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4752Re: Question re: fitting

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  • mumeskara
    May 1, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Nick-o-lodians is my favourite!


      --- In campernicholson@yahoogroups.com, "minnehaha64" <russ.armstrong@...> wrote:
      >
      > Graham, et al,
      >
      > Well, that's it. I've been pounded into submission by the irrefutable logic and experience of my fellow Nickophiles (Nick-heads? Nick-o-lodians?). Also re-read an article from the May/June issue of Ocean Navigator on this issue, plus a piece written by Joe Cooper. Using the solent to hoist the storm jib seems to be by far the simplest way to proceed, and everyone seems to say that it works just fine. Not to mention, the $$$ being spend on the ssb are largely for the purpose of being able to avoid bad weather in the first place.
      >
      > In addition, the solent stay could be used to fly twin Genoas downwind, or as Colin notes in the next message, a smallish "blade" beating in heavier air. This forum certainly serves a purpose; there's comfort in numbers. We might all be wrong, but we'll all be wrong together . . . and then our wives can't blame us.
      >
      > Russ
      >
      > --- In campernicholson@yahoogroups.com, Graham Norbury <gnorbury@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Jeremy Lines once told me that the Solent stay concept was how the Nic35
      > > was originally rigged. Basically you attach the "spare" wire-rope genoa
      > > halyard to the rear of the stemhead fitting, hank the storm jib on this
      > > & raise it using the halyard that exits just below the masthead.
      > >
      > > On Luna Azul we eliminated the heavy wire-rope halyards and replaced
      > > them with Technora cordage. On the few occasions we needed a storm jib,
      > > the hi tech Solent stay worked fine, and somewhat surprisingly with bo
      > > sign of chafe from the bronze sail hanks. I'd say it was a whole lot
      > > more convenient than installing a true inner forestay, even at the
      > > expense of having the foot of the sail nearer the bow.
      > >
      > > Graham
      > >
      > > minnehaha64 wrote:
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Colin,
      > > >
      > > > My boat seems to have an inner forestay attachment point in the
      > > > stemhead fitting, and there is a flange on the forward face of the
      > > > mast a few inches below the top of the mast. I think these fittings
      > > > are there for the installation of a "Solent" stay. The advice I've
      > > > found for the storm jib and storm trysail is they be close to the mast
      > > > to concentrate the center of effort. Mounting the stay a bit further
      > > > aft and a bit lower down the mast accomplishes that, but it puts the
      > > > lower mounting point at a less-massive section of the deck and will
      > > > require running backs. Everything's a compromise.
      > > >
      > > > I've toyed with the idea of moving the forestay, along with furler and
      > > > headsail back to the Solent mounting points, and installing a Code
      > > > Zero ahead. Haven't run that by my rigging advisor. Will he laugh at me?
      > > >
      > > > Russ
      > > >
      > > > --- In campernicholson@yahoogroups.com
      > > > <mailto:campernicholson%40yahoogroups.com>, "Colin Campbell-Dunlop"
      > > > <colinj@> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > Hi Russ,
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > We have just put an inner forestay fitting on our boat. It is well
      > > > forward,
      > > > > between the windlass and about 8 inches back from the existing stay. I
      > > > > don't know what your plans are but we found that mounting it that far
      > > > > forward killed two birds with one stone. It is attached high enough
      > > > on the
      > > > > mast to avoid the need for running backstays and also is in a very
      > > > heavily
      > > > > constructed part of the deck. In the opinion of the yard we used and
      > > > of the
      > > > > surveyor who looked at it there is no need to tie in to a point in
      > > > the hull.
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > This said, the fitting is very heavy duty and has a s/s backing plate
      > > > > underneath which is definitely of the 'no nonsense/bomb proof'
      > > > variety. We
      > > > > are yet to try it in anger but I am pretty confident.
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > Do you think you might have any problems with anchor chain fouling your
      > > > > under-deck rigging?
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > Rgds
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > Colin
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > _____
      > > > >
      > > > > From: campernicholson@yahoogroups.com
      > > > <mailto:campernicholson%40yahoogroups.com>
      > > > > [mailto:campernicholson@yahoogroups.com
      > > > <mailto:campernicholson%40yahoogroups.com>] On Behalf Of minnehaha64
      > > > > Sent: 29 April 2009 23:51
      > > > > To: campernicholson@yahoogroups.com
      > > > <mailto:campernicholson%40yahoogroups.com>
      > > > > Subject: [campernicholson] Re: Question re: fitting
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > Colin,
      > > > >
      > > > > I was considering whether it can serve as a lower attachment point for a
      > > > > length of wire that would serve as a brace to an attachment point on
      > > > deck
      > > > > for an inner forestay. I'm thinking of something like back-to-back
      > > > pad eyes,
      > > > > one above and one below, on the deck. The upper pad eye would be the
      > > > lower
      > > > > attachment for the inner forestay. Beneath that, a length of 1x19 would
      > > > > attach to the lower pad eye and run on down to that big fitting.
      > > > Highfield
      > > > > levers could make both above- and below-decks wires removable. As
      > > > long as
      > > > > the two wires were effectively "in line," much of the rigging forces
      > > > should
      > > > > be transmitted to that fitting, only minor force affecting the deck.
      > > > >
      > > > > I have submitted this idea to Joe Cooper at Hood Sails, and expect a
      > > > reply
      > > > > soon. If I'm off my rocker, said reply will be withering, since Joe
      > > > is an
      > > > > Aussie.
      > > > >
      > > > > In the list of drawings in the "files" portion of this forum, there's
      > > > > mention of a CN drawing showing the layout of an inner forestay. Has
      > > > anyone
      > > > > ever seen said drawing?
      > > > >
      > > > > Russ
      > > > >
      > > > > --- In campernicholson@ <mailto:campernicholson%40yahoogroups.com>
      > > > > yahoogroups.com, "Colin Campbell-Dunlop" <colinj@> wrote:
      > > > > >
      > > > > > It sounds to me like it might be a fitting to attach the 'bitter
      > > > end' of
      > > > > > your anchor rode.
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > > On our boat, hull 225, the fitting is much higher up so that you can
      > > > > unhook
      > > > > > it even when the anchor chain is in place so the design may have
      > > > changed
      > > > > > over the years.
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > > It is possible that I have a design drawing for one of the early
      > > > boats so
      > > > > > will have a look.
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > > What were you thinking of attaching to it?
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Rgds
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Colin
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > > _____
      > > > > >
      > > > > > From: campernicholson@ <mailto:campernicholson%40yahoogroups.com>
      > > > > yahoogroups.com
      > > > > > [mailto:campernicholson@ <mailto:campernicholson%40yahoogroups.com>
      > > > > yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of minnehaha64
      > > > > > Sent: 28 April 2009 22:45
      > > > > > To: campernicholson@ <mailto:campernicholson%40yahoogroups.com>
      > > > > yahoogroups.com
      > > > > > Subject: [campernicholson] Question re: fitting
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > > My boat is hull #99. All the way forward, inside the hull,
      > > > approximately
      > > > > at
      > > > > > the waterline, in the "v" made by the two sides meeting, embedded
      > > > in the
      > > > > > fiberglass is some sort of U-bolt or D-ring. Does anyone else have
      > > > this,
      > > > > and
      > > > > > if so, what is it? What is its intended use? Most importantly, is
      > > > it real
      > > > > > strong?
      > > > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      > > >
      > > > Spam <http://mailshield.cosmoweb.net/b.php?c=s&i=174573333&m=2f42a58a7ea0>
      > > > Not spam
      > > > <http://mailshield.cosmoweb.net/b.php?c=n&i=174573333&m=2f42a58a7ea0>
      > > > Forget previous vote
      > > > <http://mailshield.cosmoweb.net/b.php?c=f&i=174573333&m=2f42a58a7ea0>
      > >
      >
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