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Re: [bukowsko_triangle] Kostic/Kwarciak Draft Registration 1920 Census Files

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  • Debbie Greenlee
    Denise, I started this so long ago I hope it isn t redundant. We need to isolate spellings for Kostik and find the earliest U.S. documents which would list an
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 2, 2006
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      Denise,

      I started this so long ago I hope it isn't redundant.

      We need to isolate spellings for Kostik and find the earliest U.S.
      documents which would list an "original" spelling.

      I think the surname in the 1920 Pennsylvania census is spelled,
      "Kostik" though that doesn't mean it was soundexed/indexed that way.
      If you compare the last letter of the surname on the census with the
      'k' in the name, "Baker" on line 32, you'll see that the enumerator
      finishes off his 'Ks' with "new" strokes, as if he is printing and not
      using cursive.

      Looking at who the brothers are living with, it looks like the
      enumerator wrote down "Kavarciak". Unless you know differently, this
      could be the enumerator's phonetic spelling of what was actually used
      by John and Anna Kwarciak at that time. (more fun for you)

      On the WWI Draft Registration records, what DOB is listed for the
      George you located? What is the registration number so we can look at
      the same one as you.

      Since the George and Nick (not sure this is what is written on the
      census for the brother's given name) Kostik on the 1920 census both
      indicate that they are NOT citizens, chances are they didn't fight in
      WWI. You do have their arrival dates in the U.S. though, 1908 and 1913
      respectively. Of course, since they're in Pennsylvania they could have
      used any number of arrival ports so several should be checked.

      The 1910 Federal census for Pennsylvania should be checked to see if
      George Kostik appears. Also the 1930 census for both George and Nick
      should be checked. We're trying to find out if either brother became a
      citizen.

      Since Anna Kostic(k) Kwarciak was naturalized in 1913 (according to
      the 1920 census), she must have become a citizen under her husband's
      application. Locate John Kwarciak's (Kvarciak) Declaration of Intent
      and his Petition for Naturalization to see how his wife's name was
      listed. Hopefully it will have her maiden name and perhaps her place
      of birth. From John's citizenship papers you might be able to locate
      Anna's Passenger Arrival Record.

      Don't know if the following people are relatives:
      I found an Anna Kostik arr. New York port on Oct. 4, 1904. She was 15
      years old, single, Ruthenian, going to her brother, Mike Kostyk (sic)
      in Delavanna New York. Her last place of residence was "Mazanna,
      Austria." Looks like she was traveling with Maria Jawornicky (sic),
      age 17 and from the same village and going to the same city as Anna.
      Ship name was the Zeeland from Antwerp.

      I found a Mike Kostyk who arrived at the port of New York on Jan. 17.
      1903, age 17, single, Ruthenian from Odrzechowa (woj. Krosno), Austria
      on the ship, Pennsylvania from Hamburg.

      It appears Anna's maiden name could have been spelled Kostic, Kostik
      or Kostyk. There are several Annas and Mikes and Georges in the on
      line immigration records so you'll have to locate more specific
      information on each person as well as analyze all the records you find
      to see if any of them match the others' information.

      **********************************************************
      The following is for the list archive info regarding KWARCIAK:
      1920 Federal census for Pennsylvania
      Line #16-22.
      First Street;
      John Kavarciak, age 33, wife Anna Kavarciak, age 33.
      Both naturalized in 1916, both arrived in U.S. in 1903 from Austria
      Poland.

      Daughter Jennie, age 4 yrs. 9 months; son, John, age 3 years.
      Oldest living daughter Louise, age 7 DOB: 1913. That's ten years after
      John and Anna arrived in the U.S.
      Possible that earlier children died prior to 1920 or since it looks
      like John (Jan) arrived unmarried, he and Anna could have married in
      the U.S. between 1903 and say, 1906. Locate a civil marriage record or
      church marriage record for them.


      Jan Kwarciak, husband of Anna Kostik (sic) and father of above
      children, arr. in U.S. at age 17, single, port of Baltimore, 1903
      (line 13), from Bukowsko. Traveling with Piotr Zadylak.
      ***************************************************************

      Hope that helps.

      Debbie


      denisecardon wrote:
      > As was requested, I have posted some documents to "Files" reference the
      > family branch of Anna Kostic.
      >
      > Any advice on finding where the Kostic's came from would be greatly
      > appreciated.
      >
      > Thanks!
      > Denise
    • denisecardon
      I have received a reply from a Pittsburgh parish with my grandmothers baptismal record. Her mothers name on the record is Anastasia Kostik. I have been waiting
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 31, 2007
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        I have received a reply from a Pittsburgh parish with my grandmothers
        baptismal record. Her mothers name on the record is Anastasia Kostik.

        I have been waiting for a response from them. Doesn't help me much
        however...I have tried this spelling for immigration but will keep on
        trying!

        The Pittsburgh parishes cannot locate a marriage record for
        Kostik/Kwarciak.

        I am still digging for anything I can find, but wanted to update all
        of you...

        --- In bukowsko_triangle@yahoogroups.com, Debbie Greenlee <daveg@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Denise,
        >
        > I started this so long ago I hope it isn't redundant.
        >
        > We need to isolate spellings for Kostik and find the earliest U.S.
        > documents which would list an "original" spelling.
        >
        > I think the surname in the 1920 Pennsylvania census is spelled,
        > "Kostik" though that doesn't mean it was soundexed/indexed that
        way.
        > If you compare the last letter of the surname on the census with
        the
        > 'k' in the name, "Baker" on line 32, you'll see that the enumerator
        > finishes off his 'Ks' with "new" strokes, as if he is printing and
        not
        > using cursive.
        >
        > Looking at who the brothers are living with, it looks like the
        > enumerator wrote down "Kavarciak". Unless you know differently, this
        > could be the enumerator's phonetic spelling of what was actually
        used
        > by John and Anna Kwarciak at that time. (more fun for you)
        >
        > On the WWI Draft Registration records, what DOB is listed for the
        > George you located? What is the registration number so we can look
        at
        > the same one as you.
        >
        > Since the George and Nick (not sure this is what is written on the
        > census for the brother's given name) Kostik on the 1920 census both
        > indicate that they are NOT citizens, chances are they didn't fight
        in
        > WWI. You do have their arrival dates in the U.S. though, 1908 and
        1913
        > respectively. Of course, since they're in Pennsylvania they could
        have
        > used any number of arrival ports so several should be checked.
        >
        > The 1910 Federal census for Pennsylvania should be checked to see
        if
        > George Kostik appears. Also the 1930 census for both George and
        Nick
        > should be checked. We're trying to find out if either brother
        became a
        > citizen.
        >
        > Since Anna Kostic(k) Kwarciak was naturalized in 1913 (according to
        > the 1920 census), she must have become a citizen under her
        husband's
        > application. Locate John Kwarciak's (Kvarciak) Declaration of
        Intent
        > and his Petition for Naturalization to see how his wife's name was
        > listed. Hopefully it will have her maiden name and perhaps her
        place
        > of birth. From John's citizenship papers you might be able to
        locate
        > Anna's Passenger Arrival Record.
        >
        > Don't know if the following people are relatives:
        > I found an Anna Kostik arr. New York port on Oct. 4, 1904. She was
        15
        > years old, single, Ruthenian, going to her brother, Mike Kostyk
        (sic)
        > in Delavanna New York. Her last place of residence was "Mazanna,
        > Austria." Looks like she was traveling with Maria Jawornicky
        (sic),
        > age 17 and from the same village and going to the same city as Anna.
        > Ship name was the Zeeland from Antwerp.
        >
        > I found a Mike Kostyk who arrived at the port of New York on Jan.
        17.
        > 1903, age 17, single, Ruthenian from Odrzechowa (woj. Krosno),
        Austria
        > on the ship, Pennsylvania from Hamburg.
        >
        > It appears Anna's maiden name could have been spelled Kostic,
        Kostik
        > or Kostyk. There are several Annas and Mikes and Georges in the on
        > line immigration records so you'll have to locate more specific
        > information on each person as well as analyze all the records you
        find
        > to see if any of them match the others' information.
        >
        > **********************************************************
        > The following is for the list archive info regarding KWARCIAK:
        > 1920 Federal census for Pennsylvania
        > Line #16-22.
        > First Street;
        > John Kavarciak, age 33, wife Anna Kavarciak, age 33.
        > Both naturalized in 1916, both arrived in U.S. in 1903 from Austria
        > Poland.
        >
        > Daughter Jennie, age 4 yrs. 9 months; son, John, age 3 years.
        > Oldest living daughter Louise, age 7 DOB: 1913. That's ten years
        after
        > John and Anna arrived in the U.S.
        > Possible that earlier children died prior to 1920 or since it looks
        > like John (Jan) arrived unmarried, he and Anna could have married
        in
        > the U.S. between 1903 and say, 1906. Locate a civil marriage record
        or
        > church marriage record for them.
        >
        >
        > Jan Kwarciak, husband of Anna Kostik (sic) and father of above
        > children, arr. in U.S. at age 17, single, port of Baltimore, 1903
        > (line 13), from Bukowsko. Traveling with Piotr Zadylak.
        > ***************************************************************
        >
        > Hope that helps.
        >
        > Debbie
        >
        >
        > denisecardon wrote:
        > > As was requested, I have posted some documents to "Files"
        reference the
        > > family branch of Anna Kostic.
        > >
        > > Any advice on finding where the Kostic's came from would be
        greatly
        > > appreciated.
        > >
        > > Thanks!
        > > Denise
        >
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