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Calcium ion migration

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  • Jim
    Reading the comments in presets section on the bwgen site, it s obvious that at least a few people are concerned about calcium ion migration. This concern
    Message 1 of 7 , Nov 5, 2002
      Reading the comments in presets section on the bwgen site, it's
      obvious that at least a few people are concerned about calcium ion
      migration. This concern seems to originate from the "Silent Sounds"
      site (at http://www.mindspring.com/~silent/freqs.htm) which has the
      following entry:

      9,11,16XXX documented calcium ion migration (brain tissue)

      They provide no clue where this migration is "documented." In my
      searching, I have found no information about this effect. It looks
      like every reference I've found is based on the Silent Sounds entry
      I mentioned.

      Mike's list (and all its derivatives) say that these frequencies
      are "bad," but the Silent Sounds site doesn't give any indication on
      whether calcium ion migration is a good or bad thing. (For example,
      calcium ion migration away from arthitic joints is a good thing, as
      is calcium ion migration towards a mending broken bone.)

      So does anyone have any evidence that these frequencies actually
      cause calcium ion migration? Does anyone have any evidence that
      calcium ion migration is bad? If not, the concern over these
      frequencies seems unwarranted.

      - Jim
    • Jim
      I should have waited a couple of hours before posting that. As I kept looking for information about calcium ions in the brain, I happened to stumble across
      Message 2 of 7 , Nov 5, 2002
        I should have waited a couple of hours before posting that. As I
        kept looking for information about calcium ions in the brain, I
        happened to stumble across what may the source for the warning. It
        was hard to find because the original paper is gone, but I was lucky
        enough to find an HTML version of the original PDF cached at Google.

        Let me summarize by saying this: if this is the source, bwgen users
        have nothing to worry about.

        The paper is called "Alterations in Calcium Ion Activity Caused by
        ELF and RF Electromagnetic Fields" by Dr. Carl Blackman with the
        U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. You can see it at
        http://216.239.51.100/search?q=cache:qRpCTYCSOEIC:www.land-
        sbg.gv.at/celltower/english/Proceedings%2520(12)%2520Blackman.pdf

        Blackman's experiments were with electromagnetic fields of 50, 147,
        and 450 MHz (yes, megahertz), that were amplitude modulated at low
        frequencies. He found calcium ion effects on in vitro (i.e. dead)
        chicken brains when the high frequency EMF signals were modulated at
        6, 9, 11, 16 and 20 Hz.

        So what we're talking about here is radiofrequency radiation being
        pulsed at low frequencies. Just having a low frequency
        electromagnetic field doesn't have the same effect. And of course
        the article doesn't talk about brainwave frequencies at all.

        If Blackman's research is the source (and that seems likely),
        whoever originally thought this applied to brainwaves didn't
        understand his work at all.

        I suspect that a lot of people have been very concerned for no
        reason.

        - Jim
      • Khem Caigan
        ... Calcium ions are sloshing around with my every thought. Various studies cited below by Beck and Byrd discuss the biological and pathological aspects of
        Message 3 of 7 , Nov 5, 2002
          Jim doth schriebble:
          >
          > So does anyone have any evidence that these frequencies actually
          > cause calcium ion migration? Does anyone have any evidence that
          > calcium ion migration is bad? If not, the concern over these
          > frequencies seems unwarranted.

          Calcium ions are sloshing around with my every thought. Various studies
          cited below by Beck and Byrd discuss the biological and pathological
          aspects of calcium efflux.

          Any electromagnetic or audio signal in the Extremely Low Frequency/ELF
          and Very Low Frequency/VLF range is liable to be transduced by living
          organisms.

          Here are some links [ and, no, calcium efflux studies did not originate
          with Blackman ]:

          BIBLIOGRAPHY ON THE PSYCHOACTIVITY OF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS
          Robert C. Beck and Eldon A. Byrd
          http://www.vxm.com/bib.doc.html

          CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY ASSOCIATED WITH RADIATION FIELDS OF MOBILE
          TELEPHONES
          http://digilander.libero.it/bioem/adeyoverview1.html

          http://www.raven1.net/adeycv.htm

          Maxwell's Silver Hammer
          http://www.sumeria.net/tech/emfwar.html

          Neural Networks, Brainwaves, And Ionic Structures: A Biophysical Model
          For Conscious System Processing
          http://www.vxm.com/21R.7.html

          Neural Networks, Brainwaves, And Ionic Structures: A Biophysical Model
          For Altered States Of Consciousness
          http://www.vxm.com/21R.36.html


          All the Best,


          ~ Khem Caigan
          <Khem@...>
        • Eric Knapp
          You are missing a vital point brought in all your links. All of these refer to electromagnetic fields. It s an entirely different beast from binaural beats and
          Message 4 of 7 , Nov 6, 2002

            You are missing a vital point brought in all your links. All of these refer to electromagnetic fields. It's an entirely different beast from binaural beats and can't be considered on the same level. There are no "medical" references I can find to say that calcium ion migration in the brain is good, bad, or in-different. I've done some looking and reading on the net and talking to several physician friends of mine and I can't come up with anything except for those sites on the net associated with EMP and electromagnetism and RF frequencies. You can make a big deal of it if you wish, but "in my opinion" it's a moot point as far as binaurals go.

            Eric

             

             Khem Caigan <Khem@...> wrote:



            Jim doth schriebble:
            >
            > So does anyone have any evidence that these frequencies actually
            > cause calcium ion migration?  Does anyone have any evidence that
            > calcium ion migration is bad?  If not, the concern over these
            > frequencies seems unwarranted.

            Calcium ions are sloshing around with my every thought. Various studies
            cited below by Beck and Byrd discuss the biological and pathological
            aspects of calcium efflux.

            Any electromagnetic or audio signal in the Extremely Low Frequency/ELF
            and Very Low Frequency/VLF range is liable to be transduced by living
            organisms.

            Here are some links [ and, no, calcium efflux studies did not originate
            with Blackman ]:

            BIBLIOGRAPHY ON THE PSYCHOACTIVITY OF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS
            Robert C. Beck and Eldon A. Byrd
            http://www.vxm.com/bib.doc.html

            CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY ASSOCIATED WITH RADIATION FIELDS OF MOBILE
            TELEPHONES
            http://digilander.libero.it/bioem/adeyoverview1.html

            http://www.raven1.net/adeycv.htm

            Maxwell's Silver Hammer
            http://www.sumeria.net/tech/emfwar.html

            Neural Networks, Brainwaves, And Ionic Structures: A Biophysical Model
            For Conscious System Processing
            http://www.vxm.com/21R.7.html

            Neural Networks, Brainwaves, And Ionic Structures: A Biophysical Model
            For Altered States Of Consciousness
            http://www.vxm.com/21R.36.html


            All the Best,


            ~ Khem Caigan
            <Khem@...>

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          • Jim
            ... I don t argue that. My point was that the frequencies listed for bad calcium ion migration appear to come from a study modulating radio frequencies, and
            Message 5 of 7 , Nov 6, 2002
              --- In bwgen@y..., Khem Caigan <Khem@Z...> wrote:

              > Any electromagnetic or audio signal in the Extremely Low
              > Frequency/ELF and Very Low Frequency/VLF range is liable
              > to be transduced by living organisms.

              I don't argue that. My point was that the frequencies listed
              for "bad calcium ion migration" appear to come from a study
              modulating radio frequencies, and are thus completely inapplicable
              to binaural frequencies.

              > Here are some links [ and, no, calcium efflux studies did not
              > originate with Blackman ]:

              Again, I was merely looking for the source of the frequencies in the
              list, not the origin of calcium efflux. Looking through the links
              you provided, the only ones I could find that actually included any
              of the frequencies from the "Silent Sounds" list referenced
              Blackman's work with high-frequency radio waves.

              In short, I don't believe that (for example) the effect of a 500 MHz
              electromagnetic signal amplitude modulated at 9 Hz is the same as a
              9 Hz binaural signal, or even a 9 Hz electromagnetic signal.

              My other point is that someone making these frequency lists decided
              that calcium ion migration was "bad." Other articles I've found say
              that just being in a theta state causes a great deal of calcium
              efflux, which plays a large role in memory consolidation. So even
              if these effects happened at the listed frequencies (which, again, I
              don't believe), they aren't necessarily "bad."

              - Jim
            • Khem Caigan
              ... I m aware that many of these links refer to electromagnetic fields. Many of the links below also refer to electromagnetic fields, fields that are
              Message 6 of 7 , Nov 6, 2002
                Eric doth schriebble:
                >
                > You are missing a vital point brought in all your links. All of these
                > refer to electromagnetic fields.

                I'm aware that many of these links refer to electromagnetic fields.
                Many of the links below also refer to electromagnetic fields, fields
                that are biologically significant, some of them in the nanotesla and
                picotesla range, some of them fields that are less powerful than the
                earth's magnetic field. Certainly less powerful than the field from a
                set of speakers or a pair of headphones, for instance.

                > It's an entirely different beast from binaural beats and can't be considered on the same level.

                I don't know what you mean when you use the word 'level' here. I'm
                looking into the biological transduction of electromagnetic waves and
                acoustic waves, the 'translation' of them, if you will. Like the
                piezoelectric effect in bones, for instance. Physical stress and
                vibrations give rise to electric waveforms, and vice versa. They're
                interconvertible.

                > There are no "medical" references I can find to say that
                > calcium ion migration in the brain is good, bad, or in-different.

                Fair enough. I haven't exhausted the resources available to me, as yet.
                Still poking around in MEDLARS. Here's some more stuff, for any folks on
                the list that care to slog through it. I'm assuming that the rest of you
                know where the delete key is.


                B. Lipinski, ed., 'Electronic Conduction and Mechanical Transduction in
                Biological Materials.', Marcel Dekker, Inc., New York, 1982

                Biosystems Liquid Crystals & Potential Effects of Natural & Artificial
                Electromagnetic Fields (EMFs)
                http://frontpage.simnet.is/vgv/jim1.htm

                Lyskov, E.B.; Juutilainen, J.; Jousmaki, V.; Partanen, J.; Medvedev, S.;
                Hanninen, O.; 'Effects of 45Hz magnetic fields on the functional state
                of the human brain.', Bioelectromagnetics, 14(2): 87-95, 1993.
                http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov:80/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=8494559&dopt=Abstract

                Juutilainen, J; Stevens, RG; Anderson, LE; Hansen, NH; Kilpelainen, M;
                Kumlin, T; Laitinen, JT; Sobel, E; Wilson, BW; 'Nocturnal
                6-hydroxymelatonin sulfate excretion in female workers exposed to
                magnetic fields.', Bioelectromagnetics, 14(2):87-95, 1993.
                http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov:80/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=8494559&dopt=Abstract

                Persinger, M.A., 'Out-of-body-like experiences are more probable on
                people with elevated 'complex partial epileptic-like syndrome' during
                periods of enhanced geomagnetic activity: a nonlinear effect.',
                Perceptual and Motor Skills, Apr.80(2):563-9, 1995.
                http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov:80/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=7675591&dopt=Abstract

                Sandyk, R., 'Improvement of body image perception in Parkinson's disease
                by treatment with weak electromagnetic fields.', International Journal
                of Neuroscience, 82(3-4): 269-283, 1995.
                http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov:80/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=7558654&dopt=Abstract

                Sandyk, R., 'The effects of external picoTesla range magnetic fields on
                the EEG in Parkinson's disease.', International Journal of Neuroscience,
                70(1-2): 85-96, 1993.
                http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov:80/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=7960478&dopt=Abstract

                Sandyk, R., and Jacono, R.P., 'Improvement by picoTesla range magnetic
                fields of perceptual- motor performance and visual memory in a patient
                with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis.', International Journal of
                Neuroscience, Sept.78(1-2): 53-66, 1994.
                http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov:80/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=7829292&dopt=Abstract

                Frohlich, Herbert, 'Coherent Excitation in Active Biological Systems.',
                in "Modern Biochemistry", Plenum, London, 1985.

                Smith, Cyril, "Electromagnetic Man.", St. Martin's Press, New York,
                1989.

                McGinty, D.J.; Drucker-Colin, R.; Morrison, A.; Parmeggiani, P.L.;
                "Brain Mechanisms of Sleep", Raven Press, New York, 1985.

                Wageneder, F.M.; Schuy, St.; "Electrotherapeutic Sleep and
                Electroanaesthesia", Excerpta Medica Foundation, Amsterdam, 1967.

                References for Melatonin and the Pineal Gland
                http://www.aeiveos.com/diet/melatonin/mlref/pineal/

                References for Melatonin and seasonal effects
                http://www.aeiveos.com/diet/melatonin/mlref/seasonal/

                Electromagnetic Field Therapies: A Bibliography from Medline
                http://users.med.auth.gr/~karanik/english/articles/emf4.html

                EMR Reduces Melatonin in Animals and People
                http://www.energyfields.org/science/CWTI.Cherry_Melatonin_Report.doc.

                General EMF Health Effects
                http://infoventures.com/emf/topics/gen-h.html

                Healey, F; Persinger, MA; Koren, SA; 'Enhanced hypnotic suggestibility
                following application of burst-firing magnetic fields over the right
                temporoparietal lobes: a replication.', International Journal of
                Neuroscience, 87(3-4):201-7, Nov., 1996.
                http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=9003980&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

                Persinger, MA; 'On the possibility of directly accessing every human
                brain by electromagnetic induction of fundamental algorithms',
                Perceptual and Motor Skills, Jun; 80(3 Pt 1):791-9, 1995.
                http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=7567396&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

                Thompson, CJ; Yang, YS; Anderson, V; Wood, AW; 'A cooperative model for
                Ca(++) efflux windowing from cell membranes exposed to electromagnetic
                radiation.', Bioelectromagnetics, 21(6):455-64, Sept., 2000.
                http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov:80/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10972949&dopt=Abstract

                Fedorowski, A; Steciwko, A; 'Biological effects of non-ionizing
                electromagnetic radiation', Med Pr, 49(1):93-105., 1998.
                http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov:80/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=9587915&dopt=Abstract

                Eskelinen, T; Keinanen, J; Salonen, H; Juutilainen, J; 'Use of spot
                measurements for assessing residential ELF magnetic field exposure: a
                validity study.', Bioelectromagnetics, Feb;23(2):173-6, 2002.
                http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov:80/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=11835264&dopt=Abstract

                Blackman, CF; Benane, SG; House, DE; Joines, WT; 'Effects of ELF (1-120
                Hz) and modulated (50 Hz) RF fields on the efflux of calcium ions from
                brain tissue in vitro.', Bioelectromagnetics., 6(1):1-11, 1985.
                http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov:80/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=3977964&dopt=Abstract

                Blackman, CF; Benane, SG; Elliott, DJ; House, DE; Pollock, MM;
                'Influence of electromagnetic fields on the efflux of calcium ions from
                brain tissue in vitro: a three-model analysis consistent with the
                frequency response up to 510 Hz.', Bioelectromagnetics., 9(3):215-27,
                1988.
                http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov:80/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=3178897&dopt=Abstract

                Blackman, CF; Kinney, LS; House, DE; Joines, WT; 'Multiple power-density
                windows and their possible origin.', Bioelectromagnetics, 10(2):115-28,
                1989.
                http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov:80/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=2540755&dopt=Abstract

                PERSINGER, Michael A. - Citations:
                http://laurentian.ca/admn/GRAD_STUDY/FACPUBLICATIONS/PSYCHOLOGY/mpersinger.html

                Schumann Resonances, a plausible biophysical mechanism
                for the human health effects of Solar/Geomagnetic Activity
                http://www.land-sbg.gv.at/celltower/german/Cherry%20Schumann%20Resonances.pdf.


                All the Best,

                ~ Khem Caigan
                <Khem@...>
              • FHLew
                Greetings Jim wrote:
                Message 7 of 7 , Nov 7, 2002
                  Greetings

                  Jim wrote:

                  < So does anyone have any evidence that these frequencies actually
                  cause calcium ion migration? Does anyone have any evidence that calcium ion
                  migration is bad? If not, the concern over these frequencies seems
                  unwarranted. >

                  Israeli scientist Rafael Elul found that strands of protein protrude from
                  membranes into water between brain cells. In the 1960s Ahron Katchaisky,
                  biophysicist at MITs Neurosciences Research Program, found that calcium
                  binds to the end of these protein strands. Calcium ions are very prevalent
                  in brain tissue, and transmit nerve impulses.

                  These protein-calcium strands sway in response to electric currents, like
                  visible brain waves. Dr. Ross Adey says they're "senstive to electrochemical
                  breezes blowing across cell membranes - like wheat waving in wind. Rhythmic
                  waves aren't just noise, but intercellular whispers."
                  fields increased EEG action in the limbic system, an ancient part of the
                  brainstem. While 10 hz had no effect on primate behavior, seven liz caused
                  delays in reaction time. In the 1970s he found effects of low level EM at
                  seven, 45,60, and 75 liz on primates. Consistently, ELF fields as low as 1
                  vpm changed in EEG and behavior.

                  Cats - a different species - with implanted electrodes were exposed to very
                  high frequency
                  (VHF) EM of 147 million hz (Mhz). By itself, VHF EM had no effect, but
                  modulated at
                  ELF, it altered feline brainwaves. Effects were specific for sites in the
                  brain and particular
                  ELFs.

                  In 1974, as Wertheimer's leukemia study and Becker's powerline battle began
                  [see Part OneJ, Adey made a breakthrough. He exposed live chick brains to
                  low-level 147 Mhz EM, again with no effect. But ELF modulation caused up to
                  20 percent rises in calcium ion release by brain cell membranes.

                  This occurred at several specific frequencies between six and 20 hz, with a
                  maximum at 16 hz and lower responses at adjacent frequencies. This calcium
                  release follows a classic resonance curve which depends, not on EM
                  intensity, but frequency. Subsequent study revealed this narrow window
                  effect also occurs at specific field strengths and exposure times.

                  By 1976, Adey had proven that weak EM directly affects the central nervous
                  system, and theorized that ELF oscillations of protein-calcium strands are
                  cell-to-cell communication. Weak ELF EM alters calcium movement in cell
                  membranes to change neural chemical action.

                  By 1977, he'd shown that low level microwaves of 450 Mhz, modulated at six
                  hz, changes brain tissue chemistry in the cerebral cortex. This was
                  observed -- but just hOw weak EM did this remained unknown. Yet Adey's
                  discovery revolutionized science and medicine as much as the leap from
                  wire-bound telegraph to wireless radio changed the face of communications.



                  In 1979 Carl Blackman, at EPA Health Effects Research Lab biologist,
                  confirmed Adey's 16
                  liz window effect on calcium ions. Blackman found 50 Mhz (ham radio
                  frequency)
                  modulated at 15 hz also increased calcium ion release from chick brain
                  tissue.

                  Further experiments showed the power level of the internal magnetic field in
                  tissue was critical. In 1980, Blackman found that 16 liz increased calcium
                  release at two power levels, but one and 30 hz showed no effect. Then he
                  explored one to 100 hz to reveal windows at 15, 45, 75, and 105 hz, with
                  weak reactions to 30,60 and 90 hz.

                  Blackman's real discovery came in 1983. In studying frequency window
                  effects, Blackmanstumbled on the solid state physics principle of cyclotron
                  resonance - that static magnetic fields cause electric particles to move in
                  circles at a frequency related to static magnetic strength.

                  Using Helmholtz coils to create static magnetism, he cut local geomagnetism
                  in half-- and 15 hz calcium ion effects vanished. In other tests, a new
                  window appeared at 30 hz with an effect proportional to geomagnetism. In
                  Ju!y 1984, Blackman told the Bioelectromagnetics society that local
                  geomagnetism is a cntical variable m experiments, and explained why
                  researchers had trouble reproducing biomagnetic experiments -- results
                  depend on local
                  geomagnetism in each lab.
                  Many scientists repeated Blackman's experiments. Oakland University
                  physicist Abraham
                  Liboff suggested neural tissue ions are in cyclotron resonance with external
                  magnetism. He
                  altered geomagnetism to a level at which lithium ions resonate, and found
                  rats exposed to
                  60 hz had impaired response time - a behaviorial effect.


                  When all is said and done, all cellular functions are regulated by their
                  internal clocks which
                  conform to the 24 hours Night/Day circadian rhythmicity which pulsates with
                  Schumann
                  Resonances. Our body's biological clock is influenced by planetary bodies as
                  our body's
                  constituents share the common origin of solar debris in the cosmos. This is
                  manifested by the
                  wide range of physiological fluctuations due to varying composition of
                  minerals or trace minerals
                  in our bodies. In passing, it should be pointed out that in Biological
                  Transmutation [ Prof Kervran
                  of Paris University] Ca is initially absorbed,then converted to Magnesium
                  which is stored in strategic
                  regions for easy reconvertion back to Calcium,depending on the needs of the
                  individual. The quality
                  of our life depends the presence of tissue or cell salts. And calcium is
                  one.

                  With regards
                  Lew






                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: "Jim" <lucky3092@...>
                  To: <bwgen@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Wednesday, November 06, 2002 6:24 AM
                  Subject: [bwgen] Calcium ion migration


                  > Reading the comments in presets section on the bwgen site, it's
                  > obvious that at least a few people are concerned about calcium ion
                  > migration. This concern seems to originate from the "Silent Sounds"
                  > site (at http://www.mindspring.com/~silent/freqs.htm) which has the
                  > following entry:
                  >
                  > 9,11,16XXX documented calcium ion migration (brain tissue)
                  >
                  > They provide no clue where this migration is "documented." In my
                  > searching, I have found no information about this effect. It looks
                  > like every reference I've found is based on the Silent Sounds entry
                  > I mentioned.
                  >
                  > Mike's list (and all its derivatives) say that these frequencies
                  > are "bad," but the Silent Sounds site doesn't give any indication on
                  > whether calcium ion migration is a good or bad thing. (For example,
                  > calcium ion migration away from arthitic joints is a good thing, as
                  > is calcium ion migration towards a mending broken bone.)
                  >
                  > So does anyone have any evidence that these frequencies actually
                  > cause calcium ion migration? Does anyone have any evidence that
                  > calcium ion migration is bad? If not, the concern over these
                  > frequencies seems unwarranted.
                  >
                  > - Jim
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  > bwgen-unsubscribe@egroups.com
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  >
                  >
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