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Research options in Washington, DC

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  • larrybell13071
    We recently visited family near DC during cherry blossom season. We decided to check out the National Archives AND the Library of Congress--not as tourists,
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 13, 2013
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      We recently visited family near DC during cherry blossom season.

      We decided to check out the National Archives AND the Library of Congress--not as tourists, but as researchers.

      Of course, security is tight. A significant amount of time was spent registering and getting security clearance. But then the fun began.

      In the Library of Congress, my wife went to the maps room to photograph early maps of Luzerne County, PA, while I read Civil War era newspapers from Broome County, NY. Non-flash photography is allowed. Everyone, with one exception, was very helpful and friendly.

      Later on after lunch, we went first to the microfilm room and then to the main reading room and waited for a retrieval. While waiting we ogled the architecture and took advantage of free access to Ancestry, Fold3, Proquest and other websites. Finally, a different librarian came on duty and we were told the truth: retrieval probably wouldn't be possible today. Most researchers request materials online days in advance. BUT, we could retrieve our own material downstairs in the genealogical room!

      So off we went, downstairs, where we found very helpful people once again. We found our books (Emigrants from Fellbach, Germany, 1735-1930; Pennsylvania German Pioneers, 1785-1808, vol. 3), took photographs, and called it a day.

      Another day we visited the National Archives. Security clearance here was more time consuming because an entire school class was ahead of us. This was a productive day for my Civil War research. I photographed carded medical records and pension records for two brothers in our family. My wife did not have as good luck--her searches of the federal census and passenger lists were dead ends.

      Some of the research at NARA can be done either online or through the mail, if you know what to ask for.

      Anyway, it was a good week. We felt like we had made the major leagues. And we have the official researcher's card to prove it!

      Larry
    • Frank A. Orasin
      Excellent. I have found that some of the other federal archive sites scattered around the country have excellent original resources vs what Ancestry comes up
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 13, 2013
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        Excellent. I have found that some of the other federal archive sites
        scattered around the country have excellent original resources vs what
        Ancestry comes up with. I have spent many hours at one just south of San
        Francisco and found their cross reference info on early census data
        excellent.

        _____

        From: bukowsko_triangle@yahoogroups.com
        [mailto:bukowsko_triangle@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
        larrybell.cny@...
        Sent: Saturday, April 13, 2013 10:35 AM
        To: bukowsko_triangle@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [bukowsko_triangle] Research options in Washington, DC




        We recently visited family near DC during cherry blossom season.

        We decided to check out the National Archives AND the Library of
        Congress--not as tourists, but as researchers.

        Of course, security is tight. A significant amount of time was spent
        registering and getting security clearance. But then the fun began.

        In the Library of Congress, my wife went to the maps room to photograph
        early maps of Luzerne County, PA, while I read Civil War era newspapers from
        Broome County, NY. Non-flash photography is allowed. Everyone, with one
        exception, was very helpful and friendly.

        Later on after lunch, we went first to the microfilm room and then to the
        main reading room and waited for a retrieval. While waiting we ogled the
        architecture and took advantage of free access to Ancestry, Fold3, Proquest
        and other websites. Finally, a different librarian came on duty and we were
        told the truth: retrieval probably wouldn't be possible today. Most
        researchers request materials online days in advance. BUT, we could retrieve
        our own material downstairs in the genealogical room!

        So off we went, downstairs, where we found very helpful people once again.
        We found our books (Emigrants from Fellbach, Germany, 1735-1930;
        Pennsylvania German Pioneers, 1785-1808, vol. 3), took photographs, and
        called it a day.

        Another day we visited the National Archives. Security clearance here was
        more time consuming because an entire school class was ahead of us. This was
        a productive day for my Civil War research. I photographed carded medical
        records and pension records for two brothers in our family. My wife did not
        have as good luck--her searches of the federal census and passenger lists
        were dead ends.

        Some of the research at NARA can be done either online or through the mail,
        if you know what to ask for.

        Anyway, it was a good week. We felt like we had made the major leagues. And
        we have the official researcher's card to prove it!

        Larry






        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Debbie Greenlee
        Larry, Thank you for the details of your trip. I m sure they will be helpful to others who make the trek to Washington, D.C. and want see more than the White
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 14, 2013
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          Larry,

          Thank you for the details of your trip. I'm sure they will be helpful
          to others who make the trek to Washington, D.C. and want see more than
          the White House.

          Debbie

          larrybell.cny@... wrote:
          > We recently visited family near DC during cherry blossom season.
          >
          > We decided to check out the National Archives AND the Library of Congress--not as tourists, but as researchers.
          >
          > Of course, security is tight. A significant amount of time was spent registering and getting security clearance. But then the fun began.
          >
          > In the Library of Congress, my wife went to the maps room to photograph early maps of Luzerne County, PA, while I read Civil War era newspapers from Broome County, NY. Non-flash photography is allowed. Everyone, with one exception, was very helpful and friendly.
          >
          > Later on after lunch, we went first to the microfilm room and then to the main reading room and waited for a retrieval. While waiting we ogled the architecture and took advantage of free access to Ancestry, Fold3, Proquest and other websites. Finally, a different librarian came on duty and we were told the truth: retrieval probably wouldn't be possible today. Most researchers request materials online days in advance. BUT, we could retrieve our own material downstairs in the genealogical room!
          >
          > So off we went, downstairs, where we found very helpful people once again. We found our books (Emigrants from Fellbach, Germany, 1735-1930; Pennsylvania German Pioneers, 1785-1808, vol. 3), took photographs, and called it a day.
          >
          > Another day we visited the National Archives. Security clearance here was more time consuming because an entire school class was ahead of us. This was a productive day for my Civil War research. I photographed carded medical records and pension records for two brothers in our family. My wife did not have as good luck--her searches of the federal census and passenger lists were dead ends.
          >
          > Some of the research at NARA can be done either online or through the mail, if you know what to ask for.
          >
          > Anyway, it was a good week. We felt like we had made the major leagues. And we have the official researcher's card to prove it!
          >
          > Larry
          >
        • Robert Piech
          Larry,   How are You ?   Today in one of the lagrest Polish portal Onet is interesting article presented - about Lemks. The interesting is that the Lemks
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 20, 2013
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            Larry,
             
            How are You ?
             
            Today in one of the lagrest Polish portal "Onet" is interesting article presented - about Lemks. The interesting is that the Lemks are mostly from Wolochs origin. (we have not slovanian roots)
            Here is the link:
            http://wiadomosci.onet.pl/kiosk/lemkowska-republika,1,5469649,kiosk-wiadomosc.html
             
            Best wishes,
            Robert
             

            ________________________________
              



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • larrybell13071
            Hi Robert, Good to hear from you and thank you for the link. If I understand the article correctly, the Łemko people were formed from a combination of the
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 21, 2013
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              Hi Robert,

              Good to hear from you and thank you for the link.

              If I understand the article correctly, the Łemko people were formed from a combination of the existing Ruthenian population and the migrating Wallachian shepherds.


              Jak daleko sięga nasza opowieść? Co najmniej do XII wieku. Wtedy wołoscy pasterze przywędrowali w te rejony łańcuchami górskimi. Zaczęli mieszać się z żyjącą w okolicy ruską ludnością.


              How much of each? It may be impossible to say. As I understand it, the original Ruthenians were a Slavic people.

              Larry







              --- In bukowsko_triangle@yahoogroups.com, Robert Piech <kalomel1@...> wrote:
              >
              > Larry,
              >  
              > How are You ?
              >  
              > Today in one of the lagrest Polish portal "Onet" is interesting article presented - about Lemks. The interesting is that the Lemks are mostly from Wolochs origin. (we have not slovanian roots)
              > Here is the link:
              > http://wiadomosci.onet.pl/kiosk/lemkowska-republika,1,5469649,kiosk-wiadomosc.html
              >  
              > Best wishes,
              > Robert
              >  
              >
              > ________________________________
              >   
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
            • Robert Piech
              Larry,   Sorry that I did not answer. My grandmother died (pneumonia). She was born in Leszczawa Dolna (probably she was also Wallachian/Lemks). Her familly
              Message 6 of 6 , May 2 8:26 AM
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                Larry,
                 
                Sorry that I did not answer. My grandmother died (pneumonia).
                She was born in Leszczawa Dolna (probably she was also Wallachian/Lemks). Her familly was also emigrated to the US. Unfortunately, I could not ask her about detail.
                 
                Yes Larry, it was combination behinde these people.
                Yes, Ruthenians were Slavic people. 
                 
                Robert


                ________________________________
                From: "larrybell.cny@..." <larrybell.cny@...>
                To: bukowsko_triangle@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Monday, April 22, 2013 1:33 AM
                Subject: [bukowsko_triangle] Re: Lemks


                 

                Hi Robert,

                Good to hear from you and thank you for the link.

                If I understand the article correctly, the Åemko people were formed from a combination of the existing Ruthenian population and the migrating Wallachian shepherds.

                Jak daleko sięga nasza opowieść? Co najmniej do XII wieku. Wtedy wołoscy pasterze przywędrowali w te rejony łańcuchami górskimi. Zaczęli mieszać się z żyjącą w okolicy ruską ludnością.

                How much of each? It may be impossible to say. As I understand it, the original Ruthenians were a Slavic people.

                Larry

                --- In mailto:bukowsko_triangle%40yahoogroups.com, Robert Piech <kalomel1@...> wrote:
                >
                > Larry,
                >  
                > How are You ?
                >  
                > Today in one of the lagrest Polish portal "Onet" is interesting article presented - about Lemks. The interesting is that the Lemks are mostly from Wolochs origin. (we have not slovanian roots)
                > Here is the link:
                > http://wiadomosci.onet.pl/kiosk/lemkowska-republika,1,5469649,kiosk-wiadomosc.html
                >  
                > Best wishes,
                > Robert
                >  
                >
                > ________________________________
                >   
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >




                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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