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RE: [campernicholson] Nich 35 Headsail Survey

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  • Katie and Simon
    Jim, I don t have access to the boat right now, but I do have the plans here including the sail plan, and the dimensions look about right. The plans show an I
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 31, 2003
      Jim,

      I don't have access to the boat right now, but I do have the plans here
      including the sail plan, and the dimensions look about right. The plans show
      an I measurement of 43'3" but our mast is 2' taller at 45'3". That's
      equivalent to a distance of 44'4" from the top of the coachroof to the
      masthead on our boat.

      The sail plan shows a furling genoa as 130%, and from the cut and position
      of the clew that's what I've always assumed ours to be although I haven't
      measured it. We carry full sail until 20 knots of wind, above which we start
      to reef down. I suppose we could do with a bit more horsepower in light
      airs, but I've never wanted a bigger genoa because I'm concerned that the
      extra sail area behind the mast will induce more weather helm. In fact, as
      the wind gets up we often put an early reef in the mainsail because the boat
      seems better balanced that way. Note that we usually sail with a Monitor
      windvane so we like to keep the rudder forces down if we can.

      Off the wind in light airs we use a drifter, or assymetric, or DRS, or
      whatever they're called these days! We find it very useful in anything from
      a beam reach to about 30 degrees either side of downwind, but it moves
      around too much if we try to use it on a dead run. We carry the drifter up
      to about 12-15 knots of wind.

      Hope this helps. I'm interested to hear what others do to get the most out
      of their sails.

      Simon & Katie
      Gin Rummy, CN35-202

      _________________________________________________________________
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    • Dennis Gibbons
      Dark Lady has the tall rig, roller furling and a removable inner forestay. I like that combination. My Big roller furlers is a 155% which I need in the summer
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 31, 2003
        Dark Lady has the tall rig, roller furling and a removable inner forestay.
        I like that combination. My Big roller furlers is a 155% which I need in the
        summer if I am going to move at all on Long Island Sound. For the Bermuda
        Race, I had a 135% made for the roller furler and it (as the results
        indicate) was perfect. For heavier weather (30 knts+) I have a staysail and
        a storm jib for the inner forestay.
        All that said, as you have the shorter mast no doubt, I would lean toward
        the lager foresail.
        Dennis Gibbons
        S/V Dark Lady
        CN35-207
        email: dennis dash gibbons at worldnet dot att dot net
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: <BarryR8195@...>
        To: <campernicholson@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Tuesday, December 30, 2003 7:09 PM
        Subject: Re: [campernicholson] Nich 35 Headsail Survey


        > Jim--We had a 150% hank on Genoa that we converted to roller furling. It
        was
        > cut down a little bit, so that it is now probably about a 140% overlap
        when
        > completely unfurled. The full main & headsail are good up to about 15
        knots
        > of true wind. Note--Wildflower (C & N 35 # 151) has the original rig.
        > Starting in the early 80's C & N added about 18" to the mast on boats
        shipped to the
        > USA. The newer USA boats carry more sail and must reef down a little bit
        > earlier. You should also find out if the boats have the original or tall
        > rig.--Barry
        >
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