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Agata Zadylak

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  • Janet George
    Hi: I am new to the group. I am trying to trace my great grandmother’s family here in the USA and back to Poland. My cousin had done most of the research
    Message 1 of 10 , Apr 4, 2008
      Hi:
      I am new to the group. I am trying to trace my great grandmother�s family here in the USA and back to Poland. My cousin had done most of the research to date and now I am trying to add to it. The information that I have is as follows:
      Agata Katarzyna Zadylak was born about 1880 in Bukowsko, Sanok, Lwow, Poland/Austria. She immigrated to Philadelphia about 1900. According to her marriage certificate, her parents were Hiacynt or Hyacinth or Hiacenth (father) and Magdalena or Magdalene (mother). Agata married Antoni Stanislaw Niedzwiedz in St. Mary�s Immaculate Conception Church, N. 207 Jane St., Carnegie, Pennsylvania on November 17, 1902. Witnesses were Janus Krzasz and Theodr Kurczynski. Antoni Niedzwiedz was from Kniesiolo, B�brka, Poland/Austria.
      At some point after 1904, but before 1908 Agata and Antoni moved to Sayreville, Middlesex County, New Jersey and eventually settled in Old Bridge, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Agata and Antoni had five children with one of them dying at under the age of one year. In approximately 1939, the family name was legally changed from Niedzwiedz to Niedwich.
      As for other relatives, we think that she had a brother, Vasil Zadylak, a sister, Magda Zadylak, and a sister, Maryanna Zadylak, who was born about 1895 in Bukowsko. Maryanna visited in 1910, 1912 and 1913 according Ellis Island records. We also think that Agata had family in the Pittsburgh area since that is where she was married.
      Any information on this family would be most welcome.
      Thank you.
      Janet


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    • Debbie Greenlee
      Janet, There was also a Marianna Zadylak born December 4, 1894 to Jan Zadylak and Agata Kseniak. (Bapt 2005 DSCF0841) This might be yours. Unfortunately,
      Message 2 of 10 , Apr 4, 2008
        Janet,

        There was also a Marianna Zadylak born December 4, 1894 to Jan Zadylak
        and Agata Kseniak. (Bapt 2005 DSCF0841) This might be "yours."

        Unfortunately, there aren't any baptismal records between 1878-1892.
        They may exist, but they aren't in the Bukowsko church. I am hoping to
        verify the records held at the USC in Bukowsko during my trip.

        In order to look for the other records you'll need to place "an order"
        but I don't think I'll have time to do the research before I leave on
        Tuesday.

        Debbie

        Janet George wrote:
        > Hi:
        > I am new to the group. I am trying to trace my great grandmother’s
        family here in the USA and back to Poland. My cousin had done most of
        the research to date and now I am trying to add to it. The information
        that I have is as follows:

        > Agata Katarzyna Zadylak was born about 1880 in Bukowsko, Sanok, Lwow,
        Poland/Austria. She immigrated to Philadelphia about 1900. According
        to her marriage certificate, her parents were Hiacynt or Hyacinth or
        Hiacenth (father) and Magdalena or Magdalene (mother). Agata married
        Antoni Stanislaw Niedzwiedz in St. Mary’s Immaculate Conception Church,
        N. 207 Jane St., Carnegie, Pennsylvania on November 17, 1902. Witnesses
        were Janus Krzasz and Theodr Kurczynski. Antoni Niedzwiedz was from
        Kniesiolo, Bóbrka, Poland/Austria.

        > At some point after 1904, but before 1908 Agata and Antoni moved to
        Sayreville, Middlesex County, New Jersey and eventually settled in Old
        Bridge, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Agata and Antoni had five
        children with one of them dying at under the age of one year.

        In approximately 1939, the family name was legally changed from
        Niedzwiedz to Niedwich.

        > As for other relatives, we think that she had a brother, Vasil Zadylak,
        a sister, Magda Zadylak, and a sister, Maryanna Zadylak, who was born
        about 1895 in Bukowsko. Maryanna visited in 1910, 1912 and 1913
        according Ellis Island records. We also think that Agata had family in
        the Pittsburgh area since that is where she was married.
        > Any information on this family would be most welcome.
        > Thank you.
        > Janet
        >
      • Philip Semanchuk
        ... Hi Janet, Welcome to the list! You might want to search the list archives for Zadylak because the name has come up a number of times. You can search the
        Message 3 of 10 , Apr 6, 2008
          On Apr 4, 2008, at 8:42 PM, Janet George wrote:
          > Hi:
          > I am new to the group. I am trying to trace my great grandmotherís
          > family here in the USA and back to Poland. My cousin had done most
          > of the research to date and now I am trying to add to it. The
          > information that I have is as follows:
          > Agata Katarzyna Zadylak was born about 1880 in Bukowsko, Sanok,
          > Lwow, Poland/Austria. She immigrated to Philadelphia about 1900.
          > According to her marriage certificate, her parents were Hiacynt or
          > Hyacinth or Hiacenth (father) and Magdalena or Magdalene (mother).
          > Agata married Antoni Stanislaw Niedzwiedz in St. Maryís Immaculate
          > Conception Church, N. 207 Jane St., Carnegie, Pennsylvania on
          > November 17, 1902. Witnesses were Janus Krzasz and Theodr
          > Kurczynski. Antoni Niedzwiedz was from Kniesiolo, BÛbrka, Poland/
          > Austria.
          > At some point after 1904, but before 1908 Agata and Antoni moved to
          > Sayreville, Middlesex County, New Jersey and eventually settled in
          > Old Bridge, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Agata and Antoni had
          > five children with one of them dying at under the age of one year.
          > In approximately 1939, the family name was legally changed from
          > Niedzwiedz to Niedwich.
          > As for other relatives, we think that she had a brother, Vasil
          > Zadylak, a sister, Magda Zadylak, and a sister, Maryanna Zadylak,
          > who was born about 1895 in Bukowsko. Maryanna visited in 1910,
          > 1912 and 1913 according Ellis Island records. We also think that
          > Agata had family in the Pittsburgh area since that is where she was
          > married.
          > Any information on this family would be most welcome.

          Hi Janet,
          Welcome to the list! You might want to search the list archives for
          Zadylak because the name has come up a number of times. You can
          search the archives from here:
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bukowsko_triangle/messages


          Cheers
          Philip
        • Mailkimg2@aol.com
          Hi everyone, I m just curious. Why is it that Sayreville, New Jersey was a destination for so many people in the BT?  Is it simply that one of the villagers
          Message 4 of 10 , Apr 6, 2008
            Hi everyone,



            I'm just curious.




            Why is it that Sayreville, New Jersey was a destination for so many people in the BT?  Is it simply that one of the villagers stumbled upon it and liked it?  And once word made it back that perhaps, work was available, others decided to give it a try as well?




            Having been a member here for several years now, this little fact still fascinates me.




            Blessings,

            Kim  :)


            -----Original Message-----
            From: Philip Semanchuk <philip@...>
            To: bukowsko_triangle@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Sun, 6 Apr 2008 10:27 am
            Subject: Re: [bukowsko_triangle] Agata Zadylak






























            On Apr 4, 2008, at 8:42 PM, Janet George wrote:

            > Hi:

            > I am new to the group. I am trying to trace my great grandmotherís

            > family here in the USA and back to Poland. My cousin had done most

            > of the research to date and now I am trying to add to it. The

            > information that I have is as follows:

            > Agata Katarzyna Zadylak was born about 1880 in Bukowsko, Sanok,

            > Lwow, Poland/Austria. She immigrated to Philadelphia about 1900.

            > According to her marriage certificate, her parents were Hiacynt or

            > Hyacinth or Hiacenth (father) and Magdalena or Magdalene (mother).

            > Agata married Antoni Stanislaw Niedzwiedz in St. Maryís Immaculate

            > Conception Church, N. 207 Jane St., Carnegie, Pennsylvania on

            > November 17, 1902. Witnesses were Janus Krzasz and Theodr

            > Kurczynski. Antoni Niedzwiedz was from Kniesiolo, BÛbrka, Poland/

            > Austria.

            > At some point after 1904, but before 1908 Agata and Antoni moved to

            > Sayreville, Middlesex County, New Jersey and eventually settled in

            > Old Bridge, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Agata and Antoni had

            > five children with one of them dying at under the age of one year.

            > In approximately 1939, the family name was legally changed from

            > Niedzwiedz to Niedwich.

            > As for other relatives, we think that she had a brother, Vasil

            > Zadylak, a sister, Magda Zadylak, and a sister, Maryanna Zadylak,

            > who was born about 1895 in Bukowsko. Maryanna visited in 1910,

            > 1912 and 1913 according Ellis Island records. We also think that

            > Agata had family in the Pittsburgh area since that is where she was

            > married.

            > Any information on this family would be most welcome.



            Hi Janet,

            Welcome to the list! You might want to search the list archives for

            Zadylak because the name has come up a number of times. You can

            search the archives from here:

            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bukowsko_triangle/messages



            Cheers

            Philip





























            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Debbie Greenlee
            Kim, I think that s just what happened. With regards to Pennsylvania I think it was the coal mines. Hard to imagine someone would leave their country to work
            Message 5 of 10 , Apr 7, 2008
              Kim,

              I think that's just what happened.
              With regards to Pennsylvania I think it was the coal mines. Hard to
              imagine someone would leave their country to work in a coal mine, but
              back then things were better here than they were in Poland.

              Debbie

              Mailkimg2@... wrote:
              > Hi everyone,
              >
              > I'm just curious.
              >
              > Why is it that Sayreville, New Jersey was a destination for so many
              people in the BT? Is it simply that one of the villagers stumbled
              upon it and liked it? And once word made it back that perhaps, work
              was available, others decided to give it a try as well?
              > Having been a member here for several years now, this little fact
              still fascinates me.
              >
              > Blessings,
              >
              > Kim :)
            • Mailkimg2@aol.com
              Have a fabulous and fruitful journey, Debbie!  Many blessings to you along the way!! Kim :) ... From: Debbie Greenlee To:
              Message 6 of 10 , Apr 7, 2008
                Have a fabulous and fruitful journey, Debbie!  Many blessings to you along the way!!



                Kim :)


                -----Original Message-----
                From: Debbie Greenlee <daveg@...>
                To: bukowsko_triangle@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Mon, 7 Apr 2008 5:29 pm
                Subject: Re: [bukowsko_triangle] Agata Zadylak




























                Kim,



                I think that's just what happened.

                With regards to Pennsylvania I think it was the coal mines. Hard to

                imagine someone would leave their country to work in a coal mine, but

                back then things were better here than they were in Poland.



                Debbie



                Mailkimg2@... wrote:

                > Hi everyone,

                >

                > I'm just curious.

                >

                > Why is it that Sayreville, New Jersey was a destination for so many

                people in the BT? Is it simply that one of the villagers stumbled

                upon it and liked it? And once word made it back that perhaps, work

                was available, others decided to give it a try as well?

                > Having been a member here for several years now, this little fact

                still fascinates me.

                >

                > Blessings,

                >

                > Kim :)
































                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Philip Semanchuk
                ... I ve seen this with a number of towns, like Jersey City, which James mentioned in his recent mail, New Britain CT, and Rome NY. I m curious too. My guess
                Message 7 of 10 , Apr 8, 2008
                  On Apr 6, 2008, at 4:25 PM, Mailkimg2@... wrote:

                  > Why is it that Sayreville, New Jersey was a destination for so many
                  > people in the BT? Is it simply that one of the villagers stumbled
                  > upon it and liked it? And once word made it back that perhaps,
                  > work was available, others decided to give it a try as well?

                  I've seen this with a number of towns, like Jersey City, which James
                  mentioned in his recent mail, New Britain CT, and Rome NY. I'm
                  curious too. My guess is that a few immigrants found there way there,
                  got jobs, observed that there was more work available, and sent
                  letters home telling their cousins, neighbors, etc. about the
                  availability of work and housing. More came over and the process
                  repeated.

                  It still doesn't answer your question of why the ball started rolling
                  in Sayreville as opposed to Trenton or Morristown or West Orange or
                  somewhere in Pennsylvania or New York or Maryland. I don't know the
                  answer to that! I wonder if you could read a history of Sayreville or
                  even contact the city itself and ask? Maybe they had a bunch of
                  mills, or one of the shipping company owners lived in Sayreville.

                  bye
                  P
                • Mailkimg2@aol.com
                  I have a couple books about Sayreville history so I ll go through them again.  I know that Sayreville had a brick company and there was a
                  Message 8 of 10 , Apr 8, 2008
                    I have a couple books about Sayreville history so I'll go through them again.  I know that Sayreville had a brick company and there was a large Polish community forming in its earliest days.  I wonder what employment opportunities were taken up by others from the BT; maybe that would show a common thread?  I don't know.



                    Thanks Philip,

                    Kim :)


                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: Philip Semanchuk <philip@...>
                    To: bukowsko_triangle@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Tue, 8 Apr 2008 9:03 am
                    Subject: Re: [bukowsko_triangle] Agata Zadylak






























                    On Apr 6, 2008, at 4:25 PM, Mailkimg2@... wrote:



                    > Why is it that Sayreville, New Jersey was a destination for so many

                    > people in the BT? Is it simply that one of the villagers stumbled

                    > upon it and liked it? And once word made it back that perhaps,

                    > work was available, others decided to give it a try as well?



                    I've seen this with a number of towns, like Jersey City, which James

                    mentioned in his recent mail, New Britain CT, and Rome NY. I'm

                    curious too. My guess is that a few immigrants found there way there,

                    got jobs, observed that there was more work available, and sent

                    letters home telling their cousins, neighbors, etc. about the

                    availability of work and housing. More came over and the process

                    repeated.



                    It still doesn't answer your question of why the ball started rolling

                    in Sayreville as opposed to Trenton or Morristown or West Orange or

                    somewhere in Pennsylvania or New York or Maryland. I don't know the

                    answer to that! I wonder if you could read a history of Sayreville or

                    even contact the city itself and ask? Maybe they had a bunch of

                    mills, or one of the shipping company owners lived in Sayreville.



                    bye

                    P
































                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Philip Semanchuk
                    ... In the census, a person s occupation is usually listed. If you look up all of your Sayreville people in the census, maybe you could get an idea of where
                    Message 9 of 10 , Apr 8, 2008
                      On Apr 8, 2008, at 10:11 AM, Mailkimg2@... wrote:
                      > I have a couple books about Sayreville history so I'll go through
                      > them again. I know that Sayreville had a brick company and there
                      > was a large Polish community forming in its earliest days. I
                      > wonder what employment opportunities were taken up by others from
                      > the BT; maybe that would show a common thread? I don't know.

                      In the census, a person's occupation is usually listed. If you look
                      up all of your Sayreville people in the census, maybe you could get
                      an idea of where they were employed.

                      P
                    • Debbie Greenlee
                      Janet, The baptismal record for your great grandmother, Agata Zadylak, (DOB 1880) may not be available. I suggest you write to pral. dr. Borcz at the Przemys~l
                      Message 10 of 10 , May 20, 2008
                        Janet,

                        The baptismal record for your great grandmother, Agata Zadylak, (DOB
                        1880) may not be available. I suggest you write to pral. dr. Borcz at
                        the Przemys~l Archdiocesan Archives and ask him for her baptismal
                        record. If he does not have it in his Bukowsko record book then
                        "we'll" have to continue your research going around that record. For
                        example we could look for siblings baptismal records (hoping some were
                        born before her) and/or her parents' marriage record.

                        Your request of pral. dr. Borcz must be in Polish. If you need a
                        translation guide let us know. There are plenty online that work.
                        Send your request, without money to:
                        pral. ks. Borcz
                        Archiwum Archdiecezjalne w Premyslu
                        Pl. Katedralny 4A
                        37-700 Przemys~l
                        Poland


                        Now, if that doesn't work and/or you want to look for more records,
                        please read the following which was posted to the Bukowsko Triangle
                        list on November 16, 2007.

                        Fees For Copies of Bukowsko Church Records

                        I started filming the Bukowsko church record books in 2005. I will
                        finish in April, 2008. This will be a total of 19 books. These books
                        or copies of these books have not been filmed by LDS and are not held
                        at any archive in Poland. A few volunteers (including one not on this
                        list) are helping me transcribe and translate the records into
                        English. This is an incredibly slow process. We started translating
                        the first marriage book in the fall of 2006 and we are almost
                        finished. It was one of the shortest books.

                        Once a book is translated, the translation, in column format will be
                        placed on Philip's Bukowsko Triangle web site (not to be confused with
                        the BT list web site). The digital images will stay in my possession
                        with a copy being returned to ks. Kudl~a in Bukowsko. The images may
                        not be reproduced on the internet.

                        Since I am the keeper of the books, so to speak, I am the go-to person
                        if you would like a look-up. Once the books are translated and put
                        on line the process will be much easier and cheaper. Since the priest
                        will not be receiving donations for doing look-ups and research (a
                        double edged sword for having his load lightened) I felt it only fair
                        that I charge for this service and give the money to the priest.

                        Here is the FEE SCHEDULE:

                        To search five years of records for one record/person will cost $5.00.
                        For $5.00 the person will be sent via email a copy of the cover of the
                        book as well as the record itself. If I locate the record, you will
                        receive a scan of as much of the page as is necessary to show your
                        record as well as the page number. Every record after that from that
                        same book is still $5.00 but you won't receive another book cover. The
                        fee is non-refundable regardless of whether the record/person is
                        found. Payment is in advance. Contact Debbie Greenlee
                        daveg@... for more information.

                        Translating one of the above records is extra and will be based on the
                        record itself. However, the records are mostly in Latin and in
                        columnar format so they are fairly easy to figure out once you get
                        used to the handwriting.

                        Once a book is translated and on line, it will cost $2.00 per name to
                        locate the record and send you a scan of the record and the book
                        cover. However, I will need all of the identifying information as it
                        appears in the translated document, including type of book, volume
                        number of book, dates of book, page number and the person's name.

                        It will cost extra if a person wants the images mailed to them.

                        The images are copyrighted and due to an agreement with the parish
                        priest, these can not be placed on the internet. I will however, allow
                        the images to be published in one's personal genealogy which appears
                        in print, not on the internet.

                        Those people who transcribe/translate a minimum of 30 pages of records
                        for this project will be given free copies of records.

                        If you have any questions regarding this project please do not
                        hesitate to contact me.

                        Debbie
                        I reserve the right to update, correct or add-to the above information.



                        Janet George wrote:
                        > Hi:
                        > I am new to the group. I am trying to trace my great grandmother’s family here in the USA and back to Poland. My cousin had done most of the research to date and now I am trying to add to it. The information that I have is as follows:
                        > Agata Katarzyna Zadylak was born about 1880 in Bukowsko, Sanok, Lwow, Poland/Austria. She immigrated to Philadelphia about 1900. According to her marriage certificate, her parents were Hiacynt or Hyacinth or Hiacenth (father) and Magdalena or Magdalene (mother). Agata married Antoni Stanislaw Niedzwiedz in St. Mary’s Immaculate Conception Church, N. 207 Jane St., Carnegie, Pennsylvania on November 17, 1902. Witnesses were Janus Krzasz and Theodr Kurczynski. Antoni Niedzwiedz was from Kniesiolo, Bóbrka, Poland/Austria.
                        > At some point after 1904, but before 1908 Agata and Antoni moved to Sayreville, Middlesex County, New Jersey and eventually settled in Old Bridge, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Agata and Antoni had five children with one of them dying at under the age of one year. In approximately 1939, the family name was legally changed from Niedzwiedz to Niedwich.
                        > As for other relatives, we think that she had a brother, Vasil Zadylak, a sister, Magda Zadylak, and a sister, Maryanna Zadylak, who was born about 1895 in Bukowsko. Maryanna visited in 1910, 1912 and 1913 according Ellis Island records. We also think that Agata had family in the Pittsburgh area since that is where she was married.
                        > Any information on this family would be most welcome.
                        > Thank you.
                        > Janet
                        >
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