Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: Success

Expand Messages
  • sherrisarts
    Hey Mary-Ann, Congrats on making your long-awaited contact! Care to share your stuffed cabbage recipe or is that not allowed? Just wondering if other people
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 9, 2006
      Hey Mary-Ann,

      Congrats on making your long-awaited contact! Care to share your
      stuffed cabbage recipe or is that not allowed? Just wondering if
      other people refer to them as "pigeons"? My baba also put an over-
      turned glass plate near the bottom of the heavy pot to keep things
      from "catching". It does seem to help, tho' I'm not the family
      chef. Another food question, which I could never track down in the
      ethnic cookbooks: what is the real name for the minidumplings that go
      in chicken soup? Baba refered to them as "jiggers" [probably a
      variation of "thingamajig"] & the name caught on for generations.
      OK, now this is making me hungry...

      Sherri

      --- In bukowsko_triangle@yahoogroups.com, "Mary-Ann" <bensings@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Hi Group!
      > I was finally able to contact my cousin Mary Ann
      Ternowchek/Tarnawczyk - Kelemen (Pennsylvania) yesterday after months
      of trying. You'll recall after trying unsucessfully to write her, I
      came across an email in a message board on the net signed "Mike
      Ternowchek" from Connecticut who turned out to be her brother.
      > They are both interested in the information I told them about here
      at the group pertaining to their family name. I'm hoping to whet
      their appetites enough to join!
      > I found out one of the reasons I couldn't get in touch with Mary
      Ann was that she was at Mardi Gras (she has a daughter who is a
      veterinarian in Baton Rouge and also teaches at LSU that she was
      visiting). We made plans to meet the next time she comes to Florida
      (she owns a home not even ten miles from me)!
      > We talked so long my stuffed cabbage burned to the pot! Thank
      goodness for those loose leaves of cabbage my Gram taught me to line
      the bottom with ;>)
      > Mary-Ann
      > Rockledge, FL
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Mailkimg2@aol.com
      We talked so long my stuffed cabbage burned to the pot! Thank goodness for those loose leaves of cabbage my Gram taught me to line the bottom with ; )
      Message 2 of 7 , Mar 9, 2006
        "We talked so long my stuffed cabbage burned to the pot! Thank goodness for
        those loose leaves of cabbage my Gram taught me to line the bottom with ;>)"


        Mary-Ann,

        I was taught the same thing...to use the really big, first leaves for lining
        the bottom of the pot because "don't ever use that first layer," though I
        never understood that part.

        Kim :)


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Mary-Ann
        Hi Sherri, Every cook has her own version of stuffed cabbage....here is mine: Mary-Ann s Stuffed Cabbage Rolls 1 head of cabbage (about 3 lbs) 1 lbs ground
        Message 3 of 7 , Mar 9, 2006
          Hi Sherri,
          Every cook has her own version of stuffed cabbage....here is mine:

          Mary-Ann's Stuffed Cabbage Rolls




          1 head of cabbage (about 3 lbs)

          1 lbs ground beef (or split it with ground pork)

          1 Tbsp salt

          1/2 Tspn pepper

          2 cans tomato sauce

          1 cup Minute Rice (uncooked)

          1 chopped onion

          2 Tbsp dry minced onion

          3 Tbsp minced garlic (from a jar) (more or less to your taste.we love garlic)



          Cut cabbage deeply around the core to loosen leaves. Boil the cabbage about 5 minutes and begin gently peeling each leaf off as it softens, setting aside to drain.



          Add ground meat, salt, pepper, 1 can of tomato sauce, Minute Rice, chopped onion, dry minced onion and minced garlic together in a large bowl and mix thoroughly.



          Use the large outside leaves to line the bottom of your pot. Place a tablespoon (more or less according to the size of your leaf) of the mixture in the center of the cabbage leaf and roll. If you have really large leaves, you can split them in half. I tuck in the sides first then roll. Place rolls side by side in pot. Pour 1 can of tomatoe sauce over the top and add enough water to cover. Place a heavy dish upside down over the top of the rolls, then cover. Cook on top of the stove (barely bubbling) for about an hour and a half. (Some people do them in the oven at 350, basting often with the sauce).



          I served these today to my daughter's boyfriend for lunch...he ate 6 of them! He said he hadn't had them since his Mom passed away up in Pennsylvania. I sent a large container home with him too.

          Mary-Ann

          Rockledge, FL


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • elstonwe@att.net
          My recipe can be found here along with some other imigrant recipes. http://home.att.net/~elstonwe/recipes.htm Gloria ... From: Mary-Ann
          Message 4 of 7 , Mar 9, 2006
            My recipe can be found here along with some other imigrant recipes.

            http://home.att.net/~elstonwe/recipes.htm

            Gloria
            -------------- Original message ----------------------
            From: "Mary-Ann" <bensings@...>





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Debbie Greenlee
            Sherri, I think I have seen the word for this dumpling translated into English on menus in Poland, as lamb ears. I don t know the Polish words though. Debbie
            Message 5 of 7 , Mar 9, 2006
              Sherri,
              I think I have seen the word for this dumpling translated into English
              on menus in Poland, as "lamb ears." I don't know the Polish words
              though.

              Debbie

              sherrisarts wrote:
              > . . . Another food question, which I could never track down in the
              > ethnic cookbooks: what is the real name for the minidumplings that go
              > in chicken soup? Baba refered to them as "jiggers" [probably a
              > variation of "thingamajig"] & the name caught on for generations.
              > OK, now this is making me hungry...
              >
              > Sherri
            • Debbie Greenlee
              Mary-Ann, I wonder if Kelemen was originally Kal~ymon? Theresa and I have been in contact with a woman who has the surname Kalamon in her line and from the
              Message 6 of 7 , Mar 9, 2006
                Mary-Ann,
                I wonder if Kelemen was originally Kal~ymon? Theresa and I have been in
                contact with a woman who has the surname "Kalamon" in her line and from
                the information I could locate, it appears that Kal~ymon is the original
                spelling - in Polish of course. (I believe the name is L~emko).

                It just dawned on me that up until about 3 years ago my distant cousins,
                Zytka, lived in Port Richey, Fl. Their father, Jan Z~ytka was born in
                Bukowsko. Of course back then (3 years ago) I didn't "know" Mary-Ann and
                now that Z~ytka line has died out.

                Debbie


                Mary-Ann wrote:
                > Hi Group!
                > I was finally able to contact my cousin Mary Ann Ternowchek/Tarnawczyk - Kelemen (Pennsylvania) yesterday after months of trying. You'll recall after trying unsucessfully to write her, I came across an email in a message board on the net signed "Mike Ternowchek" from Connecticut who turned out to be her brother.
                > They are both interested in the information I told them about here at the group pertaining to their family name. I'm hoping to whet their appetites enough to join!
                > I found out one of the reasons I couldn't get in touch with Mary Ann was that she was at Mardi Gras (she has a daughter who is a veterinarian in Baton Rouge and also teaches at LSU that she was visiting). We made plans to meet the next time she comes to Florida (she owns a home not even ten miles from me)!
                > We talked so long my stuffed cabbage burned to the pot! Thank goodness for those loose leaves of cabbage my Gram taught me to line the bottom with ;>)
                > Mary-Ann
                > Rockledge, FL
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.