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Re: [bukowsko_triangle] Sharing our work

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  • Philip Semanchuk
    ... Learn some Slavic languages and go digging in archives. I m fairly sure there s gold there waiting to be mined. Our own Corinna Caudill is getting an MFA
    Message 1 of 5 , May 26 9:04 PM
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      On May 24, 2013, at 10:40 AM, larrybell.cny@... wrote:

      > When you have done all the research you can do, what next?
      >
      > Of course, there is always the possibility of new information--or an odd breakthrough here and there. It never really ends!

      Learn some Slavic languages and go digging in archives. I'm fairly sure there's gold there waiting to be mined.

      Our own Corinna Caudill is getting an MFA (I think -- Corinna, please correct me if you're reading this) centered around her Lemko research:
      http://lemkoproject.blogspot.com/

      > But all these options are for small audiences. Most people are not interested in genealogies of those to whom they are not related. For that matter, most people are not interested in genealogies of those to whom they are related.
      >
      > One way to widen our potential audience is to increase the scope of our research. I purposefully limit the scope of my research because I do not have a head for data. I do not have what it takes to research every relation to the nth degree going back to Africa.
      >
      > Given that limitation, here is my question: How can we share our work with a wider audience? How can we popularize our work?

      I agree with you and Debbie that probably not too many people are likely to be interested in the *facts* of our work. Now if those facts can be woven into a compelling story with less emphasis on numbers (which we genealogists love) and more emphasis on people, then you have something more universal.

      Even my own immediate family is more interested in the context in which our genealogy happened (Austro-Hungarian Empire, Swedish Vikings heading up the court of the Rus, Akcja Wisla, etc.) than the names of our g-grandparents. I empathize. I know that my g-grandmother was Katarzyna Silarska, but does that tell me anything about her? Not really. But knowing that she died in 1947 tells me she lived through two world wars, probably multiple cholera epidemics, the commercialization of the light bulb, etc. No offense to my g-gmother, but the context of her life is more interesting to me because I can't know anything about her personally except for the few dull facts (numbers again) that were written down.

      From this perspective one can write historical fiction, or a fictionalized account of your ancestors' experiences, but that's maybe getting away from what you were looking to do.

      I think the crux of the problem is that genealogical research and broad appeal don't exactly go hand in hand unless you're researching royals.

      Here's one idea: you could sign up for a free blog and write one blog post every day/week/month about your ancestry research. Maybe over time your enthusiasm would fizzle. But if you find it does not, maybe that could form the basis of something more substantial.


      I would enjoy hearing others' ideas.

      Cheers
      P
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