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Re: Surname Pituch vs Hujsak

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  • David Hojsak
    Debbie, Confusing is my middle name when it come to searching my family history. Why not add more to it? Without the advent of the Internet and discussion
    Message 1 of 12 , Sep 1, 2010
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      Debbie,
      "Confusing" is my middle name when it come to searching my family history. Why not add more to it? Without the advent of the Internet and discussion groups and webistes such as the wonderful BT Triangle (what a godsend--thank you all!) and Semanchuk.com, and of course your work, I would have continued going through life thinking that I was the only one to carry on the family name.

      Incomplete family research done many years ago by a distant cousin who I never met (a descendent of Jozef and Marianna), shows a Marcin Pituch (1806-1864) as the father of a Pawel (1844-1918), who is the father of a Josef (1896-1916 a Hujsak whose death certificate I have thanks to Ann Poslosky), a Jan (1880-1925--my grandfather--also a Hujsak whose death certificate I have thanks to Ann), and several others.

      I know this is confusing, and you are so right, I need to post on the BT Group site my family tree, as I understand it, if I want to make connections, particularly since it's been a long time of inactivity on my part from when I first introduced myself to the Group, and many new members have joined subsequently. That will be in a separate posting. We need to simplify things in life!

      Thanks for your reply.

      David Hojsak
      Moorestown, NJ



      --- In bukowsko_triangle@yahoogroups.com, Debbie Greenlee <daveg@...> wrote:
      >
      > David,
      >
      > Uh, not to make this anymore confusing than it already is but
      > Jo~zef's baptismal record lists his father as Pawel~ Pituch not
      > Hujsak. Mother's name was Marianna Zytka, daughter of Michal~ Zytka
      > and Katarzyna Podwapin~ska.
      >
      > Also, when Pawel~ married Maria (Marianna) Zytka in 1867 he was listed
      > as Pawel~ Pituch and his father is listed as Marcin Pituch, mother is
      > Anna Hnat. The Marriage Banns indicate the same with no mention of
      > Hujsak. Perhaps the change to Hujsak came after Jo~zef Pituch was born?
      >
      > I think you might get better results from people if you listed some of
      > the family line in a new email rather than suggest that they go
      > looking for your posts. The easier you make it for people, the more
      > likely you are to find relatives.
      >
      > Debbie
      >
      > d.hojsak wrote:
      > > Dear BT Members,
      > >
      > > With all this Hujsak/Pituch discussion taking place, I just had to chime in. Although it's been about 4 years since I have been active with the BT group, I have been following the many discussions taking place here. Although I have not been able to make any connections to anyone here yet, many times I feel like I'm on the cusp of doing so.
      > >
      > > I am descendent of Hujsaks via Jersey City, with some sort of connection to Rome, NY, but I have not been able to go beyond there in the US. As such, I know I must have "cousins" all over the place, but I have not had the time to make those connections.
      > >
      > > However, this Hujsak/Pituch discussion may provide that opportunity. I believe this may have come up before with this group, and here it is again. Anyway, a Josef Hujsak, alias Pituch (DOB March 3, 1869) is my grandfather's (Jan Hujsak) brother, whose parents were Pawel Hujsak and Marianna Zytka.
      > >
      > > I hope this little bit of information is helpful in helping us connect. For more details of my Hujsak roots, please refer back to the correspondence I had with the BT group starting in 2006 under the subject of "Hojsak/Hujsak (Jersey City, NJ - Allentown, PA)
      > >
      > > David Hojsak
      > > Moorestown, NJ
      > >
      >
    • jcw@op.pl
      Debbie, Yes, name Hujsak sounds a bit odd, particularly if you split the name Hujsak on two parts: Hujsak = Huj + sak. In translation you will get - Huj =
      Message 2 of 12 , Sep 1, 2010
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        Debbie,

        Yes, name Hujsak sounds a bit odd, particularly if you split the name Hujsak
        on two parts:
        Hujsak = Huj + sak. In translation you will get - "Huj" = male sex organ
        (penis) but in very vulgar meaning and "sak" = sack, bag. Connection these
        two words in polish gives a lot of interpretation possibilities.
        Probably for this reason, family Hujsak from Bukowsko, has changed (about
        1970) this name for Helinski about.

        As for Pituch; this name has no special meaning, is neutral. Probably the
        name Pituch come from Russian, Ukrainian or Lemko language, in Rusian word
        "pietuch" means cock, rooster and in polish means kogut.

        Jurek

        bukowsko_triangle@yahoogroups.com napisa�(a):

        To the _Polish_ speakers on the list:

        Does the _word_ hujsak sound odd to you? (ignore the meaning)
        Does the word pituch have a meaning to you?

        Do you know of any reason why a man named Hujsak would change his name
        to Pituch? Maybe not today, but a long time ago?

        To UKES or LEMKO:
        What does the word "pit" or "pituch" mean, if anything?

        I am still trying to figure out why people would change their surnames
        from one to the other.

        Thanks
        Debbie




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      • Debbie Greenlee
        Jurek, I have been consulting Fred Hoffman (linguist, author) about this question and he said about the same thing as you. Fred also wondered this: If I
        Message 3 of 12 , Sep 1, 2010
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          Jurek,

          I have been consulting Fred Hoffman (linguist, author) about this
          question and he said about the same thing as you.

          Fred also wondered this:
          "If I absolutely had to guess, I'd guess
          the name Hujsak developed by adding -ak to the root Hujs-, which
          sounds German or Dutch to me. In other words, Hujs-ak, not Huj-sak
          -- and therefore nothing vulgar about it at all. But it may have
          SOUNDED dirty to the priest."

          "It just goes to show, though, that when people try to figure what a
          name means, they tend to assume the worst. And that's why it just may
          be possible a priest would think Pituch was a bit less scandalous than
          Hujsak -- even though Pituch is definitely connected with a vulgar
          word, whereas Hujsak may only sound like it is."


          I just want to know why people in Bukowsko would change their surname
          from Hujsak (found in early records as Huysak) tp Pituch or in David's
          family's case, from Pituch to Hujsak! :)

          Debbie


          jcw@... wrote:
          > Debbie,
          >
          > Yes, name Hujsak sounds a bit odd, particularly if you split the name Hujsak
          > on two parts:
          > Hujsak = Huj + sak. In translation you will get - "Huj" = male sex organ
          > (penis) but in very vulgar meaning and "sak" = sack, bag. Connection these
          > two words in polish gives a lot of interpretation possibilities.
          > Probably for this reason, family Hujsak from Bukowsko, has changed (about
          > 1970) this name for Helinski about.
          >
          > As for Pituch; this name has no special meaning, is neutral. Probably the
          > name Pituch come from Russian, Ukrainian or Lemko language, in Rusian word
          > "pietuch" means cock, rooster and in polish means kogut.
          >
          > Jurek
          >
          > bukowsko_triangle@yahoogroups.com napisa�(a):
          >
          > To the _Polish_ speakers on the list:
          >
          > Does the _word_ hujsak sound odd to you? (ignore the meaning)
          > Does the word pituch have a meaning to you?
          >
          > Do you know of any reason why a man named Hujsak would change his name
          > to Pituch? Maybe not today, but a long time ago?
          >
          > To UKES or LEMKO:
          > What does the word "pit" or "pituch" mean, if anything?
          >
          > I am still trying to figure out why people would change their surnames
          > from one to the other.
          >
          > Thanks
          > Debbie
          >
        • nancy sherwood
          ________________________________ From: Corinna W. Caudill To: bukowsko_triangle@yahoogroups.com Sent: Mon, August 30, 2010 11:58:02 AM
          Message 4 of 12 , Sep 3, 2010
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            ________________________________
            From: Corinna W. Caudill <wengryn@...>
            To: bukowsko_triangle@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Mon, August 30, 2010 11:58:02 AM
            Subject: [bukowsko_triangle] Surname Pituch - Yes, I believe it's Lemko

             
            Yes.  The surname Pituch is Lemko. 
            There were Pituchs in Wola Piotrowa.  One of my great aunts (whom I'm not in
            touch with, but who is still alive) was a Volians'kyji (Wolansky) who married a
            Pituch.
            I also know that it was a Pituch who was the "village counselor" (kind of like a

            mayor I guess?) of Wola Piotrowa at the time of the deportations (1946), a fact
            that I learned from my interviews with Lemkos.

            Maybe all of this is TMI.  But def. a Lemko surname.  I believe that this was
            either a large family or there were many families with the same name in the
            Sianik (Sanok) county area prior to the deportations.

            C-

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            Hi, I haven't posted in a while, but this struck a chord with me. My grandmother
            was Maria Labant from Wola Piotrowa. Her father was Steve Labant and her mother
            Eva Homerda. The family story was that when Steve went to America the family
            fell on hard times. My grandmother said she helped raise goats and the family
            was taken in by the mayor of the town. My mom doesn't know much of the family
            history but the two names of "cousins" she knows are Wengryn and Pituch. I don't
            know if the connection between Pituch and mayor means anything but I found it
            interesting.
             
            Nancy Sherwood
            Researching Chruszcz, Labant, Homerda, Gutyez, Wengryn, Szpynda and Pituch from
            Wola Piotrowa




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