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Re: Raw water engine intake system

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  • jaaxcarr@citi-link.com
    -Rayfield, I heard from Blake Seacocks. They said the keep plate bolts are 3/8 whitworth on all of their seacocks. I guess the bolt head and nuts are
    Message 1 of 22 , May 31, 2001
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      -Rayfield, I heard from Blake Seacocks. They said the keep plate bolts
      are 3/8" whitworth on all of their seacocks. I guess the bolt head and
      nuts are oversized from standard 3/8's. The zinc on the hull seems to
      be the same. This brings me to that question: the hull zinc. The boat
      came with a supply of zincs each with a foam piece. I dug out the old
      zinc and a foam piece was behind it. But with a new zinc and foam the
      bolt is barely long enough. Is this foam piece necessary? I was
      looking at some old messages. One from Denice a while back on zinc. I
      am confused. She refers to a Dynaplate. That is what our CN blueprints
      use and that is where our zinc is. Yet Denice replaced this with a
      copper plate? But she also talks about using Zinc plate. Does Denice/
      Blue Pearl have two places for this? Also, our thru bolts for the zinc
      are probably orginal. They are steel (mild steel) with slightly rusty
      nuts on the inside and the outside, but not corroded. Nigel Calder in
      his book said not to use stainless (but did not say what to use). Are
      other owner replacing these thru bolts. I see Denice uses Bronze on
      their zinc (I'm not sure which one). At least the mild steel will not
      corrode as it is closer on the galvanic scale.
      Dennis the mystery is over. It must have been a sea chest (though
      I've never seen one). The other main hose was plugged. I believe there
      was some form of refrigeration. I am taking it all out and running a
      hose direct to the raw water pump.
      Tom
      S/V Lea-Rig
      CN #189








      -- In campernicholson@y..., Rayfield Simon <simon.rayfield@s...>
      wrote:
      > A brief note on Blakes seacocks. If neither a metric nor an AF wrench will
      > fit properly it is likely that the threads and nuts are British threads,
      > probably BSF (British Standard Fine). Both BSF and BSW (British Standard
      > Whitworth) were the mainstay of British engineering for decades and were
      > ultimately superceded by the unified threads UNC (coarse) and UNF (fine)
      > both using AF wrenches.
      >
      > These British threads used nuts and spanners that had unique sizes either a
      > bit bigger or smaller than the AF and metric range of spanners. This may
      > not be a lot of help but might explain your problems with fit. It is
      > possible that an ironmonger may have some hidden in his stock if you ask
      > specifically for a BSF or BSW............Anyhow I think Blakes are still in
      > business in UK, try the internet!
      >
      > Simon
      > Dediou #42
      >
      >
      >
      > > -----Original Message-----
      > > From: jaaxcarr@c... [SMTP:jaaxcarr@c...]
      > > Sent: 24 May 2001 06:12
      > > To: campernicholson@y...
      > > Subject: [campernicholson] Raw water engine intake system
      > >
      > > Greetings fellow members. We purchased our Nicholson 35, #189 over
      > > a year and a half ago, and finally we are near our boat to dig into
      > > our "list" of repairs and upgrades. We moved her from Puget Sound to
      > > Lake Superior. That may not sound logical, but for now that is where
      > > we are.
      > > We are replacing the ball valves under the stove with seacocks, one
      > > of which is the raw water intake for the engine. I had not realized
      > > further in is this 5 in. diameter, 15 inch long stainless steel
      > > cylinder mounted vertically where the hose goes into at the bottom and
      > > a 1 inch hose loop to the engine (one at the top and one 3 inches down
      > > the side). What is this device? Also, I not done. There is another
      > > fitting into the top, one-quarter in. copper going to a brass cylinder
      > > (3 inch diam by 10"long). From that a one-quarter inch loop of copper
      > > tubing leading aft into the cockpit locker to a disconnected flare
      > > fitting. The brass cylinder looks coated with diesel residue. This all
      > > looks like a minature of our hot water tank with its heat exchanger. A
      > > real mystery to us.
      > > On another subject, we were taking apart the Blake seacocks, giving
      > > some tender lapping compound care and greasing them up. Well, I had a
      > > heck of a time finding the right wrench to work on the lock nut. Six
      > > point 15mm best on the bolt, but no room on the nut. Open 15mm too
      > > tight. 5/8 six point also ok, but no room on the nut and open is too
      > > loose. Am I missing some other system of weights and measurements?
      > > I enjoyed reading everyone's contribution. It has been a big help.
      > >
      > > Tom Jaax
      > > Marian Carr
      > > s/v Lea-Rig
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service
      > > <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/>.
    • Denece Vincent
      Tom, Yes, we have two attachments under the water; the zinc near the galley, which was bonded to all the underwater metal and (we believe) led to the demise of
      Message 2 of 22 , Jun 1, 2001
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        Tom,
        Yes, we have two attachments under the water; the zinc near the galley,
        which was bonded to all the underwater metal and (we believe) led to the
        demise of all our Blakes seacocks and the Dynaplate (now replaced with a
        large copper sheet) near the mast. We used Stainless bolts this time but we
        are keeping an eye on them. We have learned that the main culprit in
        electrolytic corrosion in our area is from leaving the shore plug
        connected, since most of the marinas are older and the wiring not up to
        current research.
        Our project right now is the rebuilding of the ice box. Ours was a double
        walled fiberglass box containing almost two whole inches of crumbling foam,
        except for where there wasn't any. We have almost got it all out and will
        replace with 4-8" of sealed urethane foam and a layer of heat shield on the
        outer side. We hope it will enable us to run a Cool Blue unit off solar
        panels alone.
        This living aboard and doing projects is real interesting. You sure can't
        get away from the mess and confusion!!

        Denece
      • mclarenR@aol.com
        Blakes sea cocks are available through Defender. Go to www.defender.com --Richard McLaren 1970 S&S 37 Dulcinea
        Message 3 of 22 , Jun 2, 2001
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          Blakes sea cocks are available through Defender.  Go to

          www.defender.com

          --Richard McLaren
          1970 S&S 37 Dulcinea
        • Graham Norbury
          Hi! Trudy and I just got back from a week long vacation in the Chesapeake Bay where we spent a couple of nights in Waterside Marina near downtown Norfolk,
          Message 4 of 22 , Jun 2, 2001
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            Hi!
             
            Trudy and I just got back from a week long vacation in the Chesapeake Bay where we spent a couple of nights in Waterside Marina near downtown Norfolk, Virginia.  Nice place, but I don't like their electrical system one bit!   
             
            For two days we were trying to figure out the source of a mysterious "tapping" sound (like crabs clawing the hull) occurring on the outside of the sink discharge thru-hull.  On the second day I searched a little more carefully and noticed the same problem at EVERY seacock :(   All I can imagine is the water was full of stray electric currently and were eating away the seacocks at a fast rate, regardless of whether the shore power was connected or not.
             
            Weird huh?
            Graham
             
            ----- Original Message -----
            <snip>
            Yes, we have two attachments under the water; the zinc near the galley,
            which was bonded to all the underwater metal and (we believe) led to the
            demise of all our Blakes seacocks and the Dynaplate (now replaced with a
            large copper sheet) near the mast.
            <snip>
          • Denece Vincent
            Shotgun shrimp? We have them on the southern portions of this (west) coast and they make a noise known to give mariners the heebie-jeebies! Denece--having a
            Message 5 of 22 , Jun 2, 2001
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              Shotgun shrimp? We have them on the southern portions of this (west) coast
              and they make a noise known to give mariners the heebie-jeebies!
              Denece--having a small amount of success at the infamous ice-box refit.

              At 10:17 PM 6/2/01 -0400, you wrote:
              >Hi!
              >
              >Trudy and I just got back from a week long vacation in the Chesapeake Bay
              >where we spent a couple of nights in Waterside Marina near downtown
              >Norfolk, Virginia. Nice place, but I don't like their electrical system
              >one bit!
              >
              >For two days we were trying to figure out the source of a mysterious
              >"tapping" sound (like crabs clawing the hull) occurring on the outside of
              >the sink discharge thru-hull. On the second day I searched a little more
              >carefully and noticed the same problem at EVERY seacock :( All I can
              >imagine is the water was full of stray electric currently and were eating
              >away the seacocks at a fast rate, regardless of whether the shore power
              >was connected or not.
              >
              >Weird huh?
              >Graham
              >
              >----- Original Message -----
              ><snip>
              >Yes, we have two attachments under the water; the zinc near the galley,
              >which was bonded to all the underwater metal and (we believe) led to the
              >demise of all our Blakes seacocks and the Dynaplate (now replaced with a
              >large copper sheet) near the mast.
              ><snip>
              >
              >Yahoo! Groups
              >Sponsor<http://rd.yahoo.com/M=206662.1458837.3039162.908943/D=egroupmail/S=1700065791:N/A=682980/*http://altfarm.mediaplex.com/ad/ck/1114-3934-1039-0?mpt=991534873>
              >
              >
              >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the
              ><http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/>Yahoo! Terms of Service.
            • Jeffrey Moorman
              Denece, Yup, those are probably bigger out there...here they are still only classified as handguns... Jeff N35 LaBoheme North Beach, MD
              Message 6 of 22 , Jun 7, 2001
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                Denece,

                Yup, those are probably bigger out there...here they are still only classified as handguns...

                Jeff
                N35 LaBoheme
                North Beach, MD
              • Tony Howard
                Hi all, Just returned from 2 1/2 weeks taking Judicious (Nic 35) to SW Ireland. Tedious crossing form the UK (54 hours to windward) but glorious when I got
                Message 7 of 22 , Jun 12, 2001
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                  Hi all,

                  Just returned from 2 1/2 weeks taking Judicious (Nic 35) to SW
                  Ireland. Tedious crossing form the UK (54 hours to windward) but
                  glorious when I got there. Story and pics should be on my up-dated
                  web site by 22nd June (providing not too much work gets in the
                  way....) returning to Judicious on 23rd June.

                  Catching-up on the postings to the ng.

                  Zincs

                  Mine is attached with a galvanised bolt, as sold by MG Duff. This is
                  now about 9 years old since I glassed it in, and although a bit rusty
                  still appears to be serviceable. I always put the nuts on with a good
                  dollop of stern gland/underwater grease. I would be careful about
                  using any other material.

                  Stern glands

                  A sailing buddy had a nasty experience with a 'dripless' gland. His
                  boat dried out, and he forget to fill the gland with water (not sure
                  of the make, but this was done by squeezing the rubber boot). As a
                  result it was no longer dripless............(in fact 'drip' was an
                  understatement, I gather it was more like Niagara falls).

                  I fitted a new prop shaft with a conventional packed gland with a
                  greaser 5 seasons ago. For the first time I had to tighten it up
                  this year (only about 1/2 turn on the nuts), but it is fine.

                  Rgds

                  Tony
                  www.yacht-judicious.co.uk
                • Jteipen@aol.com
                  Tom During our last haul out almost 2 years ago, I replaced the hull zinc and bolts with parts that I purchased from Camper Nicholson. I didn t use the foam
                  Message 8 of 22 , Jun 12, 2001
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                    Tom

                    During our last haul out almost 2 years ago, I replaced the hull zinc and
                    bolts with parts that I purchased from Camper Nicholson.   I didn't use the
                    foam backing.  I simply used some bedding compound to bed the square plate on
                    the bolts to the outside of the hull and drew them up tight with large
                    washers and nuts on the inside.  I've never had it leak at all.  Next time
                    around, I'm going to cut my own zinc out of a larger plate.

                    Jim
                    SV Alegria
                    CN 35  #68
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