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Re: [bukowsko_triangle] Re: Zabiega

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  • Debbie Greenlee
    Jan, Dzie~kuje~ for all of your information. I don t think I scanned enough of the document to include the year of the marriage but it was 1832 between Jakob
    Message 1 of 9 , Apr 4, 2008
      Jan,

      Dzie~kuje~ for all of your information.

      I don't think I scanned enough of the document to include the year of
      the marriage but it was 1832 between Jakob Zydka and Marianna
      Podwapinska. Zydka eventually was spelled Z~ytka.

      Debbie

      jan_cesarczyk wrote:
      > Debbie,
      >
      > The answer is yes it could. Roman's answer is very correct in very
      > literary Polish. However in the Galician records that I've looked at
      > there are very many variations in the name used for Mr Zabiega's
      > daughter including this one. "onka" on the end of the surname
      > indicates "daughter of". "g" changes to "z" frequently in Polish.
      >
      > In some previous posts there was talk of interchangability of y and
      > j. Current Polish rules were finally established only in 1936. Before
      > about 1830 it was a complete free for all, you just wrote things as
      > you wanted. Nothing was wrong. Then there were moves to standardise
      > spelling and over next 100 years various spelling rules were
      > introduced including that "y" was only used as a vowel.
      >
      > Jan
      >
      >
      >>> Debbie Greenlee wrote:
      >>>> Would someone tell me if a woman's maiden name is Zabiega would
      > that
      >>>> appear as Zabizonka in a record which lists her as the mother of
      > a bride?
      >>>> Thank you
      >>>> Debbie
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • Roman
      I agree that the entry is indeed ZABIEZONKA (not Zabizonka). And this variation makes more sense than the originally spelled query. I also believe that the
      Message 2 of 9 , Apr 4, 2008
        I agree that the entry is indeed ZABIEZONKA (not Zabizonka). And this
        variation makes more sense than the originally spelled query. I also
        believe that the rules for forming these endings are partly based on
        simple preference, not unlike choosing one of a large collection of
        diminutives that can be formed in the Polish language.

        Is this variation mentioned in Fred Hoffman's examples of name endings?

        Roman

        jan_cesarczyk wrote:
        > Debbie,
        >
        > The answer is yes it could. Roman's answer is very correct in very
        > literary Polish. However in the Galician records that I've looked at
        > there are very many variations in the name used for Mr Zabiega's
        > daughter including this one. "onka" on the end of the surname
        > indicates "daughter of". "g" changes to "z" frequently in Polish.
        >
        > In some previous posts there was talk of interchangability of y and
        > j. Current Polish rules were finally established only in 1936. Before
        > about 1830 it was a complete free for all, you just wrote things as
        > you wanted. Nothing was wrong. Then there were moves to standardise
        > spelling and over next 100 years various spelling rules were
        > introduced including that "y" was only used as a vowel.
        >
        > Jan
        >
        >
        >>> Debbie Greenlee wrote:
        >>>> Would someone tell me if a woman's maiden name is Zabiega would
        > that
        >>>> appear as Zabizonka in a record which lists her as the mother of
        > a bride?
        >>>> Thank you
        >>>> Debbie
        >
        >
        >
      • Debbie Greenlee
        Roman, Hoffman does mention anka as a feminine surname suffix. I suppose that is why I guessed that Zabiezonka was Zabiega but the dropping of the g was
        Message 3 of 9 , Apr 4, 2008
          Roman,

          Hoffman does mention 'anka' as a feminine surname suffix. I suppose
          that is why I guessed that Zabiezonka was Zabiega but the dropping of
          the 'g' was enough to make me question my reasoning.

          Debbie

          Roman wrote:
          > I agree that the entry is indeed ZABIEZONKA (not Zabizonka). And this
          > variation makes more sense than the originally spelled query. I also
          > believe that the rules for forming these endings are partly based on
          > simple preference, not unlike choosing one of a large collection of
          > diminutives that can be formed in the Polish language.
          >
          > Is this variation mentioned in Fred Hoffman's examples of name endings?
          >
          > Roman
          >
          > jan_cesarczyk wrote:
          >> Debbie,
          >>
          >> The answer is yes it could. Roman's answer is very correct in very
          >> literary Polish. However in the Galician records that I've looked at
          >> there are very many variations in the name used for Mr Zabiega's
          >> daughter including this one. "onka" on the end of the surname
          >> indicates "daughter of". "g" changes to "z" frequently in Polish.
          >>
          >> In some previous posts there was talk of interchangability of y and
          >> j. Current Polish rules were finally established only in 1936. Before
          >> about 1830 it was a complete free for all, you just wrote things as
          >> you wanted. Nothing was wrong. Then there were moves to standardise
          >> spelling and over next 100 years various spelling rules were
          >> introduced including that "y" was only used as a vowel.
          >>
          >> Jan
          >>
          >>
          >>>> Debbie Greenlee wrote:
          >>>>> Would someone tell me if a woman's maiden name is Zabiega would
          >> that
          >>>>> appear as Zabizonka in a record which lists her as the mother of
          >> a bride?
          >>>>> Thank you
          >>>>> Debbie
          >>
          >>
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • jan_cesarczyk
          On the Zabiega scan, I noticed the abreviation 9ber for November and I wondered whether many of you were familiar with these abbreviations. 7ber - September
          Message 4 of 9 , Apr 6, 2008
            On the Zabiega scan, I noticed the abreviation "9ber" for November and
            I wondered whether many of you were familiar with these abbreviations.

            7ber - September
            8ber - October
            9ber - November
            10ber = December

            On adiferent subject,there is an article on the history of Polish
            speling at http://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Historia_ortografii_polskiej
            It is in Polish and I realise that most of you will not be able to
            understand it, but you can at least see some examples.

            Jan
          • Debbie Greenlee
            Jan, Yes, those are common in records written in Latin. Just makes it fun but confusing because today we think of the 7th month as being July (lipca). The
            Message 5 of 9 , Apr 6, 2008
              Jan,

              Yes, those are common in records written in Latin. Just makes it fun
              but confusing because today we think of the 7th month as being July
              (lipca). The difference is that 7ber is really an abbreviation for the
              Latin word for September which is "September" and which refers back to
              the Julian calendar when the year started in March. Just one more
              thing to remember.

              Debbie

              jan_cesarczyk wrote:
              > On the Zabiega scan, I noticed the abreviation "9ber" for November and
              > I wondered whether many of you were familiar with these abbreviations.
              >
              > 7ber - September
              > 8ber - October
              > 9ber - November
              > 10ber = December
              >
              > On adiferent subject,there is an article on the history of Polish
              > speling at http://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Historia_ortografii_polskiej
              > It is in Polish and I realise that most of you will not be able to
              > understand it, but you can at least see some examples.
              >
              > Jan
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
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