and fully charged
              up
              b.. Drain out the oil and change the filter. Refill with supermarket
              brand (cheap) diesel engine oil, these engines are unsophisticated and cheap
              oil is fine provided it adheres to a standard diesel oil spec. The
              expensive oil just contains more additives, etc.
              c.. Change fuel filter
              d.. Check fuel bowl for water, etc. If the fuel tank wasn't left full up
              - check fuel tank lower drain cock for water (condensation), etc if it
              isn't seized closed
              e.. Fit fuel lift pump diaphragm kit or keep a spare onboard
              f.. Check the engine for signs of water leakage, particularly if it could
              have suffered freezing temperatures
              g.. Replace the rubber water pump impellor, check pump shaft seal as this
              can leak water into the bilge and whilst in the 'black hole' check the drive
              belts and possibly replace if there are signs of cracking when the belt is
              flexed
              h.. Check alternator(s) are free to turn and terminals are not corroded
              i.. Try and get a spanner on the end pulley (when checking the water
              pump) and turn the engine over by hand. If you cannot turn it by hand with
              reasonable leverage I would start to worry - but I think this would be
              highly unlikely
              j.. Check water hoses and clips
              k.. I assume the boat is on the hard, so connect a freshwater hose to the
              seawater side and give it a good flush and check for leaks at the same time.
              l.. Flush freshwater side and header tank into bilge
              m.. Check starter motor electrics for corrosion. If they look green and
              horrid dismantle, clean terminals, apply vaseline and reconnect, similarly
              the battery and alternator terminals
              n.. If all of these items checks out OK - spin it over on the starter,
              watch for oil pressure even at cranking speed
              o.. Go for a start, warm it through thoroughly (give it a good run as
              these engines tend to run cool), check for leaks, when satisfied, shutdown
              and change the oil again if it is very dirty.
              Note: Unfortunately this will involve a prolonged run in neutral, but if
              you are on the hard you have no option.
              p.. Check the toilet and bilge pumps, as these have soft rubber
              diaphragms and valves - a failed toilet pump is catastrophic!
              Tips from a local UK Perkins agent:
              a.. Don't waste money on new or spare injectors, they are very expensive
              and last for ever if taken out occasionally and serviced by a commercial
              vehicle injector agent.
              b.. When removing or refitting an injector, take precautions to prevent
              carbon, etc from falling into the cylinder. If it does, use a screwdriver
              with a gob of grease on the end to get it out (piston on TDC) - don't trust
              unknown mechanics, etc., as these injectors ar messy to change and need care
              to get a good, longterm seal
              c.. Always fit a new copper ring to the injector body and preferably
              anneal (soften) the ring with heat before fitting in order to get a good
              seal. Failure to clean the seat and get a gastight fit may result in
              combustion gas blowing past the seat and causing a carbon build up in the
              recess and around the engine compartment.
              d.. If using a powerful decarbonizing cyclinder cleaner (Marvel Mystery
              Oil?) recheck the valve clearances (0.012" cold) as carbon removed from
              valve seats, etc may cause the clearances to change
              And finally - if you are worried about the cylinder head, etc., remove the
              injectors, buy or borrow a diesel engine compression tester and run a
              compression check (or watch an agent do it for you). The cylinder
              compression values are a first rate check of the engine condition as they
              can be compared to the Perkins recommended pressure and more important they
              should all be equal or within a few psi of each other. If these pressures
              are seriously different or low - you may need to strip the top end!!

              When (or if) you dismantle the fuel system take care to avoid air leaks and
              always replace the fuel filter at regular intervals. I didn't, and a choppy
              sea stirred up the sediment in the fuel tank, this in turn settled in the
              filter and weeks later the engine speed became impossible to control. The
              problem was a partially blocked fuel filter causing the governor/injector
              pump to 'stonewall' and draw in air from apparently secure connections
              resulting in an air-locked unstable governor, and hence hefty speed
              fluctuations! This is also a cautionary tale for those of us (me included)
              that never look inside our fuel tanks.

              Question: Have you ever checked your fuel bowl after or when motoring
              through a rough sea - if it goes opaque or dark, you have a potential
              problem lurking in the fuel tank. I always check my fuel bowl when tied up
              alongside (we all do it) and not surprisingly it is perfectly clear! After
              all, who wants to poke around the engine room when the boat is standing on
              its end!

              In closing - my Perkins has been in the boat since new (72), has over 6600
              hours on the clock and apart from routine maintenance is still going
              strong.....and there are probably other personal tips that others can add.
              A lot of my engine experience has come the hard way whilst running the
              engine each day for 5 weeks whilst transitting the French canal system from
              Med to Channel. Only major problem was the blocked fuel filter causing
              unstable engine speed, this seems totally bizarre but is a known problem
              with dirty fuel in a diesel.

              All the best

              Simon
              Dediou#42

              ps to Bob Barker if you read this epic and want to use any of it for the C&N
              Newsletter, please do. I am currently recovering from local hospital day
              surgery (nose ream out) and have been told I must not play at boats for 48
              hours. I must add that a lot of the jobs above are still waiting for me to
              do, particularly opening up the fuel tank and getting in there - ugh!
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Katie and Simon
              To: campernicholson@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Saturday, March 20, 2004 4:00 PM
              Subject: [campernicholson] Perkins 4-108


              Hello CN team,

              All this talk about engines has got me thinking. Katie and I are planning
              to
              up sticks from Canada and head back to Gin Rummy in Turkey this summer.
              By
              the time we get to her, she'll have been sitting on the hard for almost 3
              years. Initially we plan to spend a few months living on board in Turkey
              while we refurbish her.

              I know there are lots of things to do, but my biggest concern is the
              engine.
              I've never left one untouched for so long before. About 6 months before
              we
              laid the boat up I fitted new injectors, replaced the fuel pump and had
              the
              high-pressure pump reconditioned with new seals. The engine was running
              fine
              when we left it, and I winterised it as usual, incuding pouring a bit of
              oil
              into the cylinders through the inlet manifold.

              When we go back I'm planning at the very least to do a top overhaul and
              replace the cylinder head gasket, etc. But I'd also like to purchase
              beforehand any other spares that I'm likely to need - they're not always
              available in Turkey. Does anyone have any experience of restarting a
              long-stored engine, and what the condition is likely to be? Also, any
              tips
              for do's and don'ts before I get it started?!

              I'd appreciate your thoughts.

              Simon (& Katie)
              Gin Rummy, CN35-202

              _________________________________________________________________
              Stay in touch with absent friends - get MSN Messenger
              http://www.msn.co.uk/messenger



              ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/campernicholson/

              b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              campernicholson-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

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            • jmoorman@ozfilms.org
              Simon, Marvel Mystery Oil is a light penetrating oil...Good for lubricating the piston rings, it will produce very little smoke. Your list is excellent! Jeff
              Message 6 of 9 , Mar 30 2:56 PM
              • 0 Attachment
                Simon,
                Marvel Mystery Oil is a light penetrating oil...Good
                for lubricating the piston rings, it will produce very
                little smoke.

                Your list is excellent!

                Jeff

                On Sat, 27 Mar 2004 22:38:01 +0000, "Katie and Simon"
                wrote:

                >
                > Simon,
                >
                > This is great! Thank you so much for taking the time
                to
                > prepare this epic. I
                > will print it out and take it with me to Turkey. Much
                > appreciated!
                >
                > Simon
                > Gin Rummy, CN35-202
                >
                >
                > ----Original Message Follows----
                > From: "Simon Rayfield" <srayfield@...>
                > Reply-To: campernicholson@yahoogroups.com
                > To: <campernicholson@yahoogroups.com>
                > Subject: Re: [campernicholson] Perkins 4-108
                > Date: Wed, 24 Mar 2004 16:50:32 -0000
                >
                > Hi
                >
                > Use the old saying - "If it is not broken, why fix
                it!"
                > I know you have
                > already had one list from Jeff, but here is mine
                > anyway, some things
                > obviously rely on commonsense and are repeated. I am
                > intrigued by the
                > "Marvel Mystery Oil" this must be a US or Canadian
                > product, this sort of
                > thing is frowned upon in the UK for reasons of
                > atmospheric polution (ie lots
                > of smoke), we used to be able to get a very strong
                > Redex upper cylinder
                > lubricant additive that would "blow the engine's socks
                > off"on start up! As
                > you are in Turkey, be aware that several UK Yacht
                > Charter companies operate
                > here (Marmaris, etc), these should have competent
                > diesel engine mechanics as
                > part of the crews and would have contact with UK for
                > spares, etc.
                >
                > The Perkins engine is extremely reliable and robust.
                > The most important job
                > is to change oil and filter regularly and keep the
                fuel
                > and cooling systems
                > in good health. Since yours has been laid up for some
                > time (but has had new
                > injectors and a squirt of oil in the bores) I would
                > run through the
                > following list:
                >
                > a.. Get the batteries topped up (if not sealed
                > units) and fully charged
                > up
                > b.. Drain out the oil and change the filter.
                Refill
                > with supermarket
                > brand (cheap) diesel engine oil, these engines are
                > unsophisticated and cheap
                > oil is fine provided it adheres to a standard diesel
                > oil spec. The
                > expensive oil just contains more additives, etc.
                > c.. Change fuel filter
                > d.. Check fuel bowl for water, etc. If the fuel
                > tank wasn't left full up
                > - check fuel tank lower drain cock for water
                > (condensation), etc if it
                > isn't seized closed
                > e.. Fit fuel lift pump diaphragm kit or keep a
                spare
                > onboard
                > f.. Check the engine for signs of water leakage,
                > particularly if it could
                > have suffered freezing temperatures
                > g.. Replace the rubber water pump impellor, check
                > pump shaft seal as this
                > can leak water into the bilge and whilst in the 'black
                > hole' check the drive
                > belts and possibly replace if there are signs of
                > cracking when the belt is
                > flexed
                > h.. Check alternator(s) are free to turn and
                > terminals are not corroded
                > i.. Try and get a spanner on the end pulley (when
                > checking the water
                > pump) and turn the engine over by hand. If you cannot
                > turn it by hand with
                > reasonable leverage I would start to worry - but I
                > think this would be
                > highly unlikely
                > j.. Check water hoses and clips
                > k.. I assume the boat is on the hard, so connect a
                > freshwater hose to the
                > seawater side and give it a good flush and check for
                > leaks at the same time.
                > l.. Flush freshwater side and header tank into
                bilge
                > m.. Check starter motor electrics for corrosion.
                If
                > they look green and
                > horrid dismantle, clean terminals, apply vaseline and
                > reconnect, similarly
                > the battery and alternator terminals
                > n.. If all of these items checks out OK - spin it
                > over on the starter,
                > watch for oil pressure even at cranking speed
                > o.. Go for a start, warm it through thoroughly
                (give
                > it a good run as
                > these engines tend to run cool), check for leaks,
                when
                > satisfied, shutdown
                > and change the oil again if it is very dirty.
                > Note: Unfortunately this will involve a prolonged
                > run in neutral, but if
                > you are on the hard you have no option.
                > p.. Check the toilet and bilge pumps, as these have
                > soft rubber
                > diaphragms and valves - a failed toilet pump is
                > catastrophic!
                > Tips from a local UK Perkins agent:
                > a.. Don't waste money on new or spare injectors,
                > they are very expensive
                > and last for ever if taken out occasionally and
                > serviced by a commercial
                > vehicle injector agent.
                > b.. When removing or refitting an injector, take
                > precautions to prevent
                > carbon, etc from falling into the cylinder. If it
                > does, use a screwdriver
                > with a gob of grease on the end to get it out (piston
                > on TDC) - don't trust
                > unknown mechanics, etc., as these injectors ar messy
                to
                > change and need care
                > to get a good, longterm seal
                > c.. Always fit a new copper ring to the injector
                > body and preferably
                > anneal (soften) the ring with heat before fitting in
                > order to get a good
                > seal. Failure to clean the seat and get a gastight
                fit
                > may result in
                > combustion gas blowing past the seat and causing a
                > carbon build up in the
                > recess and around the engine compartment.
                > d.. If using a powerful decarbonizing cyclinder
                > cleaner (Marvel Mystery
                > Oil?) recheck the valve clearances (0.012" cold) as
                > carbon removed from
                > valve seats, etc may cause the clearances to change
                > And finally - if you are worried about the cylinder
                > head, etc., remove the
                > injectors, buy or borrow a diesel engine compression
                > tester and run a
                > compression check (or watch an agent do it for you).
                > The cylinder
                > compression values are a first rate check of the
                engine
                > condition as they
                > can be compared to the Perkins recommended pressure
                and
                > more important they
                > should all be equal or within a few psi of each
                other.
                > If these pressures
                > are seriously different or low - you may need to strip
                > the top end!!
                >
                > When (or if) you dismantle the fuel system take care
                > to avoid air leaks and
                > always replace the fuel filter at regular intervals.
                I
                > didn't, and a choppy
                > sea stirred up the sediment in the fuel tank, this in
                > turn settled in the
                > filter and weeks later the engine speed became
                > impossible to control. The
                > problem was a partially blocked fuel filter causing
                the
                > governor/injector
                > pump to 'stonewall' and draw in air from apparently
                > secure connections
                > resulting in an air-locked unstable governor, and
                hence
                > hefty speed
                > fluctuations! This is also a cautionary tale for
                those
                > of us (me included)
                > that never look inside our fuel tanks.
                >
                > Question: Have you ever checked your fuel bowl after
                > or when motoring
                > through a rough sea - if it goes opaque or dark, you
                > have a potential
                > problem lurking in the fuel tank. I always check my
                > fuel bowl when tied up
                > alongside (we all do it) and not surprisingly it is
                > perfectly clear! After
                > all, who wants to poke around the engine room when the
                > boat is standing on
                > its end!
                >
                > In closing - my Perkins has been in the boat since new
                > (72), has over 6600
                > hours on the clock and apart from routine maintenance
                > is still going
                > strong.....and there are probably other personal tips
                > that others can add.
                > A lot of my engine experience has come the hard way
                > whilst running the
                > engine each day for 5 weeks whilst transitting the
                > French canal system from
                > Med to Channel. Only major problem was the blocked
                > fuel filter causing
                > unstable engine speed, this seems totally bizarre but
                > is a known problem
                > with dirty fuel in a diesel.
                >
                > All the best
                >
                > Simon
                > Dediou#42
                >
                > ps to Bob Barker if you read this epic and want to use
                > any of it for the C&N
                > Newsletter, please do. I am currently recovering from
                > local hospital day
                > surgery (nose ream out) and have been told I must not
                > play at boats for 48
                > hours. I must add that a lot of the jobs above are
                > still waiting for me to
                > do, particularly opening up the fuel tank and getting
                > in there - ugh!
                > ----- Original Message -----
                > From: Katie and Simon
                > To: campernicholson@yahoogroups.com
                > Sent: Saturday, March 20, 2004 4:00 PM
                > Subject: [campernicholson] Perkins 4-108
                >
                >
                > Hello CN team,
                >
                > All this talk about engines has got me thinking.
                > Katie and I are planning
                > to
                > up sticks from Canada and head back to Gin Rummy in
                > Turkey this summer.
                > By
                > the time we get to her, she'll have been sitting on
                > the hard for almost 3
                > years. Initially we plan to spend a few months
                > living on board in Turkey
                > while we refurbish her.
                >
                > I know there are lots of things to do, but my
                > biggest concern is the
                > engine.
                > I've never left one untouched for so long before.
                > About 6 months before
                > we
                > laid the boat up I fitted new injectors, replaced
                > the fuel pump and had
                > the
                > high-pressure pump reconditioned with new seals.
                The
                > engine was running
                > fine
                > when we left it, and I winterised it as usual,
                > incuding pouring a bit of
                > oil
                > into the cylinders through the inlet manifold.
                >
                > When we go back I'm planning at the very least to
                do
                > a top overhaul and
                > replace the cylinder head gasket, etc. But I'd
                also
                > like to purchase
                > beforehand any other spares that I'm likely to need
                > - they're not always
                > available in Turkey. Does anyone have any
                experience
                > of restarting a
                > long-stored engine, and what the condition is
                likely
                > to be? Also, any
                > tips
                > for do's and don'ts before I get it started?!
                >
                > I'd appreciate your thoughts.
                >
                > Simon (& Katie)
                > Gin Rummy, CN35-202
                >
                >
                >
                _________________________________________________________________
                > Stay in touch with absent friends - get MSN
                Messenger
                > http://www.msn.co.uk/messenger
                >
                >
                >
                >
                ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                > a.. To visit your group on the web, go to:
                > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/campernicholson/
                >
                > b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email
                > to:
                > campernicholson-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                >
                > c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the
                > Yahoo! Terms of
                > Service.
                >
                >
                _________________________________________________________________
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                > http://www.msn.co.uk/messenger
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                >
              • Ann & Roger Haggar
                Hi Simon. Many thanks for yr advice on Perkins 4108 I bought Nich 38 Hull No 117 in same condition in 1996 and have just about finished the rebuild, taking in
                Message 7 of 9 , Apr 2, 2004
                • 0 Attachment
                  Hi Simon. Many thanks for yr advice on Perkins 4108
                  I bought Nich 38 Hull No 117 in same condition in 1996 and have just about
                  finished the rebuild, taking in a 2 yr cruise Vancouver- Mexico and now back
                  in Vcr with the boat. Main problem found on return was to rebuild injector
                  pump after 2 yrs use. Found most internal seals perished. It could be the
                  fuel picked up in Mexico, the fuel additive, or the pump just did not like
                  the heat.
                  Thks again for the article -and- having done it, the boat rebuild that is ,
                  would be pleased to advise, for what it's worth. Rgds


                  >From: "Simon Rayfield" <srayfield@...>
                  >Reply-To: campernicholson@yahoogroups.com
                  >To: <campernicholson@yahoogroups.com>
                  >Subject: Re: [campernicholson] Perkins 4-108
                  >Date: Wed, 24 Mar 2004 16:50:32 -0000
                  >
                  >Hi
                  >
                  >Use the old saying - "If it is not broken, why fix it!" I know you have
                  >already had one list from Jeff, but here is mine anyway, some things
                  >obviously rely on commonsense and are repeated. I am intrigued by the
                  >"Marvel Mystery Oil" this must be a US or Canadian product, this sort of
                  >thing is frowned upon in the UK for reasons of atmospheric polution (ie
                  >lots of smoke), we used to be able to get a very strong Redex upper
                  >cylinder lubricant additive that would "blow the engine's socks off"on
                  >start up! As you are in Turkey, be aware that several UK Yacht Charter
                  >companies operate here (Marmaris, etc), these should have competent diesel
                  >engine mechanics as part of the crews and would have contact with UK for
                  >spares, etc.
                  >
                  >The Perkins engine is extremely reliable and robust. The most important
                  >job is to change oil and filter regularly and keep the fuel and cooling
                  >systems in good health. Since yours has been laid up for some time (but
                  >has had new injectors and a squirt of oil in the bores) I would run
                  >through the following list:
                  >
                  > a.. Get the batteries topped up (if not sealed units) and fully charged
                  >up
                  > b.. Drain out the oil and change the filter. Refill with supermarket
                  >brand (cheap) diesel engine oil, these engines are unsophisticated and
                  >cheap oil is fine provided it adheres to a standard diesel oil spec. The
                  >expensive oil just contains more additives, etc.
                  > c.. Change fuel filter
                  > d.. Check fuel bowl for water, etc. If the fuel tank wasn't left full
                  >up - check fuel tank lower drain cock for water (condensation), etc if it
                  >isn't seized closed
                  > e.. Fit fuel lift pump diaphragm kit or keep a spare onboard
                  > f.. Check the engine for signs of water leakage, particularly if it
                  >could have suffered freezing temperatures
                  > g.. Replace the rubber water pump impellor, check pump shaft seal as
                  >this can leak water into the bilge and whilst in the 'black hole' check the
                  >drive belts and possibly replace if there are signs of cracking when the
                  >belt is flexed
                  > h.. Check alternator(s) are free to turn and terminals are not corroded
                  > i.. Try and get a spanner on the end pulley (when checking the water
                  >pump) and turn the engine over by hand. If you cannot turn it by hand with
                  >reasonable leverage I would start to worry - but I think this would be
                  >highly unlikely
                  > j.. Check water hoses and clips
                  > k.. I assume the boat is on the hard, so connect a freshwater hose to
                  >the seawater side and give it a good flush and check for leaks at the same
                  >time.
                  > l.. Flush freshwater side and header tank into bilge
                  > m.. Check starter motor electrics for corrosion. If they look green and
                  >horrid dismantle, clean terminals, apply vaseline and reconnect, similarly
                  >the battery and alternator terminals
                  > n.. If all of these items checks out OK - spin it over on the starter,
                  >watch for oil pressure even at cranking speed
                  > o.. Go for a start, warm it through thoroughly (give it a good run as
                  >these engines tend to run cool), check for leaks, when satisfied, shutdown
                  >and change the oil again if it is very dirty.
                  > Note: Unfortunately this will involve a prolonged run in neutral, but if
                  >you are on the hard you have no option.
                  > p.. Check the toilet and bilge pumps, as these have soft rubber
                  >diaphragms and valves - a failed toilet pump is catastrophic!
                  >Tips from a local UK Perkins agent:
                  > a.. Don't waste money on new or spare injectors, they are very expensive
                  >and last for ever if taken out occasionally and serviced by a commercial
                  >vehicle injector agent.
                  > b.. When removing or refitting an injector, take precautions to prevent
                  >carbon, etc from falling into the cylinder. If it does, use a screwdriver
                  >with a gob of grease on the end to get it out (piston on TDC) - don't trust
                  >unknown mechanics, etc., as these injectors ar messy to change and need
                  >care to get a good, longterm seal
                  > c.. Always fit a new copper ring to the injector body and preferably
                  >anneal (soften) the ring with heat before fitting in order to get a good
                  >seal. Failure to clean the seat and get a gastight fit may result in
                  >combustion gas blowing past the seat and causing a carbon build up in the
                  >recess and around the engine compartment.
                  > d.. If using a powerful decarbonizing cyclinder cleaner (Marvel Mystery
                  >Oil?) recheck the valve clearances (0.012" cold) as carbon removed from
                  >valve seats, etc may cause the clearances to change
                  >And finally - if you are worried about the cylinder head, etc., remove the
                  >injectors, buy or borrow a diesel engine compression tester and run a
                  >compression check (or watch an agent do it for you). The cylinder
                  >compression values are a first rate check of the engine condition as they
                  >can be compared to the Perkins recommended pressure and more important they
                  >should all be equal or within a few psi of each other. If these pressures
                  >are seriously different or low - you may need to strip the top end!!
                  >
                  >When (or if) you dismantle the fuel system take care to avoid air leaks
                  >and always replace the fuel filter at regular intervals. I didn't, and a
                  >choppy sea stirred up the sediment in the fuel tank, this in turn settled
                  >in the filter and weeks later the engine speed became impossible to
                  >control. The problem was a partially blocked fuel filter causing the
                  >governor/injector pump to 'stonewall' and draw in air from apparently
                  >secure connections resulting in an air-locked unstable governor, and hence
                  >hefty speed fluctuations! This is also a cautionary tale for those of us
                  >(me included) that never look inside our fuel tanks.
                  >
                  >Question: Have you ever checked your fuel bowl after or when motoring
                  >through a rough sea - if it goes opaque or dark, you have a potential
                  >problem lurking in the fuel tank. I always check my fuel bowl when tied up
                  >alongside (we all do it) and not surprisingly it is perfectly clear! After
                  >all, who wants to poke around the engine room when the boat is standing on
                  >its end!
                  >
                  >In closing - my Perkins has been in the boat since new (72), has over 6600
                  >hours on the clock and apart from routine maintenance is still going
                  >strong.....and there are probably other personal tips that others can add.
                  >A lot of my engine experience has come the hard way whilst running the
                  >engine each day for 5 weeks whilst transitting the French canal system from
                  >Med to Channel. Only major problem was the blocked fuel filter causing
                  >unstable engine speed, this seems totally bizarre but is a known problem
                  >with dirty fuel in a diesel.
                  >
                  >All the best
                  >
                  >Simon
                  >Dediou#42
                  >
                  >ps to Bob Barker if you read this epic and want to use any of it for the
                  >C&N Newsletter, please do. I am currently recovering from local hospital
                  >day surgery (nose ream out) and have been told I must not play at boats for
                  >48 hours. I must add that a lot of the jobs above are still waiting for
                  >me to do, particularly opening up the fuel tank and getting in there - ugh!
                  > ----- Original Message -----
                  > From: Katie and Simon
                  > To: campernicholson@yahoogroups.com
                  > Sent: Saturday, March 20, 2004 4:00 PM
                  > Subject: [campernicholson] Perkins 4-108
                  >
                  >
                  > Hello CN team,
                  >
                  > All this talk about engines has got me thinking. Katie and I are
                  >planning to
                  > up sticks from Canada and head back to Gin Rummy in Turkey this summer.
                  >By
                  > the time we get to her, she'll have been sitting on the hard for almost
                  >3
                  > years. Initially we plan to spend a few months living on board in Turkey
                  > while we refurbish her.
                  >
                  > I know there are lots of things to do, but my biggest concern is the
                  >engine.
                  > I've never left one untouched for so long before. About 6 months before
                  >we
                  > laid the boat up I fitted new injectors, replaced the fuel pump and had
                  >the
                  > high-pressure pump reconditioned with new seals. The engine was running
                  >fine
                  > when we left it, and I winterised it as usual, incuding pouring a bit of
                  >oil
                  > into the cylinders through the inlet manifold.
                  >
                  > When we go back I'm planning at the very least to do a top overhaul and
                  > replace the cylinder head gasket, etc. But I'd also like to purchase
                  > beforehand any other spares that I'm likely to need - they're not always
                  > available in Turkey. Does anyone have any experience of restarting a
                  > long-stored engine, and what the condition is likely to be? Also, any
                  >tips
                  > for do's and don'ts before I get it started?!
                  >
                  > I'd appreciate your thoughts.
                  >
                  > Simon (& Katie)
                  > Gin Rummy, CN35-202
                  >
                  > _________________________________________________________________
                  > Stay in touch with absent friends - get MSN Messenger
                  > http://www.msn.co.uk/messenger
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  > a.. To visit your group on the web, go to:
                  > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/campernicholson/
                  >
                  > b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  > campernicholson-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                  >
                  > c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
                  >Service.
                  >

                  _________________________________________________________________
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                • Jon Amtrup
                  Hi, Yesterday I tried too motor out of the harbour here in Oslo to enjoy the Easter aboard. But nothing happened when I put the motor in forward - and neither
                  Message 8 of 9 , Apr 2, 2004
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Hi,

                    Yesterday I tried too motor out of the harbour here in Oslo to enjoy the
                    Easter aboard. But nothing happened when I put the motor in forward - and
                    neither in back. I have a hydraulic transmission on my Perkins. The shaft (?
                    the rod between the propeller and the hydraulic box) only turns when it
                    wants too when we put here in forward/back and its not able too move the
                    boat.

                    Anyone out there that has any ideas about what I need to do to get the boat
                    going again?

                    Best Jon
                    S/Y Peldon Rose


                    -----Opprinnelig melding-----
                    Fra: Ann & Roger Haggar [mailto:racepassage@...]
                    Sendt: 2. april 2004 11:29
                    Til: campernicholson@yahoogroups.com
                    Emne: Re: [campernicholson] Perkins 4-108

                    Hi Simon. Many thanks for yr advice on Perkins 4108
                    I bought Nich 38 Hull No 117 in same condition in 1996 and have just about
                    finished the rebuild, taking in a 2 yr cruise Vancouver- Mexico and now back

                    in Vcr with the boat. Main problem found on return was to rebuild injector
                    pump after 2 yrs use. Found most internal seals perished. It could be the
                    fuel picked up in Mexico, the fuel additive, or the pump just did not like
                    the heat.
                    Thks again for the article -and- having done it, the boat rebuild that is ,
                    would be pleased to advise, for what it's worth. Rgds


                    >From: "Simon Rayfield" <srayfield@...>
                    >Reply-To: campernicholson@yahoogroups.com
                    >To: <campernicholson@yahoogroups.com>
                    >Subject: Re: [campernicholson] Perkins 4-108
                    >Date: Wed, 24 Mar 2004 16:50:32 -0000
                    >
                    >Hi
                    >
                    >Use the old saying - "If it is not broken, why fix it!" I know you have
                    >already had one list from Jeff, but here is mine anyway, some things
                    >obviously rely on commonsense and are repeated. I am intrigued by the
                    >"Marvel Mystery Oil" this must be a US or Canadian product, this sort of
                    >thing is frowned upon in the UK for reasons of atmospheric polution (ie
                    >lots of smoke), we used to be able to get a very strong Redex upper
                    >cylinder lubricant additive that would "blow the engine's socks off"on
                    >start up! As you are in Turkey, be aware that several UK Yacht Charter
                    >companies operate here (Marmaris, etc), these should have competent diesel
                    >engine mechanics as part of the crews and would have contact with UK for
                    >spares, etc.
                    >
                    >The Perkins engine is extremely reliable and robust. The most important
                    >job is to change oil and filter regularly and keep the fuel and cooling
                    >systems in good health. Since yours has been laid up for some time (but
                    >has had new injectors and a squirt of oil in the bores) I would run
                    >through the following list:
                    >
                    > a.. Get the batteries topped up (if not sealed units) and fully charged
                    >up
                    > b.. Drain out the oil and change the filter. Refill with supermarket
                    >brand (cheap) diesel engine oil, these engines are unsophisticated and
                    >cheap oil is fine provided it adheres to a standard diesel oil spec. The
                    >expensive oil just contains more additives, etc.
                    > c.. Change fuel filter
                    > d.. Check fuel bowl for water, etc. If the fuel tank wasn't left full
                    >up - check fuel tank lower drain cock for water (condensation), etc if it
                    >isn't seized closed
                    > e.. Fit fuel lift pump diaphragm kit or keep a spare onboard
                    > f.. Check the engine for signs of water leakage, particularly if it
                    >could have suffered freezing temperatures
                    > g.. Replace the rubber water pump impellor, check pump shaft seal as
                    >this can leak water into the bilge and whilst in the 'black hole' check the

                    >drive belts and possibly replace if there are signs of cracking when the
                    >belt is flexed
                    > h.. Check alternator(s) are free to turn and terminals are not corroded
                    > i.. Try and get a spanner on the end pulley (when checking the water
                    >pump) and turn the engine over by hand. If you cannot turn it by hand with

                    >reasonable leverage I would start to worry - but I think this would be
                    >highly unlikely
                    > j.. Check water hoses and clips
                    > k.. I assume the boat is on the hard, so connect a freshwater hose to
                    >the seawater side and give it a good flush and check for leaks at the same
                    >time.
                    > l.. Flush freshwater side and header tank into bilge
                    > m.. Check starter motor electrics for corrosion. If they look green and

                    >horrid dismantle, clean terminals, apply vaseline and reconnect, similarly
                    >the battery and alternator terminals
                    > n.. If all of these items checks out OK - spin it over on the starter,
                    >watch for oil pressure even at cranking speed
                    > o.. Go for a start, warm it through thoroughly (give it a good run as
                    >these engines tend to run cool), check for leaks, when satisfied, shutdown

                    >and change the oil again if it is very dirty.
                    > Note: Unfortunately this will involve a prolonged run in neutral, but if

                    >you are on the hard you have no option.
                    > p.. Check the toilet and bilge pumps, as these have soft rubber
                    >diaphragms and valves - a failed toilet pump is catastrophic!
                    >Tips from a local UK Perkins agent:
                    > a.. Don't waste money on new or spare injectors, they are very expensive

                    >and last for ever if taken out occasionally and serviced by a commercial
                    >vehicle injector agent.
                    > b.. When removing or refitting an injector, take precautions to prevent
                    >carbon, etc from falling into the cylinder. If it does, use a screwdriver
                    >with a gob of grease on the end to get it out (piston on TDC) - don't trust

                    >unknown mechanics, etc., as these injectors ar messy to change and need
                    >care to get a good, longterm seal
                    > c.. Always fit a new copper ring to the injector body and preferably
                    >anneal (soften) the ring with heat before fitting in order to get a good
                    >seal. Failure to clean the seat and get a gastight fit may result in
                    >combustion gas blowing past the seat and causing a carbon build up in the
                    >recess and around the engine compartment.
                    > d.. If using a powerful decarbonizing cyclinder cleaner (Marvel Mystery
                    >Oil?) recheck the valve clearances (0.012" cold) as carbon removed from
                    >valve seats, etc may cause the clearances to change
                    >And finally - if you are worried about the cylinder head, etc., remove the
                    >injectors, buy or borrow a diesel engine compression tester and run a
                    >compression check (or watch an agent do it for you). The cylinder
                    >compression values are a first rate check of the engine condition as they
                    >can be compared to the Perkins recommended pressure and more important they

                    >should all be equal or within a few psi of each other. If these pressures
                    >are seriously different or low - you may need to strip the top end!!
                    >
                    >When (or if) you dismantle the fuel system take care to avoid air leaks
                    >and always replace the fuel filter at regular intervals. I didn't, and a
                    >choppy sea stirred up the sediment in the fuel tank, this in turn settled
                    >in the filter and weeks later the engine speed became impossible to
                    >control. The problem was a partially blocked fuel filter causing the
                    >governor/injector pump to 'stonewall' and draw in air from apparently
                    >secure connections resulting in an air-locked unstable governor, and hence
                    >hefty speed fluctuations! This is also a cautionary tale for those of us
                    >(me included) that never look inside our fuel tanks.
                    >
                    >Question: Have you ever checked your fuel bowl after or when motoring
                    >through a rough sea - if it goes opaque or dark, you have a potential
                    >problem lurking in the fuel tank. I always check my fuel bowl when tied up

                    >alongside (we all do it) and not surprisingly it is perfectly clear! After

                    >all, who wants to poke around the engine room when the boat is standing on
                    >its end!
                    >
                    >In closing - my Perkins has been in the boat since new (72), has over 6600
                    >hours on the clock and apart from routine maintenance is still going
                    >strong.....and there are probably other personal tips that others can add.

                    >A lot of my engine experience has come the hard way whilst running the
                    >engine each day for 5 weeks whilst transitting the French canal system from

                    >Med to Channel. Only major problem was the blocked fuel filter causing
                    >unstable engine speed, this seems totally bizarre but is a known problem
                    >with dirty fuel in a diesel.
                    >
                    >All the best
                    >
                    >Simon
                    >Dediou#42
                    >
                    >ps to Bob Barker if you read this epic and want to use any of it for the
                    >C&N Newsletter, please do. I am currently recovering from local hospital
                    >day surgery (nose ream out) and have been told I must not play at boats for

                    >48 hours. I must add that a lot of the jobs above are still waiting for
                    >me to do, particularly opening up the fuel tank and getting in there - ugh!
                    > ----- Original Message -----
                    > From: Katie and Simon
                    > To: campernicholson@yahoogroups.com
                    > Sent: Saturday, March 20, 2004 4:00 PM
                    > Subject: [campernicholson] Perkins 4-108
                    >
                    >
                    > Hello CN team,
                    >
                    > All this talk about engines has got me thinking. Katie and I are
                    >planning to
                    > up sticks from Canada and head back to Gin Rummy in Turkey this summer.
                    >By
                    > the time we get to her, she'll have been sitting on the hard for almost
                    >3
                    > years. Initially we plan to spend a few months living on board in Turkey
                    > while we refurbish her.
                    >
                    > I know there are lots of things to do, but my biggest concern is the
                    >engine.
                    > I've never left one untouched for so long before. About 6 months before
                    >we
                    > laid the boat up I fitted new injectors, replaced the fuel pump and had
                    >the
                    > high-pressure pump reconditioned with new seals. The engine was running
                    >fine
                    > when we left it, and I winterised it as usual, incuding pouring a bit of

                    >oil
                    > into the cylinders through the inlet manifold.
                    >
                    > When we go back I'm planning at the very least to do a top overhaul and
                    > replace the cylinder head gasket, etc. But I'd also like to purchase
                    > beforehand any other spares that I'm likely to need - they're not always
                    > available in Turkey. Does anyone have any experience of restarting a
                    > long-stored engine, and what the condition is likely to be? Also, any
                    >tips
                    > for do's and don'ts before I get it started?!
                    >
                    > I'd appreciate your thoughts.
                    >
                    > Simon (& Katie)
                    > Gin Rummy, CN35-202
                    >
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