Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [bytesforall_readers] Benefits of OA

Expand Messages
  • V. Sasi Kumar
    ... Can we call it altruism? I would like to see it more as a right of every one of us because the money spent is public money (largely). And no one has the
    Message 1 of 12 , Apr 30, 2009
      On Thu, 2009-04-30 at 23:44 +0530, Ananya Guha wrote:

      > I don't think we need sanction of the bosses of science. That Open
      > Access is playing a stellar role in disseminating, facilitating and
      > sharing knowledge is quite a proven fact. OA is also a case in point
      > about ' intellectual altruism'. What do you say?

      Can we call it altruism? I would like to see it more as a right of every
      one of us because the money spent is public money (largely). And no one
      has the right to keep the knowledge generated to him/herself.

      Best
      --
      V. Sasi Kumar
      Free Software Foundation of India
      Please visit http://swatantryam.blogspot.com
    • Vickram Crishna
      We need the bosses of science to get out of the way, and that may need some sanctions. Through the 1990s and 2000 s, Indian science (as it is practised in
      Message 2 of 12 , Apr 30, 2009
        We need the 'bosses' of science to get out of the way, and that may need some sanctions.

        Through the 1990s and 2000's, Indian science (as it is practised in government laboratories, since so little is pursued outside of them - aside from a very small handful, in Mumbai and Bengaluru) has been led with a vigorous 'market-awareness' outlook. One of the casualties of this approach is the willingness to regard moneys spent from the public exchequer as actually delivering the public weal, insofar as publishing goes.

        I would be very interested in getting the reaction of dedicated researchers like Arun to the continuing value of the notable publications of yesteryear, in a world where publishing per se has been almost completely transformed by the lowered cost of delivery of data in electronic form. I don't mean the treasured few* very prestigious journals (premium has a different life cycle), but the majority.

        My thesis in asking this question is the potential, or even likelihood, that, by embracing Open Access and encouraging peer review, so-called 'Indian' journals might not actually overtake their paperbound counterparts, or transform the field itself by blurring the line between specialities and cutting through the constraints of publishing 'dates'. With the physical size of the Indian educaterati (my own coinsome word, copylefted with thanks, to describe a post-graduate educated population that dwarfs the entire population of some advanced nations, actually, most of them), the output of scientific contribution could be a genuine game-changer.
         
        Vickram
        http://communicall.wordpress.com
        http://vvcrishna.wordpress.com
        *A recent article about 'Nature', which is not a specialist journal but is yet exceedingly prestigious, revealed that it was the immediately former editor who used his lengthy tenure and forceful personality to completely reposition - very successfully - the publication in comparison with other scientific journals. The parallel is clear - India's science bosses need to step aside and let the journals aim at inclusion of the highest possible scientific content, eschewing any hint of bias given to papers co-signed by the bosses and their friends.


        From: Ananya Guha <nnyguha@...>
        To: bytesforall_readers@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, 30 April, 2009 23:44:39
        Subject: Re: [bytesforall_readers] Benefits of OA

        I don't think we need sanction of the bosses of science. That Open Access is playing a stellar role in disseminating, facilitating and sharing knowledge is quite a proven fact. OA is also a case in point about ' intellectual altruism'. What do you say?
         
        Ananya S Guha.

        --- On Thu, 30/4/09, Subbiah Arunachalam <subbiah.arunachalam @...> wrote:

        From: Subbiah Arunachalam <subbiah.arunachalam @...>
        Subject: [bytesforall_ readers] Benefits of OA
        To: "Frederick [FN] Noronha * फ्रेडरिक नोरोन्या" <fredericknoronha@ gmail.com>, bytesforall_ readers@yahoogro ups.com
        Date: Thursday, 30 April, 2009, 3:23 PM

        Friends:
         
        Evidence is mounting that opening up science can bring in tremedous benefits. But convincing the bosses of Indian science about the advantages of open access continues to be a pretty difficult task. Now James Boyle has written about the stellar multiplier effect that open access can bring to the economic returns of scientific research.
         
        James Boyle, What the information superhighways aren’t built of...,Financial Times, April 17, 2009. (Thanks to Lawrence Lessig.)
        ... We know that the United States’ experiments with freely providing publicly generated data -- on everything from weather to roads to navigation -- yield an incredible economic return. More than 30-fold by some estimates. We know that investment in basic science can provide stellar multipliers.
        Some scholars have been arguing that the architecture of the internet, its embrace of openness as a design principle, might revolutionize science if we could apply the same principles there -- if we could break down the legal and technical barriers that prevent the efficient networking of state funded research and data. Imagine a scientific research process that worked as efficiently as the web does for buying shoes. Then imagine what economic growth a faster, leaner, and more open scientific research environment might generate.
        Streamlining science, learning from the success of the internet, more open access to state funded basic research: these kinds of initiatives are the ones that might provide the ”superhighways of the mind,” the ”freeways of the information age” -- but they are too abstract, more likely to involve open data protocols than bundles of wires, and thus they garner little attention. Now would be an ideal time to invest in the architecture of openness, but this kind of architecture doesn’t get built with cement. ...
        Permanent link to this post Posted by Gavin Baker at 4/29/2009 12:45:00 PM.
         
         
        Most funding agencies in India have clearly failed to see the tremendous advantages of open access to peer-reviewed scientific literature and should be held responsible. [The Science Academies have done better.]
         
        There is one more dimension to it.
         
        Government invests heavily on research - on salaries of scienists and professors, on buildings and other infrastructure, equipments, chemicals, research grants, libraries, travel to conferences, and so on. And yet when Indian scientists write research papers and want to publish them they merrily give away the copyright to government-funded research to journal publishers, often commercial publishers operating from the Western world. So far no one seems to be bothered about it. Neither the politicians, be they communists or Congressmen or followers of other parties, nor students (belonging to politically affiliated student unions or unattached) have raised their voice against this unethical practice. And our scientists continue to sign on the dotted line when they receive the copyright agreement form from journal publishers. 
         
        They need not do that. They can always attach an addendum which can clearly state that they (or their institution) would retain the copyright, the right to reproduce portions of the articles in their future work, the right to self-archive their work either in an institutional archive or in a central archive (such as PubMed Central), and the right to make multiple copies for non-commercial purposes (such as distributing to students they teach). Funding agecies should insist, as such agencies in the UK have done, that researchers should make their peer-reviewd research publications openly accessible.
         
        Subbiah Arunachalam  
         


        Explore your hobbies and interests. Click here to begin.


      • Subbiah Arunachalam
        Dr Ananya Guha says there is no need for the bosses to intervene and that OA is playing a stellar role in disseminating, facilitating and sharing knowledge. On
        Message 3 of 12 , May 1, 2009
          Dr Ananya Guha says there is no need for the bosses to intervene and that OA is playing a stellar role in disseminating, facilitating and sharing knowledge. On both points he is far off the mark. Currently only about 20% of research papers published in refereed STM journals are open access. And wherever the funding agencies have mandated OA, the compliance rate is much higher. In the US both the National Institutes of Health (the world's largest funder of biomedical research) and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute have such a mandate in place. In the UK all seven research councils and the Wellcome Trust have such a mandate. In India the major government funding agecies such as DST and DBT seem to be indifferent to making research papers freely accessible. The only government agency to have issued instructions to its own laboratories to adopt open access is CSIR. On February 6, 2009, Dr Naresh Kumar, Head of Research and Development Planning Division of CSIR sent out a letter to directors of all CSIR labs requesting them to set up an open access institutional repository in each one of the CSIR labs and place the full texts of their research papers in the repository and to make all journals published by CSIR labs open access journals.  Consequently, NISCAIR, CSIR's publishing arm, has already made six of its journals OA and will make all its research journals OA by the end of July. At least three CSIR labs have their own institutional repositories; these are NAL, bangalore; NIO, Goa; and NCL, Pune.

          Of course, the science Academies have done well. INSA, New Delhi, had signed the Berlin Declaration and has made all its journals OA. Indian Academy of Sciences, Bangalore, has made all its 11 journals (including Current Science and Resonance) open access. IASc also has plans to set up an open access repository for papers by all its Fellows. Among higher educational institutions IISc and NIT-Rourkela stand out. IISc was the first Indian institution to set up an EPrints archive for the research papers of its faculty and students and today the repository has more than 20,000 articles (not all of them fully open access though). NIT-R was the first (and perhaps the only) Indian institution to have mandated open access for all faculty research publications.

          Another agency that has done well is NIC, New Delhi. With some support from ICMR, NIC has set up three OA services, viz. IndMed,MedInd and OpenMed. A private publisher in Bombay, MedKnow, brings out OA online versions of more than 80 journals owned mostly by professional societies.
           
          OA advocates (e.g. Alma Swan, Stevan Harnad) believe that funder and institutional mandates will help more research publications becoming available in the open domain. And I think it will greatly help Indian science if leading funding agecies such as DST, DBT, DAE, and the Ministry of Earth Sciences and leading research performing agencies such as ICAR, ICMR, central universities, IITs, mandate open access.

          Mr Sasi Kumar's point that access to publicly funded research should not be restricted is becoming widely accepted. It is not that  the scientists keep the knowledge themselves. The reality is far worse. Often scientists who perform research with public money give away copyright to the papers they write to journal publishers! The minimum that our government should insist is that if the research is performed with government funds, the copyright to the research results (papers) should vest with the authors or their institutions and it should not be given away to a journal publisher. More than 50% of papers published by Indian researchers are published in foreign journals and a substantial part in journals owned by commercial firms. And one such firm makes a profit, according to a recent report, of US $1,500 per MINUTE!

          Subbiah Arunachalam

           

          On Fri, May 1, 2009 at 9:47 AM, V. Sasi Kumar <sasi.fsf@...> wrote:


          On Thu, 2009-04-30 at 23:44 +0530, Ananya Guha wrote:

          > I don't think we need sanction of the bosses of science. That Open
          > Access is playing a stellar role in disseminating, facilitating and
          > sharing knowledge is quite a proven fact. OA is also a case in point
          > about ' intellectual altruism'. What do you say?

          Can we call it altruism? I would like to see it more as a right of every
          one of us because the money spent is public money (largely). And no one
          has the right to keep the knowledge generated to him/herself.

          Best
          --
          V. Sasi Kumar
          Free Software Foundation of India
          Please visit http://swatantryam.blogspot.com


        • Subbiah Arunachalam
          There are times when you might want the bosses to get out of the way and there are times when they are needed to perform certain functions. The bosses are
          Message 4 of 12 , May 1, 2009
            There are times when you might want the bosses to get out of the way and there are times when they are needed to perform certain functions. The bosses are needed to promulgate an open access mandate for all papers resulting from funds provided by their agencies or papers resulting in work carried in the laboratories they head and so on.

            There are clearly two streams in R&D output. Ideas that can advance knowledge and ideas that can be patented and commercialized. The first kind is better off if we make it part of the commons by opening it up completely. Ironically, companies such as Microsoft, Yahoo and Google are currently playing a major role in promoting cloud computing, international collaboratories and e-science (or open science), at a time when public agencies are veering round to making all research and knowledge profit oriented.

            We must thank Vickram for opening up a new thread with implications for science and public policy.


            Arun
            [Subbiah Arunachalam]

            On Fri, May 1, 2009 at 11:11 AM, Vickram Crishna <v1clist@...> wrote:


            We need the 'bosses' of science to get out of the way, and that may need some sanctions.

            Through the 1990s and 2000's, Indian science (as it is practised in government laboratories, since so little is pursued outside of them - aside from a very small handful, in Mumbai and Bengaluru) has been led with a vigorous 'market-awareness' outlook. One of the casualties of this approach is the willingness to regard moneys spent from the public exchequer as actually delivering the public weal, insofar as publishing goes.

            I would be very interested in getting the reaction of dedicated researchers like Arun to the continuing value of the notable publications of yesteryear, in a world where publishing per se has been almost completely transformed by the lowered cost of delivery of data in electronic form. I don't mean the treasured few* very prestigious journals (premium has a different life cycle), but the majority.

            My thesis in asking this question is the potential, or even likelihood, that, by embracing Open Access and encouraging peer review, so-called 'Indian' journals might not actually overtake their paperbound counterparts, or transform the field itself by blurring the line between specialities and cutting through the constraints of publishing 'dates'. With the physical size of the Indian educaterati (my own coinsome word, copylefted with thanks, to describe a post-graduate educated population that dwarfs the entire population of some advanced nations, actually, most of them), the output of scientific contribution could be a genuine game-changer.
             
            Vickram
            http://communicall.wordpress.com
            http://vvcrishna.wordpress.com
            *A recent article about 'Nature', which is not a specialist journal but is yet exceedingly prestigious, revealed that it was the immediately former editor who used his lengthy tenure and forceful personality to completely reposition - very successfully - the publication in comparison with other scientific journals. The parallel is clear - India's science bosses need to step aside and let the journals aim at inclusion of the highest possible scientific content, eschewing any hint of bias given to papers co-signed by the bosses and their friends.


            From: Ananya Guha <nnyguha@...>
            To: bytesforall_readers@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Thursday, 30 April, 2009 23:44:39
            Subject: Re: [bytesforall_readers] Benefits of OA

            I don't think we need sanction of the bosses of science. That Open Access is playing a stellar role in disseminating, facilitating and sharing knowledge is quite a proven fact. OA is also a case in point about ' intellectual altruism'. What do you say?
             
            Ananya S Guha.

            --- On Thu, 30/4/09, Subbiah Arunachalam <subbiah.arunachalam @gmail.com> wrote:

            From: Subbiah Arunachalam <subbiah.arunachalam @gmail.com>
            Subject: [bytesforall_ readers] Benefits of OA
            To: "Frederick [FN] Noronha * फ्रेडरिक नोरोन्या" <fredericknoronha@ gmail.com>, bytesforall_ readers@yahoogro ups.com

            Date: Thursday, 30 April, 2009, 3:23 PM

            Friends:
             
            Evidence is mounting that opening up science can bring in tremedous benefits. But convincing the bosses of Indian science about the advantages of open access continues to be a pretty difficult task. Now James Boyle has written about the stellar multiplier effect that open access can bring to the economic returns of scientific research.
             
            James Boyle, What the information superhighways aren’t built of...,Financial Times, April 17, 2009. (Thanks to Lawrence Lessig.)
            ... We know that the United States’ experiments with freely providing publicly generated data -- on everything from weather to roads to navigation -- yield an incredible economic return. More than 30-fold by some estimates. We know that investment in basic science can provide stellar multipliers.
            Some scholars have been arguing that the architecture of the internet, its embrace of openness as a design principle, might revolutionize science if we could apply the same principles there -- if we could break down the legal and technical barriers that prevent the efficient networking of state funded research and data. Imagine a scientific research process that worked as efficiently as the web does for buying shoes. Then imagine what economic growth a faster, leaner, and more open scientific research environment might generate.
            Streamlining science, learning from the success of the internet, more open access to state funded basic research: these kinds of initiatives are the ones that might provide the ”superhighways of the mind,” the ”freeways of the information age” -- but they are too abstract, more likely to involve open data protocols than bundles of wires, and thus they garner little attention. Now would be an ideal time to invest in the architecture of openness, but this kind of architecture doesn’t get built with cement. ...
            Permanent link to this post Posted by Gavin Baker at 4/29/2009 12:45:00 PM.
             
             
            Most funding agencies in India have clearly failed to see the tremendous advantages of open access to peer-reviewed scientific literature and should be held responsible. [The Science Academies have done better.]
             
            There is one more dimension to it.
             
            Government invests heavily on research - on salaries of scienists and professors, on buildings and other infrastructure, equipments, chemicals, research grants, libraries, travel to conferences, and so on. And yet when Indian scientists write research papers and want to publish them they merrily give away the copyright to government-funded research to journal publishers, often commercial publishers operating from the Western world. So far no one seems to be bothered about it. Neither the politicians, be they communists or Congressmen or followers of other parties, nor students (belonging to politically affiliated student unions or unattached) have raised their voice against this unethical practice. And our scientists continue to sign on the dotted line when they receive the copyright agreement form from journal publishers. 
             
            They need not do that. They can always attach an addendum which can clearly state that they (or their institution) would retain the copyright, the right to reproduce portions of the articles in their future work, the right to self-archive their work either in an institutional archive or in a central archive (such as PubMed Central), and the right to make multiple copies for non-commercial purposes (such as distributing to students they teach). Funding agecies should insist, as such agencies in the UK have done, that researchers should make their peer-reviewd research publications openly accessible.
             
            Subbiah Arunachalam  
             


            Explore your hobbies and interests. Click here to begin.



          • V. Sasi Kumar
            It is more or less established that mandating Open Access is the most effective way. But it is also unfortunate that many senior scientists in India continue
            Message 5 of 12 , May 1, 2009
              It is more or less established that mandating Open Access is the most
              effective way. But it is also unfortunate that many senior scientists in
              India continue to tell the younger researchers to publish in
              "international" journals, but not in Open Access journals. It is also
              unfortunate that our funding agencies refuse to give a thought to the
              issue in spite of people like Prof. Subbiah Arunachalam and
              organisations like the Free Software Foundation of India writing to them
              pointing out the benefits of OA.

              Best
              Sasi

              On Sat, 2009-05-02 at 08:57 +0530, Subbiah Arunachalam wrote:
              >
              >
              > Dr Ananya Guha says there is no need for the bosses to intervene and
              > that OA is playing a stellar role in disseminating, facilitating and
              > sharing knowledge. On both points he is far off the mark. Currently
              > only about 20% of research papers published in refereed STM journals
              > are open access. And wherever the funding agencies have mandated OA,
              > the compliance rate is much higher. In the US both the National
              > Institutes of Health (the world's largest funder of biomedical
              > research) and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute have such a mandate
              > in place. In the UK all seven research councils and the Wellcome Trust
              > have such a mandate. In India the major government funding agecies
              > such as DST and DBT seem to be indifferent to making research papers
              > freely accessible. The only government agency to have issued
              > instructions to its own laboratories to adopt open access is CSIR. On
              > February 6, 2009, Dr Naresh Kumar, Head of Research and Development
              > Planning Division of CSIR sent out a letter to directors of all CSIR
              > labs requesting them to set up an open access institutional repository
              > in each one of the CSIR labs and place the full texts of their
              > research papers in the repository and to make all journals published
              > by CSIR labs open access journals. Consequently, NISCAIR, CSIR's
              > publishing arm, has already made six of its journals OA and will make
              > all its research journals OA by the end of July. At least three CSIR
              > labs have their own institutional repositories; these are NAL,
              > bangalore; NIO, Goa; and NCL, Pune.
              >
              > Of course, the science Academies have done well. INSA, New Delhi, had
              > signed the Berlin Declaration and has made all its journals OA. Indian
              > Academy of Sciences, Bangalore, has made all its 11 journals
              > (including Current Science and Resonance) open access. IASc also has
              > plans to set up an open access repository for papers by all its
              > Fellows. Among higher educational institutions IISc and NIT-Rourkela
              > stand out. IISc was the first Indian institution to set up an EPrints
              > archive for the research papers of its faculty and students and today
              > the repository has more than 20,000 articles (not all of them fully
              > open access though). NIT-R was the first (and perhaps the only) Indian
              > institution to have mandated open access for all faculty research
              > publications.
              >
              > Another agency that has done well is NIC, New Delhi. With some support
              > from ICMR, NIC has set up three OA services, viz. IndMed,MedInd and
              > OpenMed. A private publisher in Bombay, MedKnow, brings out OA online
              > versions of more than 80 journals owned mostly by professional
              > societies.
              >
              > OA advocates (e.g. Alma Swan, Stevan Harnad) believe that funder and
              > institutional mandates will help more research publications becoming
              > available in the open domain. And I think it will greatly help Indian
              > science if leading funding agecies such as DST, DBT, DAE, and the
              > Ministry of Earth Sciences and leading research performing agencies
              > such as ICAR, ICMR, central universities, IITs, mandate open access.
              >
              > Mr Sasi Kumar's point that access to publicly funded research should
              > not be restricted is becoming widely accepted. It is not that the
              > scientists keep the knowledge themselves. The reality is far worse.
              > Often scientists who perform research with public money give away
              > copyright to the papers they write to journal publishers! The minimum
              > that our government should insist is that if the research is performed
              > with government funds, the copyright to the research results (papers)
              > should vest with the authors or their institutions and it should not
              > be given away to a journal publisher. More than 50% of papers
              > published by Indian researchers are published in foreign journals and
              > a substantial part in journals owned by commercial firms. And one such
              > firm makes a profit, according to a recent report, of US $1,500 per
              > MINUTE!
              >
              > Subbiah Arunachalam

              >
              --
              V. Sasi Kumar
              Free Software Foundation of India
              Please visit http://swatantryam.blogspot.com
            • Subbiah Arunachalam
              I don t think anyone should question the right of researchers to publish their research findings in journals of their choice, as long as they make their papers
              Message 6 of 12 , May 3, 2009
                I don't think anyone should question the right of researchers to publish their research findings in journals of their choice, as long as they make their papers available to non-subscribers by placing the full text of their papers in inter-operable open access repositories.  These repositories could be institutional [such as the ones at the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore; National Aerospace Laboratories, Bangalore; National Institute of Oceanography, Goa; and National Institute of Technology, Rourkela] or central [such as PubMed Central operated by NIH; and OpenMED operated by National Informatics Centre, New Delhi]. 

                Incidentally, many "international" journals are open access journals such as those published by PLoS. Today there are more than 4,100 open access journals (as listed in the Directory of Open Access Journals, http://www.doaj.org/), more than 3,000 of which use the Open Journals System software developed by the Public Knowledge Project (PKP). 

                Many Indian journals are open access journals. Prominent among them are the journals published by the Indian Academy of Sciences, Bangalore, and MedKnow Publications, Bombay. Six CSIR journals are already OA and within the next three months all journals published by NISCAIR, New Delhi, will become open access journals. NIC, New Delhi, is also bringing out the online OA versions of many biomedical journals. India is also home to a leading secondary or alerting service to OA publications - Open J-Gate of Informatics India, Bangalore [www.openj-gate.com/].

                The more serious problem is that of Indian researchers doing research with public funding GIFTING AWAY COPYRIGHT to journal publishers, often commercial publishers operating from Europe and North America. This is a practice which should be curbed. We should bring it to the attention of the CAG and Members of the Parliament. Unfortunately we do not yet have strong movements in India such as Students for Free Culture [http://freeculture.org/] and the Alliance for Taxpayers Access [http://www.taxpayeraccess.org/].

                Subbiah Arunachalam





                On Sat, May 2, 2009 at 10:01 AM, V. Sasi Kumar <sasi.fsf@...> wrote:


                It is more or less established that mandating Open Access is the most
                effective way. But it is also unfortunate that many senior scientists in
                India continue to tell the younger researchers to publish in
                "international" journals, but not in Open Access journals. It is also
                unfortunate that our funding agencies refuse to give a thought to the
                issue in spite of people like Prof. Subbiah Arunachalam and
                organisations like the Free Software Foundation of India writing to them
                pointing out the benefits of OA.

                Best
                Sasi



                On Sat, 2009-05-02 at 08:57 +0530, Subbiah Arunachalam wrote:
                >
                >
                > Dr Ananya Guha says there is no need for the bosses to intervene and
                > that OA is playing a stellar role in disseminating, facilitating and
                > sharing knowledge. On both points he is far off the mark. Currently
                > only about 20% of research papers published in refereed STM journals
                > are open access. And wherever the funding agencies have mandated OA,
                > the compliance rate is much higher. In the US both the National
                > Institutes of Health (the world's largest funder of biomedical
                > research) and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute have such a mandate
                > in place. In the UK all seven research councils and the Wellcome Trust
                > have such a mandate. In India the major government funding agecies
                > such as DST and DBT seem to be indifferent to making research papers
                > freely accessible. The only government agency to have issued
                > instructions to its own laboratories to adopt open access is CSIR. On
                > February 6, 2009, Dr Naresh Kumar, Head of Research and Development
                > Planning Division of CSIR sent out a letter to directors of all CSIR
                > labs requesting them to set up an open access institutional repository
                > in each one of the CSIR labs and place the full texts of their
                > research papers in the repository and to make all journals published
                > by CSIR labs open access journals. Consequently, NISCAIR, CSIR's
                > publishing arm, has already made six of its journals OA and will make
                > all its research journals OA by the end of July. At least three CSIR
                > labs have their own institutional repositories; these are NAL,
                > bangalore; NIO, Goa; and NCL, Pune.
                >
                > Of course, the science Academies have done well. INSA, New Delhi, had
                > signed the Berlin Declaration and has made all its journals OA. Indian
                > Academy of Sciences, Bangalore, has made all its 11 journals
                > (including Current Science and Resonance) open access. IASc also has
                > plans to set up an open access repository for papers by all its
                > Fellows. Among higher educational institutions IISc and NIT-Rourkela
                > stand out. IISc was the first Indian institution to set up an EPrints
                > archive for the research papers of its faculty and students and today
                > the repository has more than 20,000 articles (not all of them fully
                > open access though). NIT-R was the first (and perhaps the only) Indian
                > institution to have mandated open access for all faculty research
                > publications.
                >
                > Another agency that has done well is NIC, New Delhi. With some support
                > from ICMR, NIC has set up three OA services, viz. IndMed,MedInd and
                > OpenMed. A private publisher in Bombay, MedKnow, brings out OA online
                > versions of more than 80 journals owned mostly by professional
                > societies.
                >
                > OA advocates (e.g. Alma Swan, Stevan Harnad) believe that funder and
                > institutional mandates will help more research publications becoming
                > available in the open domain. And I think it will greatly help Indian
                > science if leading funding agecies such as DST, DBT, DAE, and the
                > Ministry of Earth Sciences and leading research performing agencies
                > such as ICAR, ICMR, central universities, IITs, mandate open access.
                >
                > Mr Sasi Kumar's point that access to publicly funded research should
                > not be restricted is becoming widely accepted. It is not that the
                > scientists keep the knowledge themselves. The reality is far worse.
                > Often scientists who perform research with public money give away
                > copyright to the papers they write to journal publishers! The minimum
                > that our government should insist is that if the research is performed
                > with government funds, the copyright to the research results (papers)
                > should vest with the authors or their institutions and it should not
                > be given away to a journal publisher. More than 50% of papers
                > published by Indian researchers are published in foreign journals and
                > a substantial part in journals owned by commercial firms. And one such
                > firm makes a profit, according to a recent report, of US $1,500 per
                > MINUTE!
                >
                > Subbiah Arunachalam

                >
                --
                V. Sasi Kumar
                Free Software Foundation of India
                Please visit http://swatantryam.blogspot.com


              • Ananya Guha
                I agree and feel that the open source movement in India should be strenghtened and brought to social science and humanities. Gifting away copywright is not the
                Message 7 of 12 , May 3, 2009
                  I agree and feel that the open source movement in India should be strenghtened and brought to social science and humanities. Gifting away copywright is not the correct thing and is also not ethical. Again like in all print journals, we should also be aware of quality. But what little I have seen of open source journals abroad is that they follow a strict pattern of refereeing. That augurs well. The disconcerting sign is that some take fees for publication.
                   
                  Ananya S Guha.


                  From: Subbiah Arunachalam <subbiah.arunachalam@...>
                  To: bytesforall_readers@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Monday, 4 May, 2009 5:58:33 AM
                  Subject: Re: [bytesforall_readers] Benefits of OA

                  I don't think anyone should question the right of researchers to publish their research findings in journals of their choice, as long as they make their papers available to non-subscribers by placing the full text of their papers in inter-operable open access repositories.  These repositories could be institutional [such as the ones at the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore; National Aerospace Laboratories, Bangalore; National Institute of Oceanography, Goa; and National Institute of Technology, Rourkela] or central [such as PubMed Central operated by NIH; and OpenMED operated by National Informatics Centre, New Delhi]. 


                  Incidentally, many "international" journals are open access journals such as those published by PLoS. Today there are more than 4,100 open access journals (as listed in the Directory of Open Access Journals, http://www.doaj. org/), more than 3,000 of which use the Open Journals System software developed by the Public Knowledge Project (PKP). 

                  Many Indian journals are open access journals. Prominent among them are the journals published by the Indian Academy of Sciences, Bangalore, and MedKnow Publications, Bombay. Six CSIR journals are already OA and within the next three months all journals published by NISCAIR, New Delhi, will become open access journals. NIC, New Delhi, is also bringing out the online OA versions of many biomedical journals. India is also home to a leading secondary or alerting service to OA publications - Open J-Gate of Informatics India, Bangalore [www.openj-gate.com/].

                  The more serious problem is that of Indian researchers doing research with public funding GIFTING AWAY COPYRIGHT to journal publishers, often commercial publishers operating from Europe and North America. This is a practice which should be curbed. We should bring it to the attention of the CAG and Members of the Parliament. Unfortunately we do not yet have strong movements in India such as Students for Free Culture [http://freeculture. org/] and the Alliance for Taxpayers Access [http://www.taxpayer access.org/ ].

                  Subbiah Arunachalam





                  On Sat, May 2, 2009 at 10:01 AM, V. Sasi Kumar <sasi.fsf@gmail. com> wrote:


                  It is more or less established that mandating Open Access is the most
                  effective way. But it is also unfortunate that many senior scientists in
                  India continue to tell the younger researchers to publish in
                  "international" journals, but not in Open Access journals. It is also
                  unfortunate that our funding agencies refuse to give a thought to the
                  issue in spite of people like Prof. Subbiah Arunachalam and
                  organisations like the Free Software Foundation of India writing to them
                  pointing out the benefits of OA.

                  Best
                  Sasi



                  On Sat, 2009-05-02 at 08:57 +0530, Subbiah Arunachalam wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > Dr Ananya Guha says there is no need for the bosses to intervene and
                  > that OA is playing a stellar role in disseminating, facilitating and
                  > sharing knowledge. On both points he is far off the mark. Currently
                  > only about 20% of research papers published in refereed STM journals
                  > are open access. And wherever the funding agencies have mandated OA,
                  > the compliance rate is much higher. In the US both the National
                  > Institutes of Health (the world's largest funder of biomedical
                  > research) and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute have such a mandate
                  > in place. In the UK all seven research councils and the Wellcome Trust
                  > have such a mandate. In India the major government funding agecies
                  > such as DST and DBT seem to be indifferent to making research papers
                  > freely accessible. The only government agency to have issued
                  > instructions to its own laboratories to adopt open access is CSIR. On
                  > February 6, 2009, Dr Naresh Kumar, Head of Research and Development
                  > Planning Division of CSIR sent out a letter to directors of all CSIR
                  > labs requesting them to set up an open access institutional repository
                  > in each one of the CSIR labs and place the full texts of their
                  > research papers in the repository and to make all journals published
                  > by CSIR labs open access journals. Consequently, NISCAIR, CSIR's
                  > publishing arm, has already made six of its journals OA and will make
                  > all its research journals OA by the end of July. At least three CSIR
                  > labs have their own institutional repositories; these are NAL,
                  > bangalore; NIO, Goa; and NCL, Pune.
                  >
                  > Of course, the science Academies have done well. INSA, New Delhi, had
                  > signed the Berlin Declaration and has made all its journals OA. Indian
                  > Academy of Sciences, Bangalore, has made all its 11 journals
                  > (including Current Science and Resonance) open access. IASc also has
                  > plans to set up an open access repository for papers by all its
                  > Fellows. Among higher educational institutions IISc and NIT-Rourkela
                  > stand out. IISc was the first Indian institution to set up an EPrints
                  > archive for the research papers of its faculty and students and today
                  > the repository has more than 20,000 articles (not all of them fully
                  > open access though). NIT-R was the first (and perhaps the only) Indian
                  > institution to have mandated open access for all faculty research
                  > publications.
                  >
                  > Another agency that has done well is NIC, New Delhi. With some support
                  > from ICMR, NIC has set up three OA services, viz. IndMed,MedInd and
                  > OpenMed. A private publisher in Bombay, MedKnow, brings out OA online
                  > versions of more than 80 journals owned mostly by professional
                  > societies.
                  >
                  > OA advocates (e.g. Alma Swan, Stevan Harnad) believe that funder and
                  > institutional mandates will help more research publications becoming
                  > available in the open domain. And I think it will greatly help Indian
                  > science if leading funding agecies such as DST, DBT, DAE, and the
                  > Ministry of Earth Sciences and leading research performing agencies
                  > such as ICAR, ICMR, central universities, IITs, mandate open access.
                  >
                  > Mr Sasi Kumar's point that access to publicly funded research should
                  > not be restricted is becoming widely accepted. It is not that the
                  > scientists keep the knowledge themselves. The reality is far worse.
                  > Often scientists who perform research with public money give away
                  > copyright to the papers they write to journal publishers! The minimum
                  > that our government should insist is that if the research is performed
                  > with government funds, the copyright to the research results (papers)
                  > should vest with the authors or their institutions and it should not
                  > be given away to a journal publisher. More than 50% of papers
                  > published by Indian researchers are published in foreign journals and
                  > a substantial part in journals owned by commercial firms. And one such
                  > firm makes a profit, according to a recent report, of US $1,500 per
                  > MINUTE!
                  >
                  > Subbiah Arunachalam

                  >
                  --
                  V. Sasi Kumar
                  Free Software Foundation of India
                  Please visit http://swatantryam. blogspot. com




                  Bollywood news, movie reviews, film trailers and more! Click here.
                • V. Sasi Kumar
                  Of course, my intention was not to question the right of researchers to publish in journals of their choice. Sorry if it sounded that way. What I meant was
                  Message 8 of 12 , May 4, 2009
                    Of course, my intention was not to question the right of researchers to
                    publish in journals of their choice. Sorry if it sounded that way. What
                    I meant was that while senior scientists do tell their younger
                    colleagues to publish in "international" journals, they do not mention
                    about making available their work to their colleagues through an Open
                    Access mechanism. As Prof. Arunachalam has rightly pointed out, this can
                    be done by making the papers accessible to others through Open Access
                    repositories, and not necessarily by publishing in Open Access journals.
                    I believe that what the seniors say carries some weight with young
                    researchers, and it would be good if the seniors talk about access.
                    Unfortunately this does not seem to happen most of the time. I think,
                    apart from mandating Open Access, it is necessary to make people,
                    especially young researchers, aware of the problem of access.

                    Regards
                    Sasi

                    On Mon, 2009-05-04 at 05:58 +0530, Subbiah Arunachalam wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > I don't think anyone should question the right of researchers to
                    > publish their research findings in journals of their choice, as long
                    > as they make their papers available to non-subscribers by placing the
                    > full text of their papers in inter-operable open access repositories.
                    > These repositories could be institutional [such as the ones at the
                    > Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore; National Aerospace
                    > Laboratories, Bangalore; National Institute of Oceanography, Goa; and
                    > National Institute of Technology, Rourkela] or central [such as PubMed
                    > Central operated by NIH; and OpenMED operated by National Informatics
                    > Centre, New Delhi].
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Incidentally, many "international" journals are open access journals
                    > such as those published by PLoS. Today there are more than 4,100 open
                    > access journals (as listed in the Directory of Open Access
                    > Journals, http://www.doaj.org/), more than 3,000 of which use the Open
                    > Journals System software developed by the Public Knowledge Project
                    > (PKP).
                    >
                    >
                    > Many Indian journals are open access journals. Prominent among them
                    > are the journals published by the Indian Academy of Sciences,
                    > Bangalore, and MedKnow Publications, Bombay. Six CSIR journals are
                    > already OA and within the next three months all journals published by
                    > NISCAIR, New Delhi, will become open access journals. NIC, New Delhi,
                    > is also bringing out the online OA versions of many biomedical
                    > journals. India is also home to a leading secondary or alerting
                    > service to OA publications - Open J-Gate of Informatics India,
                    > Bangalore [www.openj-gate.com/].
                    >
                    >
                    > The more serious problem is that of Indian researchers doing research
                    > with public funding GIFTING AWAY COPYRIGHT to journal publishers,
                    > often commercial publishers operating from Europe and North America.
                    > This is a practice which should be curbed. We should bring it to the
                    > attention of the CAG and Members of the Parliament. Unfortunately we
                    > do not yet have strong movements in India such as Students for Free
                    > Culture [http://freeculture.org/%5d and the Alliance for Taxpayers
                    > Access [http://www.taxpayeraccess.org/%5d.
                    >
                    >
                    > Subbiah Arunachalam


                    >
                    --
                    V. Sasi Kumar
                    Free Software Foundation of India
                    Please visit http://swatantryam.blogspot.com
                  • V. Sasi Kumar
                    ... I suppose you meant the Open Access movement in India and Open Access journals. Yes, both the Open Access movement and the Free Software movement in India
                    Message 9 of 12 , May 5, 2009
                      On Mon, 2009-05-04 at 09:47 +0530, Ananya Guha wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      > I agree and feel that the open source movement in India should be
                      > strenghtened and brought to social science and humanities. Gifting
                      > away copywright is not the correct thing and is also not ethical.
                      > Again like in all print journals, we should also be aware of quality.
                      > But what little I have seen of open source journals abroad is that
                      > they follow a strict pattern of refereeing. That augurs well. The
                      > disconcerting sign is that some take fees for publication.

                      I suppose you meant the Open Access movement in India and Open Access
                      journals. Yes, both the Open Access movement and the Free Software
                      movement in India need to be strengthened. As usual, we are behind the
                      West in generating new ideas and even in promoting good ideas that come
                      from the West. It is surprising that Sweden has a party (the Pirate
                      Party) that is the fourth largest in the country which promotes ideas
                      from the Free Software and Open Access movements, but in India, the
                      ideas are yet to reach even a large part of the academia.

                      Best
                      --
                      V. Sasi Kumar
                      Free Software Foundation of India
                      Please visit http://swatantryam.blogspot.com
                    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.