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Re: [bytesforall_readers] Re: Has the battery run out on India's $35 tablet computer? (Reuters)

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  • Edward Cherlin
    Thanks, Satish. However, I would amend your cost standard: If it costs less than decent printed textbooks, then the government should go ahead with the plan,
    Message 1 of 8 , Mar 30, 2012
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      Thanks, Satish. However, I would amend your cost standard: If it costs less than decent printed textbooks, then the government should go ahead with the plan, and also appropriate sufficient funds to support development of Open Education Resources on every subject at every level in each of the languages needed. Bangladesh has taken the first step, digitizing its existing textbooks with UNDP funding, for use with its Doel school computer. Will India be content to remain behind?

      I asked the question recently whether an XO-3 used for four years would cost more or less than existing textbooks, and got no answer. Say, Rs1500/year in the minimum configuration? Can one buy a year's worth of textbooks for Rs400? Are textbooks from India available for inspection? Then we could answer the question whether they are decent in quality. I know that many textbooks costing far more are seriously flawed.

      http://www.textbookleague.org/103feyn.htm

      Readers can judge for themselves the quality of the first publication from the Replacing Texbooks program at Sugar Labs, now in final polishing and proofreading at

      http://booki.treehouse.su/algebra-an-algorithmic-treatment/

      and

      http://booktype-demo.sourcefabric.org/algebra-an-algorithmic-treatment/_info/

      Every math statement in the book can be executed and verified.

      On Fri, Feb 24, 2012 at 15:58, Satish Jha <satish.jha@...> wrote:


      There are more than 10,000 articles, original and repeated, talking about how Aakash failed. But few have noticed. In meetings after meetings we  here that Govt is going ahead with Aakash. Just today, CII and Assocham both seemed oblivious to what is happening to it. May be because they feel the Govt is stubborn or as a senior MP told me today that Sibal believes he knows everything and defines stubbornness like few others. 

      The only impact of Aakash has been two-fold: It has derailed adoption of what is available now and for some time and jeopardised teh future of those children deprived of these opportunities over the past 5 years and it has made the idea of computer for every child finally accepted by MHRD.

      All that the MHRD has to do is to take the next step and accept the best value rather than what is the cheapest, as long as the value seems "affordable". A good rule of thumb is that if it costs as much as the mid day meal scheme to educate the children as to feed their minds, it should be fine. Investment in children's learning gets any society the highest return conceivable.

      Here are some links on Aakash that anyone using the net can find at the press of a few clicks..

      Tech News - India's $45 tablet 'Aakash' fails to click in trials | Techgig


www.techgig.com/.../India-s-45-tablet-Aakash-fails-to-click-in-trials-...India's $45 tablet 'Aakash' fails to click in trials. 33 days ago. At $45 apiece, Aakash was billed as the world's cheapest tablet PC, a device that could potentially ...

      AAKASH, WORLD'S CHEAPEST TABLET PC FAILS ... - CVB News


www.cvbnews.in/video.aspx?v=tCRGvHGBd5QNo.1 Television News Agency in South Asia. MIRRORING INDIA. AAKASH, WORLD'S CHEAPEST TABLET PC FAILS SPECIFIED STANDARDS TEST ...

       

      AAKASH, WORLD'S CHEAPEST TABLET PC FAILS SPECIFIED ...

      ► 0:52
► 0:52


      www.youtube.com/watch?v=tCRGvHGBd5Q17 Jan 2012 - 52 sec - Uploaded by cvbnews

      CVB NEWS- World's cheapest tablet PC Akash's production has been overshadowed after Ministry of ...

       

      





      Aakash-Cheapest Tablet-Government Disappoints Students ...

      ► 1:51
► 1:51


      www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bgp7WJnHyRg18 Oct 2011 - 2 min - Uploaded by suneeth1980

      Indian Govt came up with the Aakash Tablet promising it would be revolutionary, ... cheapest computer for ...

       

      



More videos for aakash fails »

      India's $45 tablet 'Aakash' fails to click in trials kapil with aakash ...


befaftech.com/?attachment_id=4826Image navigation. kapil with aakash. Published January 16, 2012 at 275 × 183 in India's $45 tablet 'Aakash' fails to click in trials · kapil with aakash ...

       

      Aakash under the weather


www.akashtabletubislate.in/aakash-weather/
27 Jan 2012 – Last week, the reports from the trial of the first batch of Aakash came in. According to news, Aakash failed to impress students. The reports said ...

       

      Aakash Tablet PC Poor Service & Disappointing Performance ...


www.coolpctips.com/.../aakash-tablet-pc-poor-service-disappointing- ...
13 Jan 2012 – Do you think Aakash Tablet Failed to keep their promise ? Aakash, the world's cheapest tablet is now the world's cheapest customer service.

       

      Reasons Why The Cheapest Tablet Aakash Failed Miserably [Must ...


www.dreambloggers.com/reasons-why-the-cheapest-tablet-aakash-fai...
11 Jan 2012 – you are right I am talking about” Aakash” which has already created a buzz in the market because of it's massive booking.

       

      AAKASH, WORLD'S CHEAPEST TABLET PC FAILS SPECIFIED ...


thetabletsreview.com/aakash-worlds-cheapest-tablet-pc-fails-specified...
9 Feb 2012 – AAKASH, TABLET PC, CHEAPEST TABLET PC, WORLD'S CHEAPEST TAB, TOUCH SCREEN, GADGET, IT, TECH, COMPUTER GADGETS, ...

      Why Aakash Tablet is a big fail ?


www.xiontechinfo.com/.../why-aakash-tablet-i... - United States

       

      by Rishiraj Sisodia

      9 Feb 2012 – Aakash,the world's cheapest Tablet by Indians has finally been in the market for 3Months .The Aakash is one of the cheapest tablet yet ...

       

      Aakash fails to touch the sky of expectation: Review - Technology ...


digg.com/.../aakash_fails_to_touch_the_sky_of_expectation_review_ ...India proudly presented Aakash as a cheapest tablet. This tablet works on android platform 2.2 Froyo. This tablet costs only $35 (RS 1700 approx) and is.

       

      The inefficiency of 'economy' - Play - livemint.com


www.livemint.com/2012/01/.../The-inefficiency-of-8216eco.html
13 Jan 2012 – The Aakash, however, falls short even of this. Its design and construction fail to impress. The on-screen keyboard is a painful experience, and ...

       

       


      2012/2/24 Frederick FN Noronha फ्रेड्रिक नोरोन्या *فريدريك نورونيا <fredericknoronha@...>
       

      Has the battery run out on India's $35 tablet computer?

      By Frank Jack Daniel
      NEW DELHI | Wed Feb 22, 2012 4:32am EST

      (Reuters) - A "$35" computer launched last year in India as the
      world's cheapest tablet has run into problems and companies will be
      invited to bid again to make the device after complaints of poor
      performance and hiccups rolling out a pilot model.

      The government has hailed the Aakash tablet as an achievement of
      Indian frugal engineering that would end the digital divide in a
      country where only one in every 10 of its 1.2 billion people use the
      Internet.

      Products such as Apple Inc's iPad are beyond the reach even of many in
      the fast-growing middle class. The locally assembled machine has a
      cost price of around $50 and was to be sold to students by the
      government for $35.

      But only 10,000 units have been shipped since October. The
      relationship between the device's manufacturer, DataWind, and a
      government research institute soured amid complaints by test users
      that the processor was too slow, the battery life short and the
      resistive touch screen hard to use.

      The government's Human Resource Development Ministry is due to launch
      a new tender in the next few weeks to seek partners to build the
      tablet - a process that could see DataWind dropped.

      "It is not automatic that because you have done phase one you will do
      phase two," said a senior official at the ministry with direct
      knowledge of the project.

      Datawind won a contract last year to make 100,000 units for the
      government and it was thought likely it would make the additional 1
      million units called for in the second phase of production. But it had
      lost its first-mover advantage and would face renewed competition for
      the contract, the official said.

      "The feeling is that sufficient interest has been generated to get
      better specifications at the same or a lower price," added the
      official, who declined to be named.

      A small London-based company, DataWind developed the tablet with the
      Indian Institute of Technology. The company said the institute had
      changed the specifications late last year and now wanted a device that
      could meet U.S. military durability requirement for the same
      rock-bottom price.

      "Among other things that requires the device to take 4 inches an hour
      of sustained rain," DataWind CEO Suneet Singh told Reuters.

      "We objected to it and the project has been on hold since then, we are
      working with the ministry to get that resolved," Singh said after
      meeting with ministry officials in New Delhi on Tuesday.

      India has a reputation for creating affordable products that are easy
      to use and sturdy enough to handle its rugged environment -- from Tata
      Motors' $2,000 Nano car to generic versions of pharmaceuticals.

      But despite being a leader in software and IT services, India trails
      fellow BRIC nations Brazil, Russia and China in the drive to get the
      masses connected to the Internet and mobile phones, a report by risk
      analysis firm Maplecroft said last year.

      The number of Internet users grew 15-fold between 2000 and 2010 in
      India, according to another report. Still, just 8 percent of Indians
      have access. That compares with nearly 40 percent in China.

      The Aakash is aimed at university students for digital learning via a
      government platform that distributes electronic books and courses.

      DataWind says it is receiving tens of thousands of orders daily for a
      commercial version of the tablet with a built-in GPRS modem that is
      due to be launched this month for 2,999 rupees ($61).

      (Editing by John Chalmers)

      http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/02/22/us-india-tablet-idUSTRE81L0G320120222
      --
      FN +91-832-2409490 or +91-9822122436 fn@...
      Books from Goa,1556 http://scr.bi/Goa1556Books
      Audio recordings (mostly from Goa): http://bit.ly/GoaRecordings




      --
      Satish Jha 
      T: 301 841 7422
      F: 301 560 4909 
      ________________
       






      --
      Edward Mokurai (默雷/निशब्दगर्ज/نشبدگرج) Cherlin
      Silent Thunder is my name, and Children are my nation.
      The Cosmos is my dwelling place, the Truth my destination.
      http://wiki.sugarlabs.org/go/Replacing_Textbooks
    • Satish Jha
      Ed, You are talking logically. India s Ministry of Education called MHRD does not understand that. It understands at the level of the intelligence and the
      Message 2 of 8 , Mar 30, 2012
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      • 0 Attachment
        Ed, You are talking logically. India's Ministry of Education called MHRD does not understand that. It understands at the level of the intelligence and the experience of someone sitting on the seat that decides. That person, no matter who he or she is, has little interest in India's poor beyond what "the Government" wants. Who is the government, then? Anyone who can issue the order. There must be someone at the top? There is no one. Asked the Prime Minister. The Education Minister did just the opposite. Ask the Education Minister, he will ask his Joint Secretary. Why did they make one decision over the other? Logic will fail to explain anything. Or may be they will say we do not understand their logic. Because it is very hard to understand when you have been an ombudsman of the system when you were young and did not want to understand corruption.

        So program are not made because there is a rationale. They are made because who will benefit and what is in it for the guy behind the power desk. 

        You think we have a problem at the level of an idea? Yes, OLPC principles do not respect market. They "expect" the governments actually work in the interest of their people. Unfortunately, governments work in the interest of those who can create an interest in the governments to have an interest in them.

        Coming to the numbers: India's text books cost way less for the village schools. They are given free. They may or may not reach. But the text books, like mid-day meals, are designed for those who make them and sell them. Not for learning. If you see them, you will be transported to another century. 

        On Fri, Mar 30, 2012 at 8:37 PM, Edward Cherlin <echerlin@...> wrote:
         

        Thanks, Satish. However, I would amend your cost standard: If it costs less than decent printed textbooks, then the government should go ahead with the plan, and also appropriate sufficient funds to support development of Open Education Resources on every subject at every level in each of the languages needed. Bangladesh has taken the first step, digitizing its existing textbooks with UNDP funding, for use with its Doel school computer. Will India be content to remain behind?

        I asked the question recently whether an XO-3 used for four years would cost more or less than existing textbooks, and got no answer. Say, Rs1500/year in the minimum configuration? Can one buy a year's worth of textbooks for Rs400? Are textbooks from India available for inspection? Then we could answer the question whether they are decent in quality. I know that many textbooks costing far more are seriously flawed.

        http://www.textbookleague.org/103feyn.htm

        Readers can judge for themselves the quality of the first publication from the Replacing Texbooks program at Sugar Labs, now in final polishing and proofreading at

        http://booki.treehouse.su/algebra-an-algorithmic-treatment/

        and

        http://booktype-demo.sourcefabric.org/algebra-an-algorithmic-treatment/_info/

        Every math statement in the book can be executed and verified.

        On Fri, Feb 24, 2012 at 15:58, Satish Jha <satish.jha@...> wrote:


        There are more than 10,000 articles, original and repeated, talking about how Aakash failed. But few have noticed. In meetings after meetings we  here that Govt is going ahead with Aakash. Just today, CII and Assocham both seemed oblivious to what is happening to it. May be because they feel the Govt is stubborn or as a senior MP told me today that Sibal believes he knows everything and defines stubbornness like few others. 

        The only impact of Aakash has been two-fold: It has derailed adoption of what is available now and for some time and jeopardised teh future of those children deprived of these opportunities over the past 5 years and it has made the idea of computer for every child finally accepted by MHRD.

        All that the MHRD has to do is to take the next step and accept the best value rather than what is the cheapest, as long as the value seems "affordable". A good rule of thumb is that if it costs as much as the mid day meal scheme to educate the children as to feed their minds, it should be fine. Investment in children's learning gets any society the highest return conceivable.

        Here are some links on Aakash that anyone using the net can find at the press of a few clicks..

        Tech News - India's $45 tablet 'Aakash' fails to click in trials | Techgig


www.techgig.com/.../India-s-45-tablet-Aakash-fails-to-click-in-trials-...India's $45 tablet 'Aakash' fails to click in trials. 33 days ago. At $45 apiece, Aakash was billed as the world's cheapest tablet PC, a device that could potentially ...

        AAKASH, WORLD'S CHEAPEST TABLET PC FAILS ... - CVB News


www.cvbnews.in/video.aspx?v=tCRGvHGBd5QNo.1 Television News Agency in South Asia. MIRRORING INDIA. AAKASH, WORLD'S CHEAPEST TABLET PC FAILS SPECIFIED STANDARDS TEST ...

         

        AAKASH, WORLD'S CHEAPEST TABLET PC FAILS SPECIFIED ...

        ► 0:52
► 0:52


        www.youtube.com/watch?v=tCRGvHGBd5Q17 Jan 2012 - 52 sec - Uploaded by cvbnews

        CVB NEWS- World's cheapest tablet PC Akash's production has been overshadowed after Ministry of ...

         

        





        Aakash-Cheapest Tablet-Government Disappoints Students ...

        ► 1:51
► 1:51


        www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bgp7WJnHyRg18 Oct 2011 - 2 min - Uploaded by suneeth1980

        Indian Govt came up with the Aakash Tablet promising it would be revolutionary, ... cheapest computer for ...

         

        



More videos for aakash fails »

        India's $45 tablet 'Aakash' fails to click in trials kapil with aakash ...


befaftech.com/?attachment_id=4826Image navigation. kapil with aakash. Published January 16, 2012 at 275 × 183 in India's $45 tablet 'Aakash' fails to click in trials · kapil with aakash ...

         

        Aakash under the weather


www.akashtabletubislate.in/aakash-weather/
27 Jan 2012 – Last week, the reports from the trial of the first batch of Aakash came in. According to news, Aakash failed to impress students. The reports said ...

         

        Aakash Tablet PC Poor Service & Disappointing Performance ...


www.coolpctips.com/.../aakash-tablet-pc-poor-service-disappointing- ...
13 Jan 2012 – Do you think Aakash Tablet Failed to keep their promise ? Aakash, the world's cheapest tablet is now the world's cheapest customer service.

         

        Reasons Why The Cheapest Tablet Aakash Failed Miserably [Must ...


www.dreambloggers.com/reasons-why-the-cheapest-tablet-aakash-fai...
11 Jan 2012 – you are right I am talking about” Aakash” which has already created a buzz in the market because of it's massive booking.

         

        AAKASH, WORLD'S CHEAPEST TABLET PC FAILS SPECIFIED ...


thetabletsreview.com/aakash-worlds-cheapest-tablet-pc-fails-specified...
9 Feb 2012 – AAKASH, TABLET PC, CHEAPEST TABLET PC, WORLD'S CHEAPEST TAB, TOUCH SCREEN, GADGET, IT, TECH, COMPUTER GADGETS, ...

        Why Aakash Tablet is a big fail ?


www.xiontechinfo.com/.../why-aakash-tablet-i... - United States

         

        by Rishiraj Sisodia

        9 Feb 2012 – Aakash,the world's cheapest Tablet by Indians has finally been in the market for 3Months .The Aakash is one of the cheapest tablet yet ...

         

        Aakash fails to touch the sky of expectation: Review - Technology ...


digg.com/.../aakash_fails_to_touch_the_sky_of_expectation_review_ ...India proudly presented Aakash as a cheapest tablet. This tablet works on android platform 2.2 Froyo. This tablet costs only $35 (RS 1700 approx) and is.

         

        The inefficiency of 'economy' - Play - livemint.com


www.livemint.com/2012/01/.../The-inefficiency-of-8216eco.html
13 Jan 2012 – The Aakash, however, falls short even of this. Its design and construction fail to impress. The on-screen keyboard is a painful experience, and ...

         

         


        2012/2/24 Frederick FN Noronha फ्रेड्रिक नोरोन्या *فريدريك نورونيا <fredericknoronha@...>
         

        Has the battery run out on India's $35 tablet computer?

        By Frank Jack Daniel
        NEW DELHI | Wed Feb 22, 2012 4:32am EST

        (Reuters) - A "$35" computer launched last year in India as the
        world's cheapest tablet has run into problems and companies will be
        invited to bid again to make the device after complaints of poor
        performance and hiccups rolling out a pilot model.

        The government has hailed the Aakash tablet as an achievement of
        Indian frugal engineering that would end the digital divide in a
        country where only one in every 10 of its 1.2 billion people use the
        Internet.

        Products such as Apple Inc's iPad are beyond the reach even of many in
        the fast-growing middle class. The locally assembled machine has a
        cost price of around $50 and was to be sold to students by the
        government for $35.

        But only 10,000 units have been shipped since October. The
        relationship between the device's manufacturer, DataWind, and a
        government research institute soured amid complaints by test users
        that the processor was too slow, the battery life short and the
        resistive touch screen hard to use.

        The government's Human Resource Development Ministry is due to launch
        a new tender in the next few weeks to seek partners to build the
        tablet - a process that could see DataWind dropped.

        "It is not automatic that because you have done phase one you will do
        phase two," said a senior official at the ministry with direct
        knowledge of the project.

        Datawind won a contract last year to make 100,000 units for the
        government and it was thought likely it would make the additional 1
        million units called for in the second phase of production. But it had
        lost its first-mover advantage and would face renewed competition for
        the contract, the official said.

        "The feeling is that sufficient interest has been generated to get
        better specifications at the same or a lower price," added the
        official, who declined to be named.

        A small London-based company, DataWind developed the tablet with the
        Indian Institute of Technology. The company said the institute had
        changed the specifications late last year and now wanted a device that
        could meet U.S. military durability requirement for the same
        rock-bottom price.

        "Among other things that requires the device to take 4 inches an hour
        of sustained rain," DataWind CEO Suneet Singh told Reuters.

        "We objected to it and the project has been on hold since then, we are
        working with the ministry to get that resolved," Singh said after
        meeting with ministry officials in New Delhi on Tuesday.

        India has a reputation for creating affordable products that are easy
        to use and sturdy enough to handle its rugged environment -- from Tata
        Motors' $2,000 Nano car to generic versions of pharmaceuticals.

        But despite being a leader in software and IT services, India trails
        fellow BRIC nations Brazil, Russia and China in the drive to get the
        masses connected to the Internet and mobile phones, a report by risk
        analysis firm Maplecroft said last year.

        The number of Internet users grew 15-fold between 2000 and 2010 in
        India, according to another report. Still, just 8 percent of Indians
        have access. That compares with nearly 40 percent in China.

        The Aakash is aimed at university students for digital learning via a
        government platform that distributes electronic books and courses.

        DataWind says it is receiving tens of thousands of orders daily for a
        commercial version of the tablet with a built-in GPRS modem that is
        due to be launched this month for 2,999 rupees ($61).

        (Editing by John Chalmers)

        http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/02/22/us-india-tablet-idUSTRE81L0G320120222
        --
        FN +91-832-2409490 or +91-9822122436 fn@...
        Books from Goa,1556 http://scr.bi/Goa1556Books
        Audio recordings (mostly from Goa): http://bit.ly/GoaRecordings




        --
        Satish Jha 
        T: 301 841 7422
        F: 301 560 4909 
        ________________
         






        --
        Edward Mokurai (默雷/निशब्दगर्ज/نشبدگرج) Cherlin
        Silent Thunder is my name, and Children are my nation.
        The Cosmos is my dwelling place, the Truth my destination.
        http://wiki.sugarlabs.org/go/Replacing_Textbooks




        --
        Satish Jha 
        T: 301 841 7422
        F: 301 560 4909 
        ________________
         

      • Edward Cherlin
        ... Thank you. ... My understanding is that the Government of India understands at the level of the British Raj, which was responsible for making the caste
        Message 3 of 8 , Mar 31, 2012
        View Source
        • 0 Attachment
          On Fri, Mar 30, 2012 at 21:46, Satish Jha <satish.jha@...> wrote:
          >
          > Ed, You are talking logically.

          Thank you.

          > India's Ministry of Education called MHRD does not understand that. It understands at the level of the intelligence and the experience of someone sitting on the seat that decides.

          My understanding is that the Government of India understands at the
          level of the British Raj, which was responsible for making the caste
          system in India what we know today, by forcing it to ape the British
          class system and giving it the force of law.

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Indian_caste_system#British_rule

          The economic theory of the British Empire worldwide was that it
          existed to enrich the home country, regardless of any effects on
          colonists or colonized elsewhere. This includes Warren Hastings and
          the British East India Company causing famine in Bengal. Thus the
          acquittal of Hastings at his impeachment trial, of which Edmund Burke,
          the prosecutor, said, "Resolved to die in the last dike of
          prevarication."

          Burke used to be known as the Father of Conservatism, but today he is
          just another Tax and Spend Liberal to the Republican Party in the US.

          http://www.dailykos.com/story/2009/09/06/777952/-Conservatives-Endangered-species-

          "Mere parsimony is not economy. Expense, and great expense, may be an
          essential part in true economy. Economy is a distributive virtue, and
          consists not in saving but selection. Parsimony requires no
          providence, no sagacity, no powers of combination, no comparison, no
          judgment."

          Thus, to return to the Empire, the American Revolution two centuries
          ago equally with Gandhi in the 20th century.

          > That person, no matter who he or she is, has little interest in India's poor beyond what "the Government" wants. Who is the government, then? Anyone who can issue the order. There must be someone at the top? There is no one. Asked the Prime Minister. The Education Minister did just the opposite. Ask the Education Minister, he will ask his Joint Secretary. Why did they make one decision over the other? Logic will fail to explain anything. Or may be they will say we do not understand their logic. Because it is very hard to understand when you have been an ombudsman of the system when you were young and did not want to understand corruption.

          "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary
          depends upon his not understanding it."

          I, Candidate for Governor: And How I Got Licked (1935), by Upton Sinclair

          > So program are not made because there is a rationale. They are made because who will benefit and what is in it for the guy behind the power desk.
          >
          > You think we have a problem at the level of an idea? Yes, OLPC principles do not respect market. They "expect" the governments actually work in the interest of their people. Unfortunately, governments work in the interest of those who can create an interest in the governments to have an interest in them.
          >
          > Coming to the numbers: India's text books cost way less for the village schools.

          Do they cost less than Rs400 to _produce_? For an entire school year?
          Arithmetic, social studies, local language, English, science...?

          > They are given free. They may or may not reach. But the text books, like mid-day meals, are designed for those who make them and sell them. Not for learning. If you see them, you will be transported to another century.

          Can an educational NGO get free copies?

          Compare the free digital textbooks in Bangla from Bangladesh that
          anybody can download.

          http://www.infokosh.bangladesh.gov.bd/
          http://www.priyo.com/tech/2011/02/28/pm-opens-e-content-repository-20905.html
          http://www.ebook.gov.bd/ e-Book ::. ই-বুক জগতে স্বাগতম
          http://www.priyo.com/tech/2011/04/24/pm-opens-online-version-textbo-24355.html

          Can we talk about them to West Bengal?

          > On Fri, Mar 30, 2012 at 8:37 PM, Edward Cherlin <echerlin@...> wrote:
          >>
          >> Thanks, Satish. However, I would amend your cost standard: If it costs less than decent printed textbooks, then the government should go ahead with the plan, and also appropriate sufficient funds to support development of Open Education Resources on every subject at every level in each of the languages needed. Bangladesh has taken the first step, digitizing its existing textbooks with UNDP funding, for use with its Doel school computer. Will India be content to remain behind?
          >>
          >> I asked the question recently whether an XO-3 used for four years would cost more or less than existing textbooks, and got no answer. Say, Rs1500/year in the minimum configuration? Can one buy a year's worth of textbooks for Rs400? Are textbooks from India available for inspection? Then we could answer the question whether they are decent in quality. I know that many textbooks costing far more are seriously flawed.
          >>
          >> http://www.textbookleague.org/103feyn.htm
          >>
          >> Readers can judge for themselves the quality of the first publication from the Replacing Texbooks program at Sugar Labs, now in final polishing and proofreading at
          >>
          >> http://booki.treehouse.su/algebra-an-algorithmic-treatment/
          >>
          >> and
          >>
          >> http://booktype-demo.sourcefabric.org/algebra-an-algorithmic-treatment/_info/
          >>
          >> Every math statement in the book can be executed and verified.
          >>
          >> On Fri, Feb 24, 2012 at 15:58, Satish Jha <satish.jha@...> wrote:
          >>>
          >>>
          >>>
          >>> There are more than 10,000 articles, original and repeated, talking about how Aakash failed. But few have noticed. In meetings after meetings we  here that Govt is going ahead with Aakash. Just today, CII and Assocham both seemed oblivious to what is happening to it. May be because they feel the Govt is stubborn or as a senior MP told me today that Sibal believes he knows everything and defines stubbornness like few others.
          >>>
          >>> The only impact of Aakash has been two-fold: It has derailed adoption of what is available now and for some time and jeopardised teh future of those children deprived of these opportunities over the past 5 years and it has made the idea of computer for every child finally accepted by MHRD.
          >>>
          >>> All that the MHRD has to do is to take the next step and accept the best value rather than what is the cheapest, as long as the value seems "affordable". A good rule of thumb is that if it costs as much as the mid day meal scheme to educate the children as to feed their minds, it should be fine. Investment in children's learning gets any society the highest return conceivable.
          >>>
          >>> Here are some links on Aakash that anyone using the net can find at the press of a few clicks..
          >>>
          >>> Tech News - India's $45 tablet 'Aakash' fails to click in trials | Techgig



www.techgig.com/.../India-s-45-tablet-Aakash-fails-to-click-in-trials-...
India's $45 tablet 'Aakash' fails to click in trials. 33 days ago. At $45 apiece, Aakash was billed as the world's cheapest tablet PC, a device that could potentially ...
          >>>
          >>> AAKASH, WORLD'S CHEAPEST TABLET PC FAILS ... - CVB News



www.cvbnews.in/video.aspx?v=tCRGvHGBd5Q
No.1 Television News Agency in South Asia. MIRRORING INDIA. AAKASH, WORLD'S CHEAPEST TABLET PC FAILS SPECIFIED STANDARDS TEST ...
          >>>
          >>>
          >>>
          >>> AAKASH, WORLD'S CHEAPEST TABLET PC FAILS SPECIFIED ...
          >>>
          >>> 
► 0:52
► 0:52
          >>>
          >>> www.youtube.com/watch?v=tCRGvHGBd5Q
17 Jan 2012 - 52 sec - Uploaded by cvbnews
          >>>
          >>> CVB NEWS- World's cheapest tablet PC Akash's production has been overshadowed after Ministry of ...
          >>>
          >>>
          >>>
          >>>
          >>>
          >>> Aakash-Cheapest Tablet-Government Disappoints Students ...
          >>>
          >>> 
► 1:51
► 1:51
          >>>
          >>> www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bgp7WJnHyRg
18 Oct 2011 - 2 min - Uploaded by suneeth1980
          >>>
          >>> Indian Govt came up with the Aakash Tablet promising it would be revolutionary, ... cheapest computer for ...
          >>>
          >>>
          >>>
          >>> 



More videos for aakash fails »
          >>>
          >>> India's $45 tablet 'Aakash' fails to click in trials kapil with aakash ...



befaftech.com/?attachment_id=4826
Image navigation. kapil with aakash. Published January 16, 2012 at 275 × 183 in India's $45 tablet 'Aakash' fails to click in trials · kapil with aakash ...
          >>>
          >>>
          >>>
          >>> Aakash under the weather



www.akashtabletubislate.in/aakash-weather/
27 Jan 2012 – Last week, the reports from the trial of the first batch of Aakash came in. According to news, Aakash failed to impress students. The reports said ...
          >>>
          >>>
          >>>
          >>> Aakash Tablet PC Poor Service & Disappointing Performance ...



www.coolpctips.com/.../aakash-tablet-pc-poor-service-disappointing- ...
13 Jan 2012 – Do you think Aakash Tablet Failed to keep their promise ? Aakash, the world's cheapest tablet is now the world's cheapest customer service.
          >>>
          >>>
          >>>
          >>> Reasons Why The Cheapest Tablet Aakash Failed Miserably [Must ...



www.dreambloggers.com/reasons-why-the-cheapest-tablet-aakash-fai...
11 Jan 2012 – you are right I am talking about” Aakash” which has already created a buzz in the market because of it's massive booking.
          >>>
          >>>
          >>>
          >>> AAKASH, WORLD'S CHEAPEST TABLET PC FAILS SPECIFIED ...



thetabletsreview.com/aakash-worlds-cheapest-tablet-pc-fails-specified...
9 Feb 2012 – AAKASH, TABLET PC, CHEAPEST TABLET PC, WORLD'S CHEAPEST TAB, TOUCH SCREEN, GADGET, IT, TECH, COMPUTER GADGETS, ...
          >>>
          >>> Why Aakash Tablet is a big fail ?



www.xiontechinfo.com/.../why-aakash-tablet-i... - United States
          >>>
          >>>
          >>>
          >>> by Rishiraj Sisodia
          >>>
          >>> 
9 Feb 2012 – Aakash,the world's cheapest Tablet by Indians has finally been in the market for 3Months .The Aakash is one of the cheapest tablet yet ...
          >>>
          >>>
          >>>
          >>> Aakash fails to touch the sky of expectation: Review - Technology ...



digg.com/.../aakash_fails_to_touch_the_sky_of_expectation_review_ ...
India proudly presented Aakash as a cheapest tablet. This tablet works on android platform 2.2 Froyo. This tablet costs only $35 (RS 1700 approx) and is.
          >>>
          >>>
          >>>
          >>> The inefficiency of 'economy' - Play - livemint.com



www.livemint.com/2012/01/.../The-inefficiency-of-8216eco.html
13 Jan 2012 – The Aakash, however, falls short even of this. Its design and construction fail to impress. The on-screen keyboard is a painful experience, and ...
          >>>
          >>>
          >>>
          >>>
          >>>
          >>>
          >>> 2012/2/24 Frederick FN Noronha फ्रेड्रिक नोरोन्या *فريدريك نورونيا <fredericknoronha@...>
          >>>>
          >>>>
          >>>>
          >>>> Has the battery run out on India's $35 tablet computer?
          >>>>
          >>>> By Frank Jack Daniel
          >>>> NEW DELHI | Wed Feb 22, 2012 4:32am EST
          >>>>
          >>>> (Reuters) - A "$35" computer launched last year in India as the
          >>>> world's cheapest tablet has run into problems and companies will be
          >>>> invited to bid again to make the device after complaints of poor
          >>>> performance and hiccups rolling out a pilot model.
          >>>>
          >>>> The government has hailed the Aakash tablet as an achievement of
          >>>> Indian frugal engineering that would end the digital divide in a
          >>>> country where only one in every 10 of its 1.2 billion people use the
          >>>> Internet.
          >>>>
          >>>> Products such as Apple Inc's iPad are beyond the reach even of many in
          >>>> the fast-growing middle class. The locally assembled machine has a
          >>>> cost price of around $50 and was to be sold to students by the
          >>>> government for $35.
          >>>>
          >>>> But only 10,000 units have been shipped since October. The
          >>>> relationship between the device's manufacturer, DataWind, and a
          >>>> government research institute soured amid complaints by test users
          >>>> that the processor was too slow, the battery life short and the
          >>>> resistive touch screen hard to use.
          >>>>
          >>>> The government's Human Resource Development Ministry is due to launch
          >>>> a new tender in the next few weeks to seek partners to build the
          >>>> tablet - a process that could see DataWind dropped.
          >>>>
          >>>> "It is not automatic that because you have done phase one you will do
          >>>> phase two," said a senior official at the ministry with direct
          >>>> knowledge of the project.
          >>>>
          >>>> Datawind won a contract last year to make 100,000 units for the
          >>>> government and it was thought likely it would make the additional 1
          >>>> million units called for in the second phase of production. But it had
          >>>> lost its first-mover advantage and would face renewed competition for
          >>>> the contract, the official said.
          >>>>
          >>>> "The feeling is that sufficient interest has been generated to get
          >>>> better specifications at the same or a lower price," added the
          >>>> official, who declined to be named.
          >>>>
          >>>> A small London-based company, DataWind developed the tablet with the
          >>>> Indian Institute of Technology. The company said the institute had
          >>>> changed the specifications late last year and now wanted a device that
          >>>> could meet U.S. military durability requirement for the same
          >>>> rock-bottom price.
          >>>>
          >>>> "Among other things that requires the device to take 4 inches an hour
          >>>> of sustained rain," DataWind CEO Suneet Singh told Reuters.
          >>>>
          >>>> "We objected to it and the project has been on hold since then, we are
          >>>> working with the ministry to get that resolved," Singh said after
          >>>> meeting with ministry officials in New Delhi on Tuesday.
          >>>>
          >>>> India has a reputation for creating affordable products that are easy
          >>>> to use and sturdy enough to handle its rugged environment -- from Tata
          >>>> Motors' $2,000 Nano car to generic versions of pharmaceuticals.
          >>>>
          >>>> But despite being a leader in software and IT services, India trails
          >>>> fellow BRIC nations Brazil, Russia and China in the drive to get the
          >>>> masses connected to the Internet and mobile phones, a report by risk
          >>>> analysis firm Maplecroft said last year.
          >>>>
          >>>> The number of Internet users grew 15-fold between 2000 and 2010 in
          >>>> India, according to another report. Still, just 8 percent of Indians
          >>>> have access. That compares with nearly 40 percent in China.
          >>>>
          >>>> The Aakash is aimed at university students for digital learning via a
          >>>> government platform that distributes electronic books and courses.
          >>>>
          >>>> DataWind says it is receiving tens of thousands of orders daily for a
          >>>> commercial version of the tablet with a built-in GPRS modem that is
          >>>> due to be launched this month for 2,999 rupees ($61).
          >>>>
          >>>> (Editing by John Chalmers)
          >>>>
          >>>> http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/02/22/us-india-tablet-idUSTRE81L0G320120222
          >>>> --
          >>>> FN +91-832-2409490 or +91-9822122436 fn@...
          >>>> Books from Goa,1556 http://scr.bi/Goa1556Books
          >>>> Audio recordings (mostly from Goa): http://bit.ly/GoaRecordings
          >>>
          >>>
          >>>
          >>>
          >>> --
          >>> Satish Jha
          >>> T: 301 841 7422
          >>> F: 301 560 4909
          >>> ________________
          >>>
          >>>
          >>>
          >>>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >> --
          >> Edward Mokurai (默雷/निशब्दगर्ज/نشبدگرج) Cherlin
          >> Silent Thunder is my name, and Children are my nation.
          >> The Cosmos is my dwelling place, the Truth my destination.
          >> http://wiki.sugarlabs.org/go/Replacing_Textbooks
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > --
          > Satish Jha
          > T: 301 841 7422
          > F: 301 560 4909
          > ________________
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >




          --
          Edward Mokurai (默雷/निशब्दगर्ज/نشبدگرج) Cherlin
          Silent Thunder is my name, and Children are my nation.
          The Cosmos is my dwelling place, the Truth my destination.
          http://wiki.sugarlabs.org/go/Replacing_Textbooks
        • Satish Jha
          We do not know the price of the OLPC tablet or XO 3 yet. So its hard to say anything about how cost effective it will be. But the cost of books in India for a
          Message 4 of 8 , Apr 1 6:55 PM
          View Source
          • 0 Attachment
            We do not know the price of the OLPC tablet or XO 3 yet. So its hard to say anything about how cost effective it will be.

            But the cost of books in India for a year do not go beyond Rs 500- frugal approach to printing on cheap paper and bulk orders and poor binding etc- per annum. Middle level will still be under Rs 1000 per annum and unlikely to go beyond Rs 1500 in higher grades in government schools.

            I am not looking at the private schools here.

            So presuming we take a 5 year cost, Rs 2500 for primary and less than Rs 5000 for the next level for 5 year period should be the cost of books.

            Then again, if people have to pay upfront, then they may not look at it as an option at all.

            The Governments DO NOT think logically. One Chief Minister told me OLPC is free for me because it saves electricity worth more than its costs. But his bureaucracy is waiting for something to act on the understanding of the Chief Minister.

            OLPC is free many times over for anyone who can count and think. But the way things are, it is portrayed as expensive because a hoax (what else will anyone call it anywhere else? But the government ministers have a right to fool the nation, ordinary folks are accountable and need to use civil language) called Aakash has created an impression that Indians can have a computer for $10 and if not that may be $35 and if not that may be $50 and there is little to show there. Its a true vapourware, if there was one.

            In other words, its not how free it actually is. Its how the government and the market want to see it. Just the other day a company called wishtel (the name says a lot for India as well), with no record of ever having produced anything before and just some connection with a key government functionary launched another "tablet" for $80 with a resistive screen just so they can sell cheaply to the government.

            A government focused on cheap now, pay later without getting any value cannot understand how to plan or purchase something of real value. 

            Aakash has eclipsed OLPC from the minds of most. Save a few I am in touch with or those who go out of their way to undersatnd what is happening in the world. I get greeted and complemented for doing "Aakash" and I say that we do "Aakash 9" while most others are busy with Aakash 1 or 2.

            To take the ONLY viable answer I see to help quality education reach India's village requires the following:

            1: An organisation that can sustain the interaction with the governments
            2: A strategy that allows the legislators to see the meaning of OLPC in their backyards, in villages a few miles from where the legislature meets in each state or some key states- by creating sizable demonstration sites as they will NOT go to Uruguay, or even Mumbai, to see them.
            3: Create a delivery model that helps the schools and teachers derive visible value, visible the way they want to see it, including training the teachers, maintain the hardware, offer periodic support in understanding various sugar applications etc

            As things succeed, everyone will come around. There will be naysayers, vested interests and others who prefer other options but every village child may have an opportunity to learn as best as they can what little they have.

            On Fri, Mar 30, 2012 at 8:37 PM, Edward Cherlin <echerlin@...> wrote:
             

            Thanks, Satish. However, I would amend your cost standard: If it costs less than decent printed textbooks, then the government should go ahead with the plan, and also appropriate sufficient funds to support development of Open Education Resources on every subject at every level in each of the languages needed. Bangladesh has taken the first step, digitizing its existing textbooks with UNDP funding, for use with its Doel school computer. Will India be content to remain behind?

            I asked the question recently whether an XO-3 used for four years would cost more or less than existing textbooks, and got no answer. Say, Rs1500/year in the minimum configuration? Can one buy a year's worth of textbooks for Rs400? Are textbooks from India available for inspection? Then we could answer the question whether they are decent in quality. I know that many textbooks costing far more are seriously flawed.

            http://www.textbookleague.org/103feyn.htm

            Readers can judge for themselves the quality of the first publication from the Replacing Texbooks program at Sugar Labs, now in final polishing and proofreading at

            http://booki.treehouse.su/algebra-an-algorithmic-treatment/

            and

            http://booktype-demo.sourcefabric.org/algebra-an-algorithmic-treatment/_info/

            Every math statement in the book can be executed and verified.

            On Fri, Feb 24, 2012 at 15:58, Satish Jha <satish.jha@...> wrote:


            There are more than 10,000 articles, original and repeated, talking about how Aakash failed. But few have noticed. In meetings after meetings we  here that Govt is going ahead with Aakash. Just today, CII and Assocham both seemed oblivious to what is happening to it. May be because they feel the Govt is stubborn or as a senior MP told me today that Sibal believes he knows everything and defines stubbornness like few others. 

            The only impact of Aakash has been two-fold: It has derailed adoption of what is available now and for some time and jeopardised teh future of those children deprived of these opportunities over the past 5 years and it has made the idea of computer for every child finally accepted by MHRD.

            All that the MHRD has to do is to take the next step and accept the best value rather than what is the cheapest, as long as the value seems "affordable". A good rule of thumb is that if it costs as much as the mid day meal scheme to educate the children as to feed their minds, it should be fine. Investment in children's learning gets any society the highest return conceivable.

            Here are some links on Aakash that anyone using the net can find at the press of a few clicks..

            Tech News - India's $45 tablet 'Aakash' fails to click in trials | Techgig


www.techgig.com/.../India-s-45-tablet-Aakash-fails-to-click-in-trials-...India's $45 tablet 'Aakash' fails to click in trials. 33 days ago. At $45 apiece, Aakash was billed as the world's cheapest tablet PC, a device that could potentially ...

            AAKASH, WORLD'S CHEAPEST TABLET PC FAILS ... - CVB News


www.cvbnews.in/video.aspx?v=tCRGvHGBd5QNo.1 Television News Agency in South Asia. MIRRORING INDIA. AAKASH, WORLD'S CHEAPEST TABLET PC FAILS SPECIFIED STANDARDS TEST ...

             

            AAKASH, WORLD'S CHEAPEST TABLET PC FAILS SPECIFIED ...

            ► 0:52
► 0:52


            www.youtube.com/watch?v=tCRGvHGBd5Q17 Jan 2012 - 52 sec - Uploaded by cvbnews

            CVB NEWS- World's cheapest tablet PC Akash's production has been overshadowed after Ministry of ...

             

            





            Aakash-Cheapest Tablet-Government Disappoints Students ...

            ► 1:51
► 1:51


            www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bgp7WJnHyRg18 Oct 2011 - 2 min - Uploaded by suneeth1980

            Indian Govt came up with the Aakash Tablet promising it would be revolutionary, ... cheapest computer for ...

             

            



More videos for aakash fails »

            India's $45 tablet 'Aakash' fails to click in trials kapil with aakash ...


befaftech.com/?attachment_id=4826Image navigation. kapil with aakash. Published January 16, 2012 at 275 × 183 in India's $45 tablet 'Aakash' fails to click in trials · kapil with aakash ...

             

            Aakash under the weather


www.akashtabletubislate.in/aakash-weather/
27 Jan 2012 – Last week, the reports from the trial of the first batch of Aakash came in. According to news, Aakash failed to impress students. The reports said ...

             

            Aakash Tablet PC Poor Service & Disappointing Performance ...


www.coolpctips.com/.../aakash-tablet-pc-poor-service-disappointing- ...
13 Jan 2012 – Do you think Aakash Tablet Failed to keep their promise ? Aakash, the world's cheapest tablet is now the world's cheapest customer service.

             

            Reasons Why The Cheapest Tablet Aakash Failed Miserably [Must ...


www.dreambloggers.com/reasons-why-the-cheapest-tablet-aakash-fai...
11 Jan 2012 – you are right I am talking about” Aakash” which has already created a buzz in the market because of it's massive booking.

             

            AAKASH, WORLD'S CHEAPEST TABLET PC FAILS SPECIFIED ...


thetabletsreview.com/aakash-worlds-cheapest-tablet-pc-fails-specified...
9 Feb 2012 – AAKASH, TABLET PC, CHEAPEST TABLET PC, WORLD'S CHEAPEST TAB, TOUCH SCREEN, GADGET, IT, TECH, COMPUTER GADGETS, ...

            Why Aakash Tablet is a big fail ?


www.xiontechinfo.com/.../why-aakash-tablet-i... - United States

             

            by Rishiraj Sisodia

            9 Feb 2012 – Aakash,the world's cheapest Tablet by Indians has finally been in the market for 3Months .The Aakash is one of the cheapest tablet yet ...

             

            Aakash fails to touch the sky of expectation: Review - Technology ...


digg.com/.../aakash_fails_to_touch_the_sky_of_expectation_review_ ...India proudly presented Aakash as a cheapest tablet. This tablet works on android platform 2.2 Froyo. This tablet costs only $35 (RS 1700 approx) and is.

             

            The inefficiency of 'economy' - Play - livemint.com


www.livemint.com/2012/01/.../The-inefficiency-of-8216eco.html
13 Jan 2012 – The Aakash, however, falls short even of this. Its design and construction fail to impress. The on-screen keyboard is a painful experience, and ...

             

             


            2012/2/24 Frederick FN Noronha फ्रेड्रिक नोरोन्या *فريدريك نورونيا <fredericknoronha@...>
             

            Has the battery run out on India's $35 tablet computer?

            By Frank Jack Daniel
            NEW DELHI | Wed Feb 22, 2012 4:32am EST

            (Reuters) - A "$35" computer launched last year in India as the
            world's cheapest tablet has run into problems and companies will be
            invited to bid again to make the device after complaints of poor
            performance and hiccups rolling out a pilot model.

            The government has hailed the Aakash tablet as an achievement of
            Indian frugal engineering that would end the digital divide in a
            country where only one in every 10 of its 1.2 billion people use the
            Internet.

            Products such as Apple Inc's iPad are beyond the reach even of many in
            the fast-growing middle class. The locally assembled machine has a
            cost price of around $50 and was to be sold to students by the
            government for $35.

            But only 10,000 units have been shipped since October. The
            relationship between the device's manufacturer, DataWind, and a
            government research institute soured amid complaints by test users
            that the processor was too slow, the battery life short and the
            resistive touch screen hard to use.

            The government's Human Resource Development Ministry is due to launch
            a new tender in the next few weeks to seek partners to build the
            tablet - a process that could see DataWind dropped.

            "It is not automatic that because you have done phase one you will do
            phase two," said a senior official at the ministry with direct
            knowledge of the project.

            Datawind won a contract last year to make 100,000 units for the
            government and it was thought likely it would make the additional 1
            million units called for in the second phase of production. But it had
            lost its first-mover advantage and would face renewed competition for
            the contract, the official said.

            "The feeling is that sufficient interest has been generated to get
            better specifications at the same or a lower price," added the
            official, who declined to be named.

            A small London-based company, DataWind developed the tablet with the
            Indian Institute of Technology. The company said the institute had
            changed the specifications late last year and now wanted a device that
            could meet U.S. military durability requirement for the same
            rock-bottom price.

            "Among other things that requires the device to take 4 inches an hour
            of sustained rain," DataWind CEO Suneet Singh told Reuters.

            "We objected to it and the project has been on hold since then, we are
            working with the ministry to get that resolved," Singh said after
            meeting with ministry officials in New Delhi on Tuesday.

            India has a reputation for creating affordable products that are easy
            to use and sturdy enough to handle its rugged environment -- from Tata
            Motors' $2,000 Nano car to generic versions of pharmaceuticals.

            But despite being a leader in software and IT services, India trails
            fellow BRIC nations Brazil, Russia and China in the drive to get the
            masses connected to the Internet and mobile phones, a report by risk
            analysis firm Maplecroft said last year.

            The number of Internet users grew 15-fold between 2000 and 2010 in
            India, according to another report. Still, just 8 percent of Indians
            have access. That compares with nearly 40 percent in China.

            The Aakash is aimed at university students for digital learning via a
            government platform that distributes electronic books and courses.

            DataWind says it is receiving tens of thousands of orders daily for a
            commercial version of the tablet with a built-in GPRS modem that is
            due to be launched this month for 2,999 rupees ($61).

            (Editing by John Chalmers)

            http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/02/22/us-india-tablet-idUSTRE81L0G320120222
            --
            FN +91-832-2409490 or +91-9822122436 fn@...
            Books from Goa,1556 http://scr.bi/Goa1556Books
            Audio recordings (mostly from Goa): http://bit.ly/GoaRecordings




            --
            Satish Jha 
            T: 301 841 7422
            F: 301 560 4909 
            ________________
             






            --
            Edward Mokurai (默雷/निशब्दगर्ज/نشبدگرج) Cherlin
            Silent Thunder is my name, and Children are my nation.
            The Cosmos is my dwelling place, the Truth my destination.
            http://wiki.sugarlabs.org/go/Replacing_Textbooks




            --
            Satish Jha 
            T: 301 841 7422
            F: 301 560 4909 
            ________________
             

          • Dorothy K. Gordon
            Can anyone tell us more about Doel and the Bangladesh experience? best regards Dorothy K. Gordon Director-General Ghana-India Kofi Annan Centre of Excellence
            Message 5 of 8 , Apr 2 4:26 AM
            View Source
            • 0 Attachment
              Can anyone tell us more about Doel and the Bangladesh experience?

              best regards

              Dorothy K. Gordon
              Director-General
              Ghana-India Kofi Annan Centre of Excellence in ICT
              Mobile: 233 265005712
              Direct Line: 233 302 683579
              Website: www.aiti-kace.com.gh


              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "Edward Cherlin" <echerlin@...>
              To: "bytesforall readers" <bytesforall_readers@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Saturday, 31 March, 2012 12:37:32 AM GMT +00:00 Casablanca / Monrovia
              Subject: Re: [bytesforall_readers] Re: Has the battery run out on India's $35 tablet computer? (Reuters)







              Thanks, Satish. However, I would amend your cost standard: If it costs less than decent printed textbooks, then the government should go ahead with the plan, and also appropriate sufficient funds to support development of Open Education Resources on every subject at every level in each of the languages needed. Bangladesh has taken the first step, digitizing its existing textbooks with UNDP funding, for use with its Doel school computer. Will India be content to remain behind?

              I asked the question recently whether an XO-3 used for four years would cost more or less than existing textbooks, and got no answer. Say, Rs1500/year in the minimum configuration? Can one buy a year's worth of textbooks for Rs400? Are textbooks from India available for inspection? Then we could answer the question whether they are decent in quality. I know that many textbooks costing far more are seriously flawed.

              http://www.textbookleague.org/103feyn.htm

              Readers can judge for themselves the quality of the first publication from the Replacing Texbooks program at Sugar Labs, now in final polishing and proofreading at

              http://booki.treehouse.su/algebra-an-algorithmic-treatment/

              and

              http://booktype-demo.sourcefabric.org/algebra-an-algorithmic-treatment/_info/

              Every math statement in the book can be executed and verified.


              On Fri, Feb 24, 2012 at 15:58, Satish Jha < satish.jha@... > wrote:





              There are more than 10,000 articles, original and repeated, talking about how Aakash failed. But few have noticed. In meetings after meetings we here that Govt is going ahead with Aakash. Just today, CII and Assocham both seemed oblivious to what is happening to it. May be because they feel the Govt is stubborn or as a senior MP told me today that Sibal believes he knows everything and defines stubbornness like few others.


              The only impact of Aakash has been two-fold: It has derailed adoption of what is available now and for some time and jeopardised teh future of those children deprived of these opportunities over the past 5 years and it has made the idea of computer for every child finally accepted by MHRD.


              All that the MHRD has to do is to take the next step and accept the best value rather than what is the cheapest, as long as the value seems "affordable". A good rule of thumb is that if it costs as much as the mid day meal scheme to educate the children as to feed their minds, it should be fine. Investment in children's learning gets any society the highest return conceivable.


              Here are some links on Aakash that anyone using the net can find at the press of a few clicks..


              Tech News - India's $45 tablet ' Aakash ' fails to click in trials | Techgig www.techgig.com/.../India-s-45-tablet- Aakash - fails -to-click-in-trials-... India's $45 tablet ' Aakash ' fails to click in trials. 33 days ago. At $45 apiece, Aakash was billed as the world's cheapest tablet PC, a device that could potentially ...

              AAKASH , WORLD'S CHEAPEST TABLET PC FAILS ... - CVB News www.cvbnews.in/video.aspx?v=tCRGvHGBd5Q No.1 Television News Agency in South Asia. MIRRORING INDIA. AAKASH , WORLD'S CHEAPEST TABLET PC FAILS SPECIFIED STANDARDS TEST ...



              AAKASH , WORLD'S CHEAPEST TABLET PC FAILS SPECIFIED ...


              ► 0:52 ► 0:52

              www.youtube.com/watch?v=tCRGvHGBd5Q 17 Jan 2012 - 52 sec - Uploaded by cvbnews

              CVB NEWS- World's cheapest tablet PC Akash's production has been overshadowed after Ministry of ...





              Aakash -Cheapest Tablet-Government Disappoints Students ...


              ► 1:51 ► 1:51

              www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bgp7WJnHyRg 18 Oct 2011 - 2 min - Uploaded by suneeth1980

              Indian Govt came up with the Aakash Tablet promising it would be revolutionary, ... cheapest computer for ...



              More videos for aakash fails »

              India's $45 tablet ' Aakash ' fails to click in trials kapil with aakash ... befaftech.com/?attachment_id=4826 Image navigation. kapil with aakash. Published January 16, 2012 at 275 × 183 in India's $45 tablet ' Aakash ' fails to click in trials · kapil with aakash ...



              Aakash under the weather www. akash tabletubislate.in/ aakash -weather/ 27 Jan 2012 – Last week, the reports from the trial of the first batch of Aakash came in. According to news, Aakash failed to impress students. The reports said ...



              Aakash Tablet PC Poor Service & Disappointing Performance ... www.coolpctips.com/.../ aakash -tablet-pc-poor-service-disappointing- ... 13 Jan 2012 – Do you think Aakash Tablet Failed to keep their promise ? Aakash , the world's cheapest tablet is now the world's cheapest customer service.



              Reasons Why The Cheapest Tablet Aakash Failed Miserably [Must ... www.dreambloggers.com/reasons-why-the-cheapest-tablet- aakash - fai ... 11 Jan 2012 – you are right I am talking about” Aakash ” which has already created a buzz in the market because of it's massive booking.



              AAKASH , WORLD'S CHEAPEST TABLET PC FAILS SPECIFIED ... thetabletsreview.com/ aakash -worlds-cheapest-tablet-pc- fails -specified... 9 Feb 2012 – AAKASH , TABLET PC, CHEAPEST TABLET PC, WORLD'S CHEAPEST TAB, TOUCH SCREEN, GADGET, IT, TECH, COMPUTER GADGETS, ...

              Why Aakash Tablet is a big fail ? www.xiontechinfo.com/.../why- aakash -tablet-i... - United States



              by Rishiraj Sisodia

              9 Feb 2012 – Aakash ,the world's cheapest Tablet by Indians has finally been in the market for 3Months .The Aakash is one of the cheapest tablet yet ...



              Aakash fails to touch the sky of expectation: Review - Technology ... digg.com/.../ aakash _ fails _to_touch_the_sky_of_expectation_review_ ... India proudly presented Aakash as a cheapest tablet. This tablet works on android platform 2.2 Froyo. This tablet costs only $35 (RS 1700 approx) and is.



              The inefficiency of 'economy' - Play - livemint.com www.livemint.com/2012/01/.../The-inefficiency-of-8216eco.html 13 Jan 2012 – The Aakash , however, falls short even of this. Its design and construction fail to impress. The on-screen keyboard is a painful experience, and ...








              2012/2/24 Frederick FN Noronha फ्रेड्रिक नोरोन्या *فريدريك نورونيا < fredericknoronha@... >








              Has the battery run out on India's $35 tablet computer?

              By Frank Jack Daniel
              NEW DELHI | Wed Feb 22, 2012 4:32am EST

              (Reuters) - A "$35" computer launched last year in India as the
              world's cheapest tablet has run into problems and companies will be
              invited to bid again to make the device after complaints of poor
              performance and hiccups rolling out a pilot model.

              The government has hailed the Aakash tablet as an achievement of
              Indian frugal engineering that would end the digital divide in a
              country where only one in every 10 of its 1.2 billion people use the
              Internet.

              Products such as Apple Inc's iPad are beyond the reach even of many in
              the fast-growing middle class. The locally assembled machine has a
              cost price of around $50 and was to be sold to students by the
              government for $35.

              But only 10,000 units have been shipped since October. The
              relationship between the device's manufacturer, DataWind, and a
              government research institute soured amid complaints by test users
              that the processor was too slow, the battery life short and the
              resistive touch screen hard to use.

              The government's Human Resource Development Ministry is due to launch
              a new tender in the next few weeks to seek partners to build the
              tablet - a process that could see DataWind dropped.

              "It is not automatic that because you have done phase one you will do
              phase two," said a senior official at the ministry with direct
              knowledge of the project.

              Datawind won a contract last year to make 100,000 units for the
              government and it was thought likely it would make the additional 1
              million units called for in the second phase of production. But it had
              lost its first-mover advantage and would face renewed competition for
              the contract, the official said.

              "The feeling is that sufficient interest has been generated to get
              better specifications at the same or a lower price," added the
              official, who declined to be named.

              A small London-based company, DataWind developed the tablet with the
              Indian Institute of Technology. The company said the institute had
              changed the specifications late last year and now wanted a device that
              could meet U.S. military durability requirement for the same
              rock-bottom price.

              "Among other things that requires the device to take 4 inches an hour
              of sustained rain," DataWind CEO Suneet Singh told Reuters.

              "We objected to it and the project has been on hold since then, we are
              working with the ministry to get that resolved," Singh said after
              meeting with ministry officials in New Delhi on Tuesday.

              India has a reputation for creating affordable products that are easy
              to use and sturdy enough to handle its rugged environment -- from Tata
              Motors' $2,000 Nano car to generic versions of pharmaceuticals.

              But despite being a leader in software and IT services, India trails
              fellow BRIC nations Brazil, Russia and China in the drive to get the
              masses connected to the Internet and mobile phones, a report by risk
              analysis firm Maplecroft said last year.

              The number of Internet users grew 15-fold between 2000 and 2010 in
              India, according to another report. Still, just 8 percent of Indians
              have access. That compares with nearly 40 percent in China.

              The Aakash is aimed at university students for digital learning via a
              government platform that distributes electronic books and courses.

              DataWind says it is receiving tens of thousands of orders daily for a
              commercial version of the tablet with a built-in GPRS modem that is
              due to be launched this month for 2,999 rupees ($61).

              (Editing by John Chalmers)

              http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/02/22/us-india-tablet-idUSTRE81L0G320120222
              --
              FN +91-832-2409490 or +91-9822122436 fn@...
              Books from Goa,1556 http://scr.bi/Goa1556Books
              Audio recordings (mostly from Goa): http://bit.ly/GoaRecordings





              --
              Satish Jha
              T: 301 841 7422
              F: 301 560 4909
              ________________








              --
              Edward Mokurai (默雷/निशब्दगर्ज/نشبدگرج) Cherlin
              Silent Thunder is my name, and Children are my nation.
              The Cosmos is my dwelling place, the Truth my destination.
              http://wiki.sugarlabs.org/go/Replacing_Textbooks
            • Edward Cherlin
              On Mon, Apr 2, 2012 at 07:26, Dorothy K. Gordon ... I can give the outline, and I can find out more for you if you will let me know more specifically what you
              Message 6 of 8 , Apr 2 5:41 AM
              View Source
              • 0 Attachment
                On Mon, Apr 2, 2012 at 07:26, Dorothy K. Gordon
                <director-general@...> wrote:
                > Can anyone tell us more about Doel and the Bangladesh experience?

                I can give the outline, and I can find out more for you if you will
                let me know more specifically what you are interested in. Before
                working with OLPC and Sugar Labs I was a high-tech market researcher
                for many years. I can also provide information on Peru, Uruguay,
                Rwanda, and other OLPC deployments, on one-to-one computing
                initiatives in other countries using other computers, and on various
                digital textbook replacement programs following the lead of
                Bangladesh.

                The Doel computer line was announced in Oct. 2011, with plans for
                preliminary distribution within government, to be followed by rollout
                to millions of students. This is still in the planning stage.
                According to this story,

                http://thenewnationbd.com/newsdetails.aspx?newsid=33679

                quantity production is planned for July 2012.

                Bangladesh has, according to UNICEF statistics, about 40 million
                children of school age (5-18). Again according to UNICEF, net primary
                school enrollment is at 86% (male) and 93% (female), and literacy
                among students is at 74% (male) and 77% (female).

                http://www.unicef.org/infobycountry/bangladesh_bangladesh_statistics.html

                Manufacturer: TSS (Telephone Shilpa Sangstha) http://www.tss.com.bd/

                Prices start at BDT (Bangladesh Taka) 13,800, $171

                Specs: http://www.bdtips.com/Article_Body.php?Article_ID=8498

                Estimated price and eventual availability:
                http://www.kamolbd.com/where-and-how-to-buy-bangladeshi-doel-laptop/

                Free textbooks in Bangla:

                http://www.ebook.gov.bd/
                e-Book ::. ই-বুক জগতে স্বাগতম in Bangla. But you do not need to know
                Bangla in order to understand and enjoy their very visual arithmetic
                books.

                http://www.priyo.com/tech/2011/04/24/pm-opens-online-version-textbo-24355.html
                Story: PM opens online version of textbooks Access to Information
                (A2I) Project of the PM’s Office and the National Curriculum and
                Textbook Board (NCTB) jointly transformed 33 primary level and 73
                secondary level textbooks into e-books in collaboration with the UNDP.

                Also, I have friends in Ghana working with OLPC. Can we talk about
                replacing Ghana's printed textbooks with Open Educational Resources?
                This would permit us to improve education greatly for a modest
                investment, with a huge Return on Investment (ROI). In some countries,
                OLPC XOs cost much less than printed textbooks, making the ROI more
                than infinite. I do not have prices for textbooks in Ghana, but
                perhaps you can help me with that.

                Sugar Labs has a project to localize our Sugar education software to
                Akan Twi, and we could work with organizations in Ghana on translating
                textbooks on any subject.

                http://translate.sugarlabs.org/ak/

                > best regards
                >
                > Dorothy K. Gordon
                > Director-General
                > Ghana-India Kofi Annan Centre of Excellence in ICT
                > Mobile: 233 265005712
                > Direct Line: 233 302 683579
                > Website: www.aiti-kace.com.gh
                >
                >
                > ----- Original Message -----
                > From: "Edward Cherlin" <echerlin@...>
                > To: "bytesforall readers" <bytesforall_readers@yahoogroups.com>
                > Sent: Saturday, 31 March, 2012 12:37:32 AM GMT +00:00 Casablanca / Monrovia
                > Subject: Re: [bytesforall_readers] Re: Has the battery run out on India's $35 tablet computer? (Reuters)
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Thanks, Satish. However, I would amend your cost standard: If it costs less than decent printed textbooks, then the government should go ahead with the plan, and also appropriate sufficient funds to support development of Open Education Resources on every subject at every level in each of the languages needed. Bangladesh has taken the first step, digitizing its existing textbooks with UNDP funding, for use with its Doel school computer. Will India be content to remain behind?
                >
                > I asked the question recently whether an XO-3 used for four years would cost more or less than existing textbooks, and got no answer. Say, Rs1500/year in the minimum configuration? Can one buy a year's worth of textbooks for Rs400? Are textbooks from India available for inspection? Then we could answer the question whether they are decent in quality. I know that many textbooks costing far more are seriously flawed.
                >
                > http://www.textbookleague.org/103feyn.htm
                >
                > Readers can judge for themselves the quality of the first publication from the Replacing Texbooks program at Sugar Labs, now in final polishing and proofreading at
                >
                > http://booki.treehouse.su/algebra-an-algorithmic-treatment/
                >
                > and
                >
                > http://booktype-demo.sourcefabric.org/algebra-an-algorithmic-treatment/_info/
                >
                > Every math statement in the book can be executed and verified.
                >
                >
                > On Fri, Feb 24, 2012 at 15:58, Satish Jha < satish.jha@... > wrote:
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > There are more than 10,000 articles, original and repeated, talking about how Aakash failed. But few have noticed. In meetings after meetings we here that Govt is going ahead with Aakash. Just today, CII and Assocham both seemed oblivious to what is happening to it. May be because they feel the Govt is stubborn or as a senior MP told me today that Sibal believes he knows everything and defines stubbornness like few others.
                >
                >
                > The only impact of Aakash has been two-fold: It has derailed adoption of what is available now and for some time and jeopardised teh future of those children deprived of these opportunities over the past 5 years and it has made the idea of computer for every child finally accepted by MHRD.
                >
                >
                > All that the MHRD has to do is to take the next step and accept the best value rather than what is the cheapest, as long as the value seems "affordable". A good rule of thumb is that if it costs as much as the mid day meal scheme to educate the children as to feed their minds, it should be fine. Investment in children's learning gets any society the highest return conceivable.
                >
                >
                > Here are some links on Aakash that anyone using the net can find at the press of a few clicks..
                >
                >
                > Tech News - India's $45 tablet ' Aakash ' fails to click in trials | Techgig www.techgig.com/.../India-s-45-tablet- Aakash - fails -to-click-in-trials-... India's $45 tablet ' Aakash ' fails to click in trials. 33 days ago. At $45 apiece, Aakash was billed as the world's cheapest tablet PC, a device that could potentially ...
                >
                > AAKASH , WORLD'S CHEAPEST TABLET PC FAILS ... - CVB News www.cvbnews.in/video.aspx?v=tCRGvHGBd5Q No.1 Television News Agency in South Asia. MIRRORING INDIA. AAKASH , WORLD'S CHEAPEST TABLET PC FAILS SPECIFIED STANDARDS TEST ...
                >
                >
                >
                > AAKASH , WORLD'S CHEAPEST TABLET PC FAILS SPECIFIED ...
                >
                >
                > ► 0:52 ► 0:52
                >
                > www.youtube.com/watch?v=tCRGvHGBd5Q 17 Jan 2012 - 52 sec - Uploaded by cvbnews
                >
                > CVB NEWS- World's cheapest tablet PC Akash's production has been overshadowed after Ministry of ...
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Aakash -Cheapest Tablet-Government Disappoints Students ...
                >
                >
                > ► 1:51 ► 1:51
                >
                > www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bgp7WJnHyRg 18 Oct 2011 - 2 min - Uploaded by suneeth1980
                >
                > Indian Govt came up with the Aakash Tablet promising it would be revolutionary, ... cheapest computer for ...
                >
                >
                >
                > More videos for aakash fails »
                >
                > India's $45 tablet ' Aakash ' fails to click in trials kapil with aakash ... befaftech.com/?attachment_id=4826 Image navigation. kapil with aakash. Published January 16, 2012 at 275 × 183 in India's $45 tablet ' Aakash ' fails to click in trials · kapil with aakash ...
                >
                >
                >
                > Aakash under the weather www. akash tabletubislate.in/ aakash -weather/ 27 Jan 2012 – Last week, the reports from the trial of the first batch of Aakash came in. According to news, Aakash failed to impress students. The reports said ...
                >
                >
                >
                > Aakash Tablet PC Poor Service & Disappointing Performance ... www.coolpctips.com/.../ aakash -tablet-pc-poor-service-disappointing- ... 13 Jan 2012 – Do you think Aakash Tablet Failed to keep their promise ? Aakash , the world's cheapest tablet is now the world's cheapest customer service.
                >
                >
                >
                > Reasons Why The Cheapest Tablet Aakash Failed Miserably [Must ... www.dreambloggers.com/reasons-why-the-cheapest-tablet- aakash - fai ... 11 Jan 2012 – you are right I am talking about” Aakash ” which has already created a buzz in the market because of it's massive booking.
                >
                >
                >
                > AAKASH , WORLD'S CHEAPEST TABLET PC FAILS SPECIFIED ... thetabletsreview.com/ aakash -worlds-cheapest-tablet-pc- fails -specified... 9 Feb 2012 – AAKASH , TABLET PC, CHEAPEST TABLET PC, WORLD'S CHEAPEST TAB, TOUCH SCREEN, GADGET, IT, TECH, COMPUTER GADGETS, ...
                >
                > Why Aakash Tablet is a big fail ? www.xiontechinfo.com/.../why- aakash -tablet-i... - United States
                >
                >
                >
                > by Rishiraj Sisodia
                >
                > 9 Feb 2012 – Aakash ,the world's cheapest Tablet by Indians has finally been in the market for 3Months .The Aakash is one of the cheapest tablet yet ...
                >
                >
                >
                > Aakash fails to touch the sky of expectation: Review - Technology ... digg.com/.../ aakash _ fails _to_touch_the_sky_of_expectation_review_ ... India proudly presented Aakash as a cheapest tablet. This tablet works on android platform 2.2 Froyo. This tablet costs only $35 (RS 1700 approx) and is.
                >
                >
                >
                > The inefficiency of 'economy' - Play - livemint.com www.livemint.com/2012/01/.../The-inefficiency-of-8216eco.html 13 Jan 2012 – The Aakash , however, falls short even of this. Its design and construction fail to impress. The on-screen keyboard is a painful experience, and ...
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > 2012/2/24 Frederick FN Noronha फ्रेड्रिक नोरोन्या *فريدريك نورونيا < fredericknoronha@... >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Has the battery run out on India's $35 tablet computer?
                >
                > By Frank Jack Daniel
                > NEW DELHI | Wed Feb 22, 2012 4:32am EST
                >
                > (Reuters) - A "$35" computer launched last year in India as the
                > world's cheapest tablet has run into problems and companies will be
                > invited to bid again to make the device after complaints of poor
                > performance and hiccups rolling out a pilot model.
                >
                > The government has hailed the Aakash tablet as an achievement of
                > Indian frugal engineering that would end the digital divide in a
                > country where only one in every 10 of its 1.2 billion people use the
                > Internet.
                >
                > Products such as Apple Inc's iPad are beyond the reach even of many in
                > the fast-growing middle class. The locally assembled machine has a
                > cost price of around $50 and was to be sold to students by the
                > government for $35.
                >
                > But only 10,000 units have been shipped since October. The
                > relationship between the device's manufacturer, DataWind, and a
                > government research institute soured amid complaints by test users
                > that the processor was too slow, the battery life short and the
                > resistive touch screen hard to use.
                >
                > The government's Human Resource Development Ministry is due to launch
                > a new tender in the next few weeks to seek partners to build the
                > tablet - a process that could see DataWind dropped.
                >
                > "It is not automatic that because you have done phase one you will do
                > phase two," said a senior official at the ministry with direct
                > knowledge of the project.
                >
                > Datawind won a contract last year to make 100,000 units for the
                > government and it was thought likely it would make the additional 1
                > million units called for in the second phase of production. But it had
                > lost its first-mover advantage and would face renewed competition for
                > the contract, the official said.
                >
                > "The feeling is that sufficient interest has been generated to get
                > better specifications at the same or a lower price," added the
                > official, who declined to be named.
                >
                > A small London-based company, DataWind developed the tablet with the
                > Indian Institute of Technology. The company said the institute had
                > changed the specifications late last year and now wanted a device that
                > could meet U.S. military durability requirement for the same
                > rock-bottom price.
                >
                > "Among other things that requires the device to take 4 inches an hour
                > of sustained rain," DataWind CEO Suneet Singh told Reuters.
                >
                > "We objected to it and the project has been on hold since then, we are
                > working with the ministry to get that resolved," Singh said after
                > meeting with ministry officials in New Delhi on Tuesday.
                >
                > India has a reputation for creating affordable products that are easy
                > to use and sturdy enough to handle its rugged environment -- from Tata
                > Motors' $2,000 Nano car to generic versions of pharmaceuticals.
                >
                > But despite being a leader in software and IT services, India trails
                > fellow BRIC nations Brazil, Russia and China in the drive to get the
                > masses connected to the Internet and mobile phones, a report by risk
                > analysis firm Maplecroft said last year.
                >
                > The number of Internet users grew 15-fold between 2000 and 2010 in
                > India, according to another report. Still, just 8 percent of Indians
                > have access. That compares with nearly 40 percent in China.
                >
                > The Aakash is aimed at university students for digital learning via a
                > government platform that distributes electronic books and courses.
                >
                > DataWind says it is receiving tens of thousands of orders daily for a
                > commercial version of the tablet with a built-in GPRS modem that is
                > due to be launched this month for 2,999 rupees ($61).
                >
                > (Editing by John Chalmers)
                >
                > http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/02/22/us-india-tablet-idUSTRE81L0G320120222
                > --
                > FN +91-832-2409490 or +91-9822122436 fn@...
                > Books from Goa,1556 http://scr.bi/Goa1556Books
                > Audio recordings (mostly from Goa): http://bit.ly/GoaRecordings
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > --
                > Satish Jha
                > T: 301 841 7422
                > F: 301 560 4909
                > ________________
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > --
                > Edward Mokurai (默雷/निशब्दगर्ज/نشبدگرج) Cherlin
                > Silent Thunder is my name, and Children are my nation.
                > The Cosmos is my dwelling place, the Truth my destination.
                > http://wiki.sugarlabs.org/go/Replacing_Textbooks
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > ------------------------------------
                >
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >



                --
                Edward Mokurai (默雷/निशब्दगर्ज/نشبدگرج) Cherlin
                Silent Thunder is my name, and Children are my nation.
                The Cosmos is my dwelling place, the Truth my destination.
                http://wiki.sugarlabs.org/go/Replacing_Textbooks
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