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4746RE: [campernicholson] Re: Question re: fitting

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  • Colin Campbell-Dunlop
    May 1, 2009
    • 0 Attachment

      Hi Russ,

       

      This is all an interesting debate and I note your point about getting the centre of effort of the storm jib as far back as possible.  In an ideal world that is what we would do.  However, as you say, compromise is the key and we are planning to get a ‘blade’ type genoa cut to run on the inner stay also.  This would give us good sail shape for upwind stuff over 25 knots or so with the option of going down to the storm jib if it gets really windy.  Our theory is that the ‘blade’ will be balanced on reef 2 of the main and the storm jib on reef three.  We have a trysail and all the kit and caboodle that goes with it but we have never had to put it up the mast. 

       

      Interesting idea re the code zero.  I would not personally want to play around with the fixing points for the forestay as it might upset the balance.  One thing I have considered though is fabricating a stainless bowsprit of about 3-4 feet in length which could be removeable.  We would fly our chute from that but it would also be an excellent fixing point for a furling type code zero or similar.  On a broad reach she would fly with that set up as it would just stop it from getting blanked by the main….is my thought. 

       

      If our sailmaker could read this he would be rubbing his hands with glee. 

       

      On another note, when funds permit I am considering a new main and genoa in Hood Vectron.  Has anyone else had sails made up in this fabric?  I am hearing lots of good things about it.  Very strong, virtually no stretch, very durable, nice to look at, excellent UV stability etc. 

       

      Rgds

       

      Colin

       

      Trutz 35/225

       


      From: campernicholson@yahoogroups.com [mailto: campernicholson@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of minnehaha64
      Sent: 01 May 2009 00:46
      To: campernicholson@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [campernicholson] Re: Question re: fitting

       




      Colin,

      My boat seems to have an inner forestay attachment point in the stemhead fitting, and there is a flange on the forward face of the mast a few inches below the top of the mast. I think these fittings are there for the installation of a " Solent " stay. The advice I've found for the storm jib and storm trysail is they be close to the mast to concentrate the center of effort. Mounting the stay a bit further aft and a bit lower down the mast accomplishes that, but it puts the lower mounting point at a less-massive section of the deck and will require running backs. Everything's a compromise.

      I've toyed with the idea of moving the forestay, along with furler and headsail back to the Solent mounting points, and installing a Code Zero ahead. Haven't run that by my rigging advisor. Will he laugh at me?

      Russ

      --- In campernicholson@ yahoogroups. com, "Colin Campbell-Dunlop" <colinj@...> wrote:

      >
      > Hi Russ,
      >
      >
      >
      > We have just put an inner forestay fitting on our boat. It is well
      forward,
      > between the windlass and about 8 inches back from the existing stay. I
      > don't know what your plans are but we found that mounting it that far
      > forward killed two birds with one stone. It is attached high enough on the
      > mast to avoid the need for running backstays and also is in a very heavily
      > constructed part of the deck. In the opinion of the yard we used and of
      the
      > surveyor who looked at it there is no need to tie in to a point in the
      hull.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > This said, the fitting is very heavy duty and has a s/s backing plate
      > underneath which is definitely of the 'no nonsense/bomb proof' variety. We
      > are yet to try it in anger but I am pretty confident.
      >
      >
      >
      > Do you think you might have any problems with anchor chain fouling your
      > under-deck rigging?
      >
      >
      >
      > Rgds
      >
      >
      >
      > Colin
      >
      >
      >
      > _____
      >
      > From: campernicholson@ yahoogroups. com
      > [mailto:campernicholson@ yahoogroups. com]
      On Behalf Of minnehaha64
      > Sent: 29 April 2009 23:51
      > To: campernicholson@ yahoogroups. com
      > Subject: [campernicholson] Re: Question re: fitting
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Colin,
      >
      > I was considering whether it can serve as a lower attachment point for a
      > length of wire that would serve as a brace to an attachment point on deck
      > for an inner forestay. I'm thinking of something like back-to-back pad
      eyes,
      > one above and one below, on the deck. The upper pad eye would be the lower
      > attachment for the inner forestay. Beneath that, a length of 1x19 would
      > attach to the lower pad eye and run on down to that big fitting. Highfield
      > levers could make both above- and below-decks wires removable. As long as
      > the two wires were effectively "in line," much of the rigging forces
      should
      > be transmitted to that fitting, only minor force affecting the deck.
      >
      > I have submitted this idea to Joe Cooper at Hood Sails, and expect a reply
      > soon. If I'm off my rocker, said reply will be withering, since Joe is an
      > Aussie.
      >
      > In the list of drawings in the "files" portion of this forum,
      there's
      > mention of a CN drawing showing the layout of an inner forestay. Has
      anyone
      > ever seen said drawing?
      >
      > Russ
      >
      > --- In campernicholson@ <mailto:campernicho lson%40yahoogrou ps.com>
      > yahoogroups. com, "Colin Campbell-Dunlop" <colinj@>
      wrote:
      > >
      > > It sounds to me like it might be a fitting to attach the 'bitter end'
      of
      > > your anchor rode.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > On our boat, hull 225, the fitting is much higher up so that you can
      > unhook
      > > it even when the anchor chain is in place so the design may have
      changed
      > > over the years.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > It is possible that I have a design drawing for one of the early
      boats so
      > > will have a look.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > What were you thinking of attaching to it?
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Rgds
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Colin
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > _____
      > >
      > > From: campernicholson@ <mailto:campernicho lson%40yahoogrou ps.com>
      > yahoogroups. com
      > > [mailto:campernicho lson@ <mailto:campernicho lson%40yahoogrou ps.com>
      > yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of minnehaha64
      > > Sent: 28 April 2009 22:45
      > > To: campernicholson@ <mailto:campernicho lson%40yahoogrou ps.com>
      > yahoogroups. com
      > > Subject: [campernicholson] Question re: fitting
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > My boat is hull #99. All the way forward, inside the hull,
      approximately
      > at
      > > the waterline, in the "v" made by the two sides meeting,
      embedded in the
      > > fiberglass is some sort of U-bolt or D-ring. Does anyone else have
      this,
      > and
      > > if so, what is it? What is its intended use? Most importantly, is it
      real
      > > strong?
      > >
      >

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